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Here is my sample code:

var http = require('http');

var options1 = {
          host: 'www.google.com',
          port: 80,
          path: '/',
          method: 'GET'
        };

http.createServer(function (req, res) {

        var start = new Date();
        var myCounter = req.query['myCounter'] || 0;

        var isSent = false;
        http.request(options1, function(response) {
            response.setEncoding('utf8');
            response.on('data', function (chunk) {
                var end = new Date();
                console.log(myCounter + ' BODY: ' + chunk  + " time: " + (end-start) + " Request start time: " + start.getTime());

                if (! isSent) {
                    isSent = true;
                    res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'application/xml'});
                    res.end(chunk);
                }
            });
        }).end();


}).listen(3013);

console.log('Server running at port 3013');

What i found out is that, if I connect to other server, (google or any other), the response will get slower and slower to few seconds. It doesn't happen if I connect to another node.js server within the same network.

I use JMeter to test. 50 concurrent per sec with 1000 loop.

I have no idea what the problem is...

=========================

Further investigation:

I run the same script on Rackspace, and also on EC2 for testing. And the script will use http.request to connect to: Google, Facebook, and also my another script that simply output data (like hello world) which is hosted by another EC2 instance.

The test tool I just is jMeter on my desktop.

Pre-node.js test: jMeter -> Google Result: fast and consistent. jMeter -> Facebook result: fast and consistent. jMeter -> My Simple Output Script Result: fast and consistent.

Then I make a 50 Concurrent Threads /sec , with 100 loops, testing to my Rackspace nodejs, and then EC2 node.js which has the same king of performance issue jMeter -> node.js -> Google Result: from 50 ms goes to 2000 ms in 200 requsets.
jMeter -> node.js -> Facebook Result: from 200 ms goes to 3000 ms after 200 requsets.
jMeter -> node.js -> My Simple Output Script Result: from 100 ms goes to 1000 ms after 200 requsets.
The first 10-20 requests are fast, then start slowing down.

Then, when I change to 10 Concurrent Threads, things start changing.. The response is very consistent, no slow down.

Something to do with # of concurrent threads that Node.js (http.request) can handle.

------------ More --------------

I did more test today and here it is: I used http.Agent and increase the max socket. However, the interesting this is that, on one testing server (EC2), it improves a lot and no more slow down. HOwever, the other server (rackspace) only improves a bit. It still shows slow down. I even set "Connection: close" in the request header, it only improves 100ms.

if http.request is using connection pooling, how to increase it?

in both server, if I do "ulimit -a", the # of file open is 1024.

------------- ** MORE AND MORE ** -------------------

It seems that even I set maxSockets to higher number, it only works at some limit. There seems to be a internal or OS dependent socket limitation. However to bump it up?

------------- ** AFTER EXTENSIVE TESTING ** ---------------

After reading lots of post, I find out:



quoted from: https://github.com/joyent/node/issues/877


1) If I set the headers with connection = 'keep-alive', the performance is good and can go up to maxSocket = 1024 (which is my linux setting).

var options1 = {
                  host: 'www.google.com',
                  port: 80,
                  path: '/',
                  method: 'GET',
    **headers: {
            'Connection':'keep-alive'
    }**
                };

If I set it to "Connection":"close", the response time would be 100 times slower.

Funny things happened here:

1) in EC2, when I first test with Connection:keep-alive, it will take about 20-30 ms. Then if I change to Connection:Close OR set Agent:false, the response time will slow down to 300 ms. WIHTOUT restarting the server, if I change to Connection:keep-alive again, the response time will slow down even further to 4000ms. Either I have to restart server or wait for a while to get back my 20-30ms lighting speed response.

2) If I run it with agent:false, at first, the response time will slow down to 300ms. But then, it will get faster again and back to "normal".

My guess is connection pooling still in effect even you set agent:false. However, if you keep connection:keep-alive, then it will be fast for sure. just don't switch it.




Update on July 25, 2011

I tried the latest node.js V0.4.9 with the http.js & https.js fix from https://github.com/mikeal/node/tree/http2

the performance is much better and stable.

share|improve this question
    
Instead of doing that isSent magic you should listen for then response.on('end') event. –  Daniel Baulig Jun 2 '11 at 0:30
    
Thanks for advise. :) –  murvinlai Jun 4 '11 at 1:13
    
I run into the same issue and see considerable performance gain with keep-alive change however I am running into an error after some time when load testing. Below is the error : { [Error: connect EADDRNOTAVAIL] code: 'EADDRNOTAVAIL', errno: 'EADDRNOTAVAIL', syscall: 'connect' } –  firemonkey Apr 30 '13 at 15:16
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4 Answers 4

I solved the problem with

require('http').globalAgent.maxSockets = 100000

or

agent = new http.Agent()
agent.maxSockets = 1000000  # 1 million
http.request({agent:agent})
share|improve this answer
add comment

This will not neccesarily fix your problem, but it cleans up your code a bit and makes use of the various events in the way you should:

var http = require('http');

var options1 = {
      host: 'www.google.com',
      port: 80,
      path: '/',
      method: 'GET'
};

http.createServer(function (req, res) {
    var start = new Date();
    var myCounter = req.query['myCounter'] || 0;

    http.request(options1, function(response) {
        res.on('drain', function () { // when output stream's buffer drained 
            response.resume(); // continue to receive from input stream
        });
        response.setEncoding('utf8');
        res.writeHead(response.statusCode, {'Content-Type': 'application/xml'});
        response.on('data', function (chunk) {
            if (!res.write(chunk)) { // if write failed, the stream is choking
                response.pause(); // tell the incoming stream to wait until output stream drained
            }
        }).on('end', function () {
            var end = new Date();
            console.log(myCounter + ' time: ' + (end-start) + " Request start time: " + start.getTime());
            res.end();
        });
    }).end();
}).listen(3013);

console.log('Server running at port 3013');

I removed the output of the body. Since we are streaming from one socket to another we cannot be sure to see the entire body at any time without buffering it.

EDIT: I believe node is using connection pooling for http.request. If you have 50 concurrent connections (and thus 50 concurrent http.request attempts) you might be running into the connection pool limit. I currently have no time to look this up for you, but you should have a look at the node documentation regarding http, especially http agent.

EDIT 2: There's a thread regarding a very similar problem on the node.js mailing list. You should have a look at it, especially Mikael's post should be of interest. He suggests turning off connection pooling entirely for the requests by passing the option agent: false to the http.request invocation. I do not have any further clues, so if this does not help maybe you should try getting help on the node.js mailing list.

share|improve this answer
    
still the same thing. I was running on Rackspace server, and now, I will try that on a EC2 server and see if it makes any difference. Damn... :( –  murvinlai Jun 2 '11 at 20:42
    
Please note the edit on my answer. –  Daniel Baulig Jun 3 '11 at 6:25
    
hi. I did a test today. Please see my update in my original post above. :) –  murvinlai Jun 3 '11 at 8:11
    
See my second edit please. I have no other idea why there is a difference in behaviour between EC2 and Rackspace. Maybe it's due to bandwith limitations? –  Daniel Baulig Jun 3 '11 at 8:38
    
I just run a test. setting agent:false has no affect. Does the connection pooling also restricted / limited by hardware or OS setting? –  murvinlai Jun 3 '11 at 21:57
show 1 more comment

Github issue 877 may be related:

https://github.com/joyent/node/issues/877

Though it's not clear to me if this is what you're hitting. The "agent: false" workaround worked for me when I hit that, as did setting a "connection: keep-alive" header with the request.

share|improve this answer
    
What I find out is, if set agent:false with connection:keep-alive, the speed is consistent but a bit slower. If agent is set with connection:keep-alive, sometimes, the first couple requests will be slower but then it will be very quick. (faster than agent:false). if connection not set, or connection:close, then it will be a disaster. –  murvinlai Jun 7 '11 at 17:07
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I was struggling with the same problem. I found my bottleneck to be the DNS stuff, although I'm not exactly clear where/why. If I make my requests to something like http://myserver.com/asd I am barely able to run 50-100 rq/s and if I go beyond 100 rq/s and more things become disaster, response times become huge and some requests never finish and wait indefinitely and I need to kill -9 my server. If I make the requests to the IP address of the server everything is stable at 500 rq/s although not exactly smooth and the graph (I have realtime graph) is peaky. And beware there is still limit to the number of open files in Linux and I managed to hit it once. Another observation is that single node process can not smoothly make 500 rq/s. But I can start 4 node processes each making 200 rq/s and I get very smooth graph and consistent CPU/net load and very short response times. This is node 0.10.22 .

share|improve this answer
1  
Turned out this is a nodejs bug with DNS. I can't say for sure but form my code inspection seems that there is a case where the "dns resolved" callback can be assigned after the event but I stopped digging deeper after finding out that there was changes in this direction in the unstable version of node and the problem is not manifest there. Seems fixed in node 0.11.9 and the my infinite request problem doesn't manifest there. –  bobef Nov 29 '13 at 17:48
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