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How can I detect if a file is a compiled object ( .o .a (library)) or executable, without the file extension?

I want to do this so that I can then issue the standard what command to see what .c / .h files were used to build the binary.

Presumably there would be some kind of header at the beginning of the file or some other pattern to look for (?)

Had a look around here and elsewhere a little already but the answers tend to be about MIME types and web development / handling of such files:

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(If you're in Unix/Linux, does the file command do anything helpful?) –  marnir Jun 2 '11 at 8:08
    
+1 Yep it does! e.g.: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), for GNU/Linux 2.2.5, dynamically linked (uses shared libs), for GNU/Linux 2.2.5, not stripped -- I can use regex to parse this text data so this should work for me. So why didn't you submit this as your answer rather than a comment? Don't be shy! If you submit this as an answer I would be likely +1 it and accept it, I'll give others a chance but your suggestion looks pretty good to me. –  therobyouknow Jun 2 '11 at 8:45
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Because it was a bit of a guess :P I'll submit then :) –  marnir Jun 2 '11 at 12:10

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're in Unix/Linux, the file command is useful for determining file type of files without relying on a file extension.

It looks at things like "is this a special device rather than a normal file", then looks for "magic numbers" which identify certain file format, etc.

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+1 That should do what I need - thanks: e.g. ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), for GNU/Linux 2.2.5, dynamically linked (uses shared libs), for GNU/Linux 2.2.5, not stripped -- I can use regex to parse this text data so this should work for me. –  therobyouknow Jun 2 '11 at 15:25

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