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I have this code:

    public IEnumerable<int> Iterator {
        get { if (false) yield return -1; }
    }

It is fairly ugly, but when you try to refactor it to:

    public IEnumerable<int> Iterator {
        get { return null; }
    }

The following code breaks:

foreach (var item in obj.Iterator) {
}

How would you go about cleaning this up?

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

The .NET framework already has a method to do exactly this, by the way (making Jared's code redundant): System.Enumerable.Empty<T>.

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yerp this is my favorite by far – Sam Saffron Mar 7 '09 at 21:56
    
But ... its only available with .Net 3.5 – Sam Saffron Mar 7 '09 at 21:58
public IEnumerable<int> Iterator {
    get { yield break; }
}
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my new favorite – Will Nov 12 '09 at 19:38

A better solution would be to define a reusable method for this problem. I keep a method around in my shared library to take care of just this case.

public static class CollectionUtility { 
  public static IEnumerable<T> CreateEmptyEnumerable<T>() {
    yield break;
  }
}

Now in your method you could just call

public static IEnumerable<int> Iterator { 
  get { return CollectionUtility.CreateEmptyEnumerable<int>(); }
}
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impressive. Much better than yield break;. Yes, I'm being sarcastic. – Will Nov 12 '09 at 19:39
  public IEnumerable<int> Iterator {
        get { yield break; }
    }
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