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How do I get distinct title.id's from this:

 SELECT Title.id, Title.title FROM titles as Title HAVING points > 0 
 UNION ALL 
 SELECT Title.id, Title.title FROM titles as Title HAVING points > 1

There is more to the query but this should be enough to go on.

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Which flavor SQL? Also, this is strange, isn't HAVING points > 0 and HAVING points > 1 equivalent to one query for points > 0? –  tofutim Jun 2 '11 at 8:14
3  
yeah there is more to the query...so ignore the Having part –  chris Jun 2 '11 at 8:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Just remove the ALL. Some flavors allow adding DISTINCT instead of ALL to be more explicit, but that's redundant having that the default is always to filter our duplicates.

MySQL - http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/union.html
MSSQL - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms180026.aspx
ORACLE - http://www.techonthenet.com/sql/union.php
PostgreSQL - http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.3/interactive/queries-union.html
etc.

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2  
"The default behavior for UNION is that duplicate rows are removed from the result. The optional DISTINCT keyword has no effect other than the default because it also specifies duplicate-row removal. With the optional ALL keyword, duplicate-row removal does not occur and the result includes all matching rows from all the SELECT statements." –  tofutim Jun 2 '11 at 8:17
    
I couldn't find the official reference for Oracle, so if anyone knows it please edit the answer or post it in a comment and I'll change it. –  Alin Purcaru Jun 2 '11 at 8:21
    
@tofutim A quote would be good in the answer, but that is from the MySQL manual and he said nothing about using MySQL. –  Alin Purcaru Jun 2 '11 at 8:27
    
I'm using MySQL, forgot to add that, but there is more to the query. See my edits above. The points column throws the uniqueness off. –  chris Jun 2 '11 at 8:30
    
Yes indeed. Your answer is sweet. Keep up the good work. –  tofutim Jun 2 '11 at 8:35

Isn't the simple way just get rid of the union and the second part altogether:

SELECT Title.id, Title.title FROM titles as Title HAVING points > 0 

since HAVING points > 0 includes anything with HAVING points > 1?

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1  
That was just a simplistic example. –  Alin Purcaru Jun 2 '11 at 8:43

You could drop the ALL as others have suggested.

If the two queries use same tables and are different only in the WHERE clause or only in the HAVING clause, you can also use this:

SELECT Title.id, Title.title FROM titles as Title
WHERE (1st query conditions)
   OR (2nd query conditions)

or

SELECT Title.id, Title.title FROM titles as Title
HAVING (1st query conditions)
    OR (2nd query conditions)
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