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I want to write a bash command that greps all *.txt file with a pattern in current folder to another folder. Should I use find or for loop? I tried using find but it seems to complicate things.

Edit: I want to copy files with a specific pattern to a different folder. For example:

A.txt
B.txt
C.txt

all have the word "foo" in them. I want grep to remove "foo" and send it to a different folder with the same name. I don't want to change the original file in any way.

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1  
I'm sorry, I don't understand what you're trying to do. Can you give some example of the content you wish to find, what information you're trying to use from that output in .. futher work in another directory? .. and how you tried to solve your problem using find(1) in the first place? –  sarnold Jun 2 '11 at 2:13
    
Seems like the question is still missing a verb in this phrase "in current folder to another folder." Are we identifying files to mv or cp, or similar? –  baraboom Jun 2 '11 at 2:14
    
I don't want to change the original file. –  Mark Jun 2 '11 at 2:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using for would probably be a lot easier for this than find. Something like this:

otherdir='your_other_directory'
for file in *.txt; do
    grep -q 'foo' $file && grep -v 'foo' < $file > $otherdir/$file
done

If your grep doesn't understand -q then:

otherdir='your_other_directory'
for file in *.txt; do
    grep 'foo' $file > /dev/null && grep -v 'foo' < $file > $otherdir/$file
done

In any case, grep returns a true value to the shell if it finds a match and the X && Y construct executes the Y command if X returns a true value.

UPDATE: The above solution assumes (as noted by Johnsyweb) that you want to remove any lines that contain "foo". If you just want to remove "foo" without removing whole lines, then sed is your friend:

otherdir='your_other_directory'
for file in *.txt; do
    grep -q 'foo' $file && sed 's/foo//g' < $file > $otherdir/$file
done

Or:

otherdir='your_other_directory'
for file in *.txt; do
    grep 'foo' $file > /dev/null && sed 's/foo//g' < $file > $otherdir/$file
done
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1  
grep -v 'foo' < ${file} will strip all lines containing 'foo' from ${file}. This may be what is required, it's very hard to tell from the question as posed. Alternatively, sed -e 's/foo//g' might be more apt. –  Johnsyweb Jun 2 '11 at 6:30
1  
@Johnsyweb: The question is rather ambiguous on that point and it looks like John Kugelman made the same choice I did (this is Unix, you're supposed to get burned if you're not careful :). I've added an update to account for that possibility. –  mu is too short Jun 2 '11 at 6:38

You could do this with find. (You need the sh -c to get the > redirection to work.)

find -name '*.txt' -exec sh -c 'grep -v foo {} > new/{}' \;

Or with a for loop. This will be more robust when handling unusual file names, such as files with spaces.

for FILE in *.txt; do
    grep -v foo "$FILE" > "new/$FILE"
done

If the files are in some other directory old rather than the current directory, use basename to strip out the directory:

for FILE in old/*.txt; do
    grep -v foo "$FILE" > "new/$(basename "$FILE")"
done
share|improve this answer
    
question: why are you looping in old/*.txt? Does that mean find all files with .txt in current directory? Also, why do I need basename? isn't $FILE already in basename? –  Mark Jun 2 '11 at 2:29
    
I probably made this more generic than you needed. Edited my answer. –  John Kugelman Jun 2 '11 at 2:33

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