Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a string that has data separated by a pipe character (|).

Example

var somestring = "data1|data2|data3";
var separated = somestring.split("|");

I know how to use the split() to separate each data.

However, I don't know how many pipes there will be in the resulting Array.

In jQuery or JavaScript, how do I loop over the array returned?

share|improve this question
1  
asked 5 mins ago, already 7 answers, I love stack overflow sometimes... –  Billy Moon Jun 1 '11 at 23:46

7 Answers 7

up vote 29 down vote accepted

In jQuery or JavaScript, how do I loop through each separated variable?

You basically just need to iterate over the resulting Array.

jQuery

$.each loop

This method is easy to work with, and benefits in the variables used being encapsulated.

$.each(separated, function(index, chunk) {
    // `chunk` is each member of the array.
});

jsFiddle.

Of course, jQuery is JavaScript so any of the below methods will also work.

JavaScript

for loop

This is the recommended way.

for (var i = 0, length = separated.length; i < length; i++) {
    var chunk = separated[i];
    // `chunk` is each member of the array.
}

jsFiddle.

You'll notice too the length property is cached so it is not looked up on each iteration. Some browsers already optimise for this, however IE appears to still benefit from it cached. It only takes 5 seconds to do, so you may as well keep IE users happy too.

You may want to define i and chunk outside of the for loop, because JavaScript has no block scope, and those variables will exist before (declaration hoisted) and after (no block scope).

for ( in ) loop

This loop is generally not recommended, as it should be used for iterating over properties only, not array like member properties.

for (var chunk in separated) {
     if ( ! separated.hasOwnProperty(chunk)) {
         continue;
     }
     // `separated[chunk]` is each member of the array.   
}

jsFiddle.

This loop will loop over all properties up the prototype chain, so hasOwnProperty() must be used. For this reason it is not recommended for arrays.

for ( of ) loop

While this loop isn’t supported by any browser other than Firefox yet, it’s standardized in ECMA 6 and thus guaranteed to work in the future (other than the nonstandard for each loop was). It is also able to loop over NodeLists and iterators, so pretty much the best you can get in case your target is a firefox addon or a webapp targeting major browsers in 2014.

for (var chunk of separated) {
     // `chunk` is each member of the array.   
}

jsFiddle

forEach() method

This method is a recent addition to the ECMA-262 standard, and thus doesn't have the best browser support. However, it can be shimmed relatively easily.

separated.forEach(function(chunk, index) {
     // `chunk` is each member of the array.   
});

jsFiddle.

Other specialised methods

If you're looking to iterate for a specific goal, it may be useful to use a specialised iterator. Keep in mind these also don't have the best browser support.

filter method

Creates a mew array of the elements which the associated callback returned truthy for.

separated.filter(function(element) {
    return +element > 255;
});

reduce method

Creates a new value based on reducing the elements of the array, from left to right.

separated.reduce(function(accumulator, element) {
    return accumulator.concat(element);
}, "");

See also the reduceRight method.

map method

Creates a new array, replacing each element with the returned value of the associated callback.

separated.map(function(element) {
    return element.substr(0, 1);
});

every method

Returns a boolean value of which is the result of every element in the array passing the test. This method short circuits, i.e. it returns whenever one element's callback doesn't return truthy.

separated.every(function(element) {
    return element.substr(0, 1) == "a";
});

some method

Returns a boolean value of which is the result of some element in the array passing the test. This method short circuits, i.e. it returns whenever one element's callback passes the test.

separated.some(function(element) {
    return element.substr(0, 1) == "a";
});
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for an education on javascript for loops, I learnt two new things today and it's not even lunch time –  Red Taz Nov 29 '12 at 10:51
    
Yeah alex! Perfect answer! +1 –  stecb Feb 1 '13 at 8:34

separated.length should be all you need.

share|improve this answer

str.split() returns an array of values, so in your example, since 'separated' is an array, you could:

for (var i=0, len=separated.length; i < len; i++) {
   // do something with separated[i]
}
share|improve this answer

you can do it in jquery like this

$.each(separated,function(key,item){ alert('here is ' + item + ' at position ' + key) })
share|improve this answer

If you mean you want to know the length of the resulting array, what about separated.length?

basic loop through arrays:

for (var i=0; i<separated.length; i++){
  // do something with separated[i]
}

for utmost speed (especially in IE, see comments) cache the arrays length:

var i = 0,                  //now you can omit var i=0 in the loop
    len = separated.length; //arrays length is cached

for (; i<len; i++){
  // do something with separated[i]
}
share|improve this answer
    
Placing 'separated.length' in the second element of a 'for' loop requires it to be evaluated on each pass through the loop. A better solution would be to pre-compute the length into a var. –  Rob Raisch Jun 1 '11 at 23:47
    
@Rob: that's old knowledge. Most browser optimize nowadays. Please check: stackoverflow.com/questions/5752906/… –  KooiInc Jun 1 '11 at 23:53
    
Thanks, good to know! –  Rob Raisch Jun 1 '11 at 23:55
    
@KooiInc Nice link, but you said yourself that IE users can benefit from the cached length property :) –  alex Jun 2 '11 at 0:17
1  
The more I think about Kooilnc's comment, the more I believe it to be a red herring. Relying on special knowledge of your execution environment to fix an obvious design problem is both lazy and will bite you in the butt when you use it on other platforms. Good design is good design irrespective of execution optimization. –  Rob Raisch Jun 2 '11 at 15:31

If your question really is "how do I loop through each separated variable?" then:

for (var i = 0; i < separated.length; i++)
{
 //Do something with separated[i];
}

//or  (apparently this is deprecated)

for(var a in separated)
{
  //Do something with a
}
share|improve this answer
    
for(var a in array) is deprecated and should not be used. –  Rob Raisch Jun 1 '11 at 23:45
    
Didn't realize that, I was thinking of how I usually do it in C#. I'll edit my answer. –  Ivan Jun 1 '11 at 23:46
    
@Rob It's not deprecated, it is just not the best loop for iterating over an Array. –  alex Jun 2 '11 at 0:08
    
@Alex, best practice states for-in is to be used to iterate the properties of an object, not the elements of an array. See developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference –  Rob Raisch Jun 2 '11 at 2:14
    
@Rob True, but it isn't deprecated anywhere is it? –  alex Jun 2 '11 at 2:35

Loop through with a FOR...NEXT construct like in most other languages:

var somestring = "data1|data2|data3";
var separated = somestring.split("|");

for (i=0 ; i<separated.length; i++) {
 document.write(separated[i]);
 document.write("<br/>");
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.