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I am trying to grab PVS (rendering with line of sight) information from an old game format. It has documentation and I have been able to translate everything into C++ code up to this point. This part however confuses the heck out of me. I spent a few hours today trying to understand where to start but alas, I have nothing. Again, this is only for those that might be up for a challenge or can lend some advice or even pseudocode for how I would accomplish this.

Thank you

Data6 entries (There are Size6 of these):

Data6Size1 : WORD Tells the number of entries in the Data6Data field.

Data6Data : Either BYTEs or WORDs

This is a complicated field. It contains run-length-encoded data that tells the client which regions are “nearby”. The purpose appears to be so that the client can determine which mobs in the zone have to have their Z coordinates checked, so that they will fall to the ground (or until they land on something). Since it’s expensive to do this, it makes sense to only do it for regions that are visible to the player instead of doing it for all mobs in the entire zone (repeatedly).

I’ve only encountered data where the stream is a list of BYTEs instead of WORDs. The following discussion describes RLE encoding a BYTE stream.

The idea here is to form a sorted list of all region IDs that are within a certain distance, and then write that list as an RLE-encoded stream to save space. The procedure is as follows:

  1. Set an initial region ID value to zero.

  2. If this region ID is not present in the (sorted) list, skip forward to the first one that is in the list. Write something to the stream that tells it how many IDs were skipped.

  3. Form a block of consecutive IDs that are in the list and write something to the stream that tells the client that there are this many IDs that are in the list.

  4. If there are more region IDs in the list, go back to step 2.

When writing to the stream, either one or three bytes are written:

  • 0x00..0x3E skip forward by this many region IDs
  • 0x3F, WORD skip forward by the amount given in the following 16-bit WORD
  • 0x40..0x7F skip forward based on bits 3..5, then include the number of IDs based on bits 0..2
  • 0x80..0xBF include the number of IDs based on bits 3..5, then skip forward based on bits 0..2
  • 0xC0..0xFE subtracting 0xC0, this many region IDs are nearby
  • 0xFF, WORD the number of region IDs given by the following WORD are nearby

It should be noted that the values in the range 0x40..0xBF allow skipping and including of no more than seven IDs at a time. Also, they are not necessary to encode a region list: they merely allow better compression.

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Please try to improve the formatting to make the data description clearer. Formatting everything as code, which gives syntax highlitning of words just confuses. Also fix the long line causing the scroll. –  Anders Abel Jun 2 '11 at 8:22
    
Vote to close: Alas, this is isn't a real question, nor a programming one. It's really just "can you take a guess at what this documentation means?". –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 2 '11 at 8:29
    
@Anders Abel Done. Thank you. –  Pladnius Brooks Jun 2 '11 at 8:31
    
@Oli Charlesworth I am sure someone here knows a thing or two about dealing with this stuff. Just wanted to see if anyone had any pointers on what method I should approach the RLE encoded data. –  Pladnius Brooks Jun 2 '11 at 8:32
    
@Oli Charlesworth: it doesn't seem an homework so I gave it a shot. For someone that never got down to the bit level and never implemented an RLE encoding scheme this description can surely look like undecipherable ancient script. What is asked is pretty clear and I'd say it's also a programming question. –  6502 Jun 2 '11 at 9:50
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is my attempt to implement that unpacker. Not tested as there is no example data to test it with... (not even compiled, actually)

std::vector<int> regions(std::vector<unsigned char>& data6)
{
    int rp = 0, sz = data6.size();
    std::vector<int> result;
    int current_id = 0;
    while (rp < sz)
    {
        int c = data6[rp++];
        if (c <= 0x3E)
        {
            // 0x00..0x3E : skip forward by this many region IDs
            current_id += c;
        }
        else if (c == 0x3F)
        {
            // 0x3F WORD skip forward by the amount given in the following 16-bit WORD
            if (rp + 2 > sz) throw std::runtime_error("Invalid data");
            int count = data[rp] + (data[rp + 1] << 8); // (NOTE: May be H/L ?)
            rp += 2;
            current_id += count;
        }
        else if (c <= 0x7F)
        {
            // 0x40..0x7F skip forward based on bits 3..5,
            // then include the number of IDs based on bits 0..2
            int keep = (c & 7);
            int skip = (c >> 3) & 7;
            current_id += skip;
            for (int i=0; i<keep; i++)
                result.push_back(current_id++);
        }
        else if (c <= 0xBF)
        {
            // 0x80..0xBF include the number of IDs based on bits 3..5,
            // then skip the number of IDs based on bits 0..2
            int skip = (c & 7);
            int keep = (c >> 3) & 7;
            for (int i=0; i<keep; i++)
                result.push_back(current_id++);
            current_id += skip;
        }
        else if (c <= 0xFE)
        {
            // 0xC0..0xFE subtracting 0xC0, this many region IDs are nearby
            int keep = c - 0xC0;
            for (int i=0; i<keep; i++)
                result.push_back(current_id++);
        }
        else
        {
            // 0xFF WORD the number of region IDs given by the following WORD are nearby
            if (rp + 2 > sz) throw std::runtime_error("Invalid data");
            int count = data[rp] + (data[rp + 1] << 8); // (NOTE: May be H/L ?)
            rp += 2;
            for (int i=0; i<count; i++)
                result.push_back(current_id++);
        }
    }
    return result;
}

I assumed that WORDs are encoded as low/high, but may be it's the opposite...

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You are a god among men. I will test this out tonight and even if I have to tweak around with it, you have given me a great idea of what I am to be doing. Thank you so much. You have no idea... –  Pladnius Brooks Jun 2 '11 at 22:14
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