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I was thinking of adding a simple bandwidth monitor to a console application and I was wondering if it would be possible to keep a line in the console window visible at all times. I could set something up manually to pass new console output into a method that would get the contents of the console, clear the console, add the bandwidth data on the first row, then rewrite each line of previous information back to the console, etc.. but that seems like a really hacky way to go about it, and I'd be limited to the amount of rows visible at once in the console window (no scrolling).

Any idea? Any built in functionality for this? Example:

STATS: Downloaded: 2599b, Uploaded: 754b  <- this always stays at the top   
constantly changing text
constantly changing text
constantly changing text
constantly changing text
constantly changing text
constantly changing text
constantly changing text
constantly changing text
constantly changing text
constantly changing text
constantly changing text
constantly changing text
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Do you intend to fill the Console and use the scroll feature? –  tofutim Jun 1 '11 at 22:02

5 Answers 5

You can use the other members of the Console class, such as CursorTop and CursorLeft to "move around" the cursor. If you move the cursor to the beginning of a line, and then use Console.Write, it will "overwrite" the data at that location.

This lets you create situations like you're describing (by moving the cursor, writing, then moving back).

That being said, I typically would recommend using a GUI application as soon as you need to have multiple items being presented in a specific manner. You'll have much more flexibility (and it will likely be simpler).

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1  
Ooh, good call on moving the cursor position, thanks. –  arc Jun 1 '11 at 22:01
2  
One word of advice (from someone who has done this before), you need to make some provisions to ensure the old data is cleared completely if the new text has fewer characters than the old. If you send "Hi There", followed by "Hello", you'll end up with "Helloere" if you're not careful. –  ckramer Jun 1 '11 at 22:08

As Reed Copsey said, you could easily replicate a fake console application with a WinForm (just a simple form with some formatted text in a RichTextBox). You could do exactly what you want with little hassle and hardly the amount of work involved and get the expected result.

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for (int i = 0, j = 0; i < 10000; i++, j++)
{
    top = Console.CursorTop;
    left = Console.CursorLeft;
    Console.SetCursorPosition(0, 0);
    Console.WriteLine("STATS: Downloaded: {0}b, Uploaded: {1}b", i, j);
}

This will keep the STATS at the top, but depending on the refresh rate and the data below it could become ugly. Basically it will place the text at the very top of the Console window (at the top of the scroll).

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int x = 0;
while(x == 0)
{
    Console.SetCursorPosition(1, 1);
}

Something like that should work. Good luck

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It is not very clear as to what the loop will achieve. But other answers have mentioned moving the cursor position. –  havok Oct 11 '12 at 4:19

If you don't intend to run full screen, you could just use Console.Title.

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Good idea and since the Title is generally a smaller, and non-monospace font, you can actually get more stats in the title bar –  tonycoupland Jan 10 '13 at 10:21

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