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I'm trying to make a transition from php to perl and expectedly running into some weirdness. I cannot understand why one version of my code works vs another.

This fails:

sub tester
{
$return;
($_[0] < 10) ? $return = "youre a youngin" : $return = "youre an old person";
return $return;
}


print "how old are you?";
$a = <>;
chomp $a;

print  tester($a);  #both result in "youre an old person"

however this one works:

sub tester
{
    return ($_[0] < 10) ? "youre a youngin" : "youre an old person";
}


print "how old are you?";
$a = <>;
chomp $a;
print  tester($a);

what is the real difference here?!

share|improve this question
1  
That first example has some pretty suspect use of ternary operator (?:) going on... –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 2 '11 at 0:19
1  
Doesn't = takes precedence over ?: braking this up? –  Dani Jun 2 '11 at 0:21
    
Well, what's the error message? –  Jonah Jun 2 '11 at 0:23
1  
@Jonah: and that has what to do with this question? –  ysth Jun 2 '11 at 7:06
1  
@ysth: everything. What is "this fails" supposed to mean? I suppose it would just be totally obvious to someone who knows Perl, but one should always give the details of the problem. –  Jonah Jun 2 '11 at 18:10

6 Answers 6

It is related to Perl's operator precedence. In Perl,

($_[0] < 10) ? $return = "youre a youngin" : $return = "youre an old fart";

is same as

( ($_[0] < 10) ? $return = "youre a youngin" : $return ) = "youre an old fart";

notice the paren binds to the FRONT.

and this leads to another confusing feature of Perl: conditional lvalues: You can do this (CONDITION ? $ASSIGN_A_IF_CONDITION_IS_TRUE : $ASSIGN_B_IF_CONDITION_IS_FALSE) = 2

Here is a fix

($_[0] < 10) ? ($return = "youre a youngin") : ($return = "youre an old fart");

http://codepad.org/MxBAy7wy

EDIT:

However, most people would write

$return = ($_[0] < 10) ? "youre a youngin" : "youre an old fart";

, saving the redundancy of typing the variable twice.

According to Perl and PHP docs, Perl ?: is right-associative and PHP ?: is left-associative. (http://perldoc.perl.org/perlop.html ) (http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.precedence.php )

share|improve this answer
5  
I know nothing of Perl, but surely it supports something a bit more canonical like $return = (cond ? a : b) instead of cond ? ($return = a) : ($return = b)? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 2 '11 at 0:27
    
yes, that works and saves character count. (I was trying to fix what he was trying to express so I left his form) –  SHiNKiROU Jun 2 '11 at 0:28
1  
@SHiN: Oh, I wasn't thinking of character count! But this is the canonical usage of the ternary operator in all the languages that support it. The OP's usage is highly non-standard (unless it's a Perl idiom), so probably best to avoid it. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 2 '11 at 0:30
3  
You can get Perl to show you precedence with B::Deparse. Run your program with perl -MO=Deparse,-p whatever.pl and it will display the code with implied parenthesis included. –  Schwern Jun 2 '11 at 1:46
1  
associativity has nothing to do with it; it's a difference in precedence (where php has some odd rule making = higher precedence in some cases) –  ysth Jun 2 '11 at 7:09

Ah, you've discovered why ?: is a bad idea except in trivial cases.

Operator precedence is the problem. You most likely want to do this:

$return = ($_[0] < 10) ? "you're a youngin'" : "you're an old fart";

There are a few other issues with your code, though.

  • You should declare your variables. They aren't declared on first use as in PHP; you do it explicitly with the my operator.
  • You should always, always, always use strict and use warnings in Perl code. These pragmas disable ancient Perl shenanigans and warn about suspicious operations that might be bugs.
  • The first line of a function should usually be unpacking @_; there's very little reason to use $_[0] directly in a function. (And it's dangerous to do so, since @_ is aliased; you could change the caller's variables!)

So you probably want something more like this:

use strict;
use warnings;

sub tester {
    my ($age) = @_;
    if ($age < 10) {
        return "you're a youngin'";
    }
    else {
        return "you're an old fart";
    }
}

print "how old are you? ";
my $age = <>;
chomp $age;

print tester($age);

Note that my $x = ... declares a single variable and assigns a single value, whereas my ($x, $y, $z) = ... declares multiple variables and unpacks a list into them.

my variables are called lexical and only exist within the block where you declare them; they aren't function-scoped like PHP variables. Actually you should probably just read about them in perlsub.

share|improve this answer

It's a precedence thing.

($_[0] < 10) ? ($return = "youre a youngin") : ($return = "youre an old fart");

...works better.

But honestly, no serious Perl programmer would write it like this. First, they would put the following at the top of their program:

use warnings;
use strict;

Second, they would put the argument into a local:

sub tester {
    my $arg = shift;

Third, they would write the conditional in one of two ways:

if ($arg < 10) {
    $return = "you're a youngin";
}
else {
    $return = "you're an old fart";
}

If they came from a Lisp background, they would probably dispense with the $return variable and just write:

return $arg < 10 ? "you're a youngin" : "you're an old fart";
share|improve this answer

If you write:

sub tester
{
   return ($_[0] < 10) ? "You're a young'un" : "You're an oldie";
}

then you get the result you expect.

share|improve this answer

Basically, operator precedence.

share|improve this answer
    
Would you care to expand on that? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 2 '11 at 0:23
    
Assignment has low precedence, lower than that of the ternary operator. –  MRAB Jun 2 '11 at 16:09
    
I thought it was perfectly clear as is –  ysth Jun 2 '11 at 21:54
    
This is really a comment, not an answer to the question. Please use "add comment" to leave feedback for the author. –  Tim Aug 10 '12 at 23:06

I believe $return; is a syntax error. You don't need to declare it - variables in perl and php are scopeless.
In addition = takes precedence over ?: so you need to add () to both assignments.

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4  
This is woefully incorrect. You absolutely SHOULD declare everything in Perl; otherwise all variables are globals! –  Eevee Jun 2 '11 at 0:24
    
yes just remove the first $return; from the php –  Trevor Rudolph Jun 2 '11 at 0:24
2  
You should declare it, but with my $return; and of course use strict; at the beginning of the script to enforce it. Not doing so is a pretty poor practice because you have no scope to your variables. –  Brian Roach Jun 2 '11 at 0:28
4  
Incorrect. Perl does not have function-scoped variables. It has package globals (our or unrecognized names without strict) and block-scoped lexicals (my or state). And a variable name alone isn't a syntax error, either; it'll raise a "void context" warning under warnings, though. –  Eevee Jun 2 '11 at 0:33
3  
@Dani: Please have a look at perldoc perlsub (the document from Perl's POD). You keep stabbing at discussing scoping, but your assertions seem to be way off base. –  DavidO Jun 2 '11 at 4:05

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