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I decided to create simple isEven and isOdd function with a very simple algorithm:

function isEven(n) {
  n = Number(n);
  return n === 0 || !!(n && !(n%2));
}

function isOdd(n) {
  return isEven(Number(n) + 1);
}

That is OK if n is with certain parameters, but fails for many scenarios. So I set out to create robust functions that deliver correct results for as many scenarios as I could, so that only integers within the limits of javascript numbers are tested, everything else returns false (including + and - infinity). Note that zero is even.

// Returns true if:
//
//    n is an integer that is evenly divisible by 2
//
// Zero (+/-0) is even
// Returns false if n is not an integer, not even or NaN
// Guard against empty string

(function (global) {

  function basicTests(n) {

    // Deal with empty string
    if (n === '') 
      return false;

    // Convert n to Number (may set to NaN)
    n = Number(n);

    // Deal with NaN
    if (isNaN(n)) 
      return false;

    // Deal with infinity - 
    if (n === Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY || n === Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY)
      return false;

    // Return n as a number
    return n;
  }

  function isEven(n) {

    // Do basic tests
    if (basicTests(n) === false)
      return false;

    // Convert to Number and proceed
    n = Number(n);

    // Return true/false
    return n === 0 || !!(n && !(n%2));
  }
  global.isEven = isEven;

  // Returns true if n is an integer and (n+1) is even
  // Returns false if n is not an integer or (n+1) is not even
  // Empty string evaluates to zero so returns false (zero is even)
  function isOdd(n) {

    // Do basic tests
    if (basicTests(n) === false)
      return false;

    // Return true/false
    return n === 0 || !!(n && (n%2));
  }
  global.isOdd = isOdd;

}(this));

Can anyone see any issues with the above? Is there a better (i.e. more accurate, faster or more concise without being obfuscated) version?

There are various posts relating to other languages, but I can't seem to find a definitive version for ECMAScript.

Edit

A code review tag was added, but I'm not after a code review. I posted the code simply so others could see where I was up to, not as something to review. Answers posted so far seem to get that.

Edit 2

A final function, based on Steve's answer:

// Use abstract equality == for "is number" test
function isEven(n) {
  return n == parseFloat(n)? !(n%2) : void 0;
}

// Use strict equality === for "is number" test
function isEvenStrict(n) {
  return n === parseFloat(n)? !(n%2) : void 0;
}

Anything that is not a number returns undefined, numbers return either true or false. It could be one function with a strict flag, but I think the strict comparison is not really required.

share|improve this question
    
Both I guess. How embarrassing :( – Imran Aug 3 '11 at 10:28

10 Answers 10

up vote 123 down vote accepted

Use modulus:

function isEven(n) {
   return n % 2 == 0;
}

function isOdd(n) {
   return Math.abs(n % 2) == 1;
}

You can check that any value in Javascript can be coerced to a number with:

Number.isFinite(parseFloat(n))

This check should preferably be done outside the isEven and isOdd functions, so you don't have to duplicate error handling in both functions.

share|improve this answer
    
@Steve Yes, but JS has some special issues when value is not a number, or even if it's a number. Ex.: 0.1%2, NaN%2, []%2, etc. What you wrote in the answer, he already knows it. – Alin Purcaru Jun 2 '11 at 7:29
1  
0.1 and NaN work fine with the function above. Empty array is a bit of a pain as it equates to 0... – Steve Mayne Jun 2 '11 at 7:41
1  
@Alin - I've added a numeric check. I'm not sure I understand the scenario when you'd want an arithmetic function to explicitly handle other datatypes, but if that's what the OP wants... – Steve Mayne Jun 2 '11 at 7:51
2  
What about changing return n == parseInt(n); to return n === parseInt(n);? – JiminP Jun 2 '11 at 7:52
1  
I think I read somewhere what you should check n % 2 !== 0 when checking for odd numbers, because it isn't necessarily 1, depending on the language. EDIT: Ah, that is what the .abs call is for. Nevermind then. – ptf Dec 5 '14 at 9:41

I prefer using a bit test:

if(i & 1)
{
    // ODD
}
else
{
    // EVEN
}

This tests whether the first bit is on which signifies an odd number.

share|improve this answer
    
Only useful if you know i is a number to start with. Non–numbers should return undefined (or maybe throw an error, but undefined seems sensible). – RobG Mar 11 '14 at 0:15
    
Agreed 'undefined' would be a good return on data types other than numbers. This was just a quick and dirty example of the conditional and not a full implementation. – Robert Brisita Mar 11 '14 at 20:20

How about the following? I only tested this in IE, but it was quite happy to handle strings representing numbers of any length, actual numbers that were integers or floats, and both functions returned false when passed a boolean, undefined, null, an array or an object. (Up to you whether you want to ignore leading or trailing blanks when a string is passed in - I've assumed they are not ignored and cause both functions to return false.)

function isEven(n) {
   return /^-?\d*[02468]$/.test(n);
}

function isOdd(n) {
   return /^-?\d*[13579]$/.test(n);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Quite good, but can't handle 2.122e3. – RobG Jun 2 '11 at 8:49
2  
For my implementation isEven(2.122e3) returns true, but isEven("2.122e3") returns false. Conversely my isEven() fails for really big numbers because JS puts them in the exponent format when converting to string for the regex test. Oh well. – nnnnnn Jun 2 '11 at 9:44

Note: there are also negative numbers.

function isOddInteger(n)
{
   return isInteger(n) && (n % 2 !== 0) ) ;
}

where

function isInteger(n)
{
   return n === parseInt(n);
}
share|improve this answer
    
You would be better off just saying (n % 2 != 0) having established that your number is an integer? – Steve Mayne Jan 29 '14 at 14:38
    
@Steve. Yes, you are right. I will make that change. Thanks. – Ivo Renkema Jan 29 '14 at 15:05
    
Doesn't parseInt need a radix here? – blablabla Jun 25 '15 at 8:12
var isEven = function(number) {
    // Your code goes here!
    if (number % 2 == 0){
       return(true);
    }
    else{
       return(false);    
    }
};
share|improve this answer
4  
return is not a function. – user1907906 Jul 6 '14 at 15:09

Different way:

var isEven = function(number) {
  // Your code goes here!
  if (((number/2) - Math.floor(number/2)) === 0) {return true;} else {return false;};
};

isEven(69)
share|improve this answer
    
or .... return (number/2 == Math.floor(number/2)); – HardlyNoticeable Mar 24 '15 at 0:08

A simple modification/improvement of Steve Mayne answer!

function isEvenOrOdd(n){
    if(n === parseFloat(n)){
        return isNumber(n) && (n % 2 == 0);
    }
    return false;
}

Note: Returns false if invalid!

share|improve this answer

Otherway using strings because why not

function isEven(__num){
    return String(__num/2).indexOf('.') === -1;
}
share|improve this answer

This one is more simple!

  var num = 3 //instead get your value here
  var aa = ["Even", "Odd"];

  alert(aa[num % 2]);
share|improve this answer
    
That will return undefined for num = -1 – Oleander Dec 10 '15 at 4:01
if (testNum == 0);
else if (testNum % 2  == 0);
else if ((testNum % 2) != 0 );
share|improve this answer
    
With no explanation your contribution does not have much value. It also repeats information that has already been presented in the discussion. – Cindy Meister Apr 3 at 21:11

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