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from sys import exit
from random import randint

class Map(object):

 def death(): 
    print quips[randint (0, len(quips)-1)]
    exit(1)

 def princess_lives_here():
    print "You see a beautiful Princess with a shiny crown."
    print "She offers you some cake."

    eat_it = raw_input(">")

    if eat_it == "eat it":
        print "You explode like a pinata full of frogs."
        print "The Princess cackles and eats the frogs. Yum!"
        return 'death'

    elif eat_it == "do not eat it":
        print "She throws the cake at you and it cuts off your head."
        print "The last thing you see is her munching on your face. Yum!"
        return 'death'

    elif eat_it == "make her eat it":
        print "The Princess screams as you cram the cake in her mouth."
        print "Then she smiles and cries and thank you for saving her."
        print "She points to a tiny door and says, 'The Koi needs cake too.'"
        print "She gives you the very last bit of cake and shoves you in."
        return 'gold_koi_pond'

    else:
        print "The Princess looks at you confused and just points at the cake."
        return 'princess_lives_here'

class Engine(object):

 def __init__(self, start, quips):
    self.quips = [
        "You died. You suck at this.",
        "Your mom would be proud, if she were smarter",
        "Such a luser.",
        "I have a small puppy that's better at this."
    ]
    self.start = start

 def play(self):
    next = self.start

    while True:
        print "\n-----"
        room = getattr(self, next)
        next = room()

m = Map()
e = Engine(m, "princess_lives_here")

e.play()

Trace back i get in terminal is:

    Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "ec42.py", line 162, in <module>
    e.play()
  File "ec42.py", line 156, in play
    room = getattr(self, next)
TypeError: getattr(): attribute name must be string

I have been working on this far too long, and just cannot nail it down. The main issue is getting the map class to run inside the engine class as an object. thanks in advance for the help.

share|improve this question
    
"getting the map class to run..." define? – Santa Jun 1 '11 at 22:27
1  
i don't know what the question is, or even the solution. But the story was a fun read. – bharal Jun 15 '12 at 9:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe you want something like this?

class Map(object):

 def __init__(self):

    self.quips = [
        "You died. You suck at this.",
        "Your mom would be proud, if she were smarter",
        "Such a luser.",
        "I have a small puppy that's better at this."
    ]

 def death(self): 
    print self.quips[randint (0, len(self.quips)-1)]
    exit(1)

 def princess_lives_here(self):
    print "You see a beautiful Princess with a shiny crown."
    print "She offers you some cake."

    eat_it = raw_input(">")

    if eat_it == "eat it":
        print "You explode like a pinata full of frogs."
        print "The Princess cackles and eats the frogs. Yum!"
        return 'death'

    elif eat_it == "do not eat it":
        print "She throws the cake at you and it cuts off your head."
        print "The last thing you see is her munching on your face. Yum!"
        return 'death'

    elif eat_it == "make her eat it":
        print "The Princess screams as you cram the cake in her mouth."
        print "Then she smiles and cries and thank you for saving her."
        print "She points to a tiny door and says, 'The Koi needs cake too.'"
        print "She gives you the very last bit of cake and shoves you in."
        return 'gold_koi_pond'

    else:
        print "The Princess looks at you confused and just points at the cake."
        return 'princess_lives_here'

class Engine(object):

 def __init__(self, map, start):
    self.quips = [
        "You died. You suck at this.",
        "Your mom would be proud, if she were smarter",
        "Such a luser.",
        "I have a small puppy that's better at this."
    ]
    self.map = map
    self.start = start

 def play(self):
    next = self.start

    while True:
        print "\n-----"
        room = getattr(self.map, next)
    next = room()
share|improve this answer
    
that gets me closer. now i am having syntax error when trying to play the game: File "ec42.py", line 161 e = Engine(m, "princess_lives_here") ^ SyntaxError: invalid syntax ...does this simply mean i need to assign a new variable for the string to run or should i simply do away with the entire 'e' variable? – Colin Cunningham Jun 1 '11 at 22:39
    
I have modified the above class. Now the code runs. Of course, you still have to implement the 'gold_koi_pond' function, but I think you should get the gist of control flow through the above code (try entering 'eat it') – Akash Jun 1 '11 at 22:59
    
good news is engine is running but now i am getting the following traceback: File "ec42.py", line 171, in <module> the_engine.play() File "ec42.py", line 164, in play print "\n-----" where it continually prints "------" endlessly until I ^C out of it...it should be prompting me into "princess_lives_here" and then asking for a raw input...what did i miss here? – Colin Cunningham Jun 1 '11 at 23:32
    
akash, very well done, its all done. you were dead on in your setup of engine. however it is not necessary to put the quips inside of the class Map. it is however necessary to define quips globally outside of the two classes and before the command fcn at the end of the code. – Colin Cunningham Jun 2 '11 at 1:52
    
yeah. you can put the quips either globally, or inside the map class depending on where you are planning to use it. good luck with learning python. – Akash Jun 2 '11 at 16:42
def __init__(self, start, quips):

...

e = Engine(m, "princess_lives_here")

This is your problem. The second line calls init with arguments m and "princess_lives_here". The first argument should be "princess_lives_here" and the second should be the "quips" list.

share|improve this answer
    
problem here though is typeerror: init takes 2 arguments (1given) – Colin Cunningham Jun 1 '11 at 22:50

To return the value of a named attribute of an object you must supply a string of the name of the attribute.

room = getattr(self, 'next')

From the python docs: getattr(object, name[, default])

Return the value of the named attribute of object.name must be a string. If the string is the name of one of the object’s attributes, the result is the value of that attribute. For example, getattr(x, 'foobar') is equivalent to x.foobar. If the named attribute does not exist, default is returned if provided, otherwise AttributeError is raised.

share|improve this answer
    
That would still give him an AttributeError, if judging only from the given snippet. – Santa Jun 1 '11 at 22:28

self.start is an instance of Map, but the second argument of getattr() must be a string, the name of the attribute.

Also, instance methods should have "self" as the first argument.

share|improve this answer
    
@user589983 when i corrected putting next in quotes i got the traceback that 'Engine' has no object 'next'. so i put in 'map' instead and then got the traceback: 'map' object is not callable...where i am going wrong here? do i need to change how i am calling map class from class engine entirely? – Colin Cunningham Jun 1 '11 at 22:32

The error message actually tells you quite clearly what is wrong here :-)

room = getattr(self, next)

should go more along the lines of

room = getattr(self, 'next')

as described in the Python documentation

But this is only part of the problem here. If I guess right on what you've omitted in your code sample you will probably also need to add a __call__ method to your map object. Otherwise room = getattr(self, next) doesn't make all that much sense :-) Well that and the rest of the code that is probably missing here ;-)

Also all the method definitions on the Map class are missing the "self" argument.

share|improve this answer

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