Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to search how to pass parameters in a bash function, but what comes up is always how to pass parameter from the command line.

I would like to pass parameters within my script. I tried:

myBackupFunction("..", "...", "xx")


function myBackupFunction($directory, $options, $rootPassword) {
     ...
}

But the syntax is not correct, how to pass parameter to my function?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 421 down vote accepted

There are two typical ways of declaring a function. I prefer the second approach.

function function_name {
   command...
} 

or

function_name () {
   command...
} 

To call a function with arguments:

function_name $arg1 $arg2

The function refers to passed arguments by their position (not by name), that is $1, $2, and so forth. $0 is the name of the script itself.

Example:

function_name () {
   echo "Parameter #1 is $1"
}

Also, you need to call your function after it is declared.

#!/bin/sh

foo 1  # this will fail because foo has not been declared yet.

foo() {
    echo "Parameter #1 is $1"
}

foo 2 # this will work.

Output:

./myScript.sh: line 2: foo: command not found
Parameter #1 is 2

Reference: Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide.

share|improve this answer
3  
Thank you, it works, now I'm going to learn more from that guide. –  stivlo Jun 2 '11 at 9:26
1  
When I write function name(){} I get an error about the '('. But when I write name(){} it works. Any ideas? –  CMCDragonkai Nov 10 '13 at 18:33
    
You have forgotten the spaces, try function name() {}. Maybe with a 'enter' before {} –  lalo Nov 11 '13 at 14:09
1  
I didn't know you could call bash functions without ()! –  Mich Nov 24 '13 at 10:00
3  
Good answer. My 2 cents: in shell constructs that reside in a file that is sourced (dotted) when needed, I prefer to use the function keyword and the (). My goal (in a file, not command line) is to increase clarity, not reduce the number of characters typed, viz, function myBackupFunction() compound-statement. –  Terry Gardner Nov 27 '13 at 17:25

Just to add to what's already been said - if you prefer named parameters, it's possible (with a few tricks) to actually pass named parameters to functions (also makes it possible to pass arrays).

The method I developed allows you to define named parameters passed to a function like this:

testPassingParams() {

    @var hello
    l=4 @array anArrayWithFourElements
    l=2 @array anotherArrayWithTwo
    @var anotherSingle
    @reference table   # references only work in bash >=4.3
    @params anArrayOfVariedSize

    test "$hello" = "$1" && echo correct
    #
    test "${anArrayWithFourElements[0]}" = "$2" && echo correct
    test "${anArrayWithFourElements[1]}" = "$3" && echo correct
    test "${anArrayWithFourElements[2]}" = "$4" && echo correct
    # etc...
    #
    test "${anotherArrayWithTwo[0]}" = "$6" && echo correct
    test "${anotherArrayWithTwo[1]}" = "$7" && echo correct
    #
    test "$anotherSingle" = "$8" && echo correct
    #
    test "${table[test]}" = "works"
    table[inside]="adding a new value"
    #
    # I'm using * just in this example:
    test "${anArrayOfVariedSize[*]}" = "${*:10}" && echo correct
}

fourElements=( a1 a2 "a3 with spaces" a4 )
twoElements=( b1 b2 )
declare -A assocArray
assocArray[test]="works"

testPassingParams "first" "${fourElements[@]}" "${twoElements[@]}" "single with spaces" assocArray "and more... " "even more..."

test "${assocArray[inside]}" = "adding a new value"

In other words, not only you can call your parameters by their names (which makes up for a more readable core), you can actually pass arrays (and references to variables - this feature works only in bash 4.3 though)! Plus, the mapped variables are all in the local scope, just as $1 (and others).

The code that makes this work is pretty light and works both in bash 3 and bash 4 (these are the only versions I've tested it with). If you're interested in more tricks like this that make developing with bash much nicer and easier, you can take a look at my Bash Infinity Framework, the code below was developed for that purpose.

Function.AssignParamLocally() {
    local commandWithArgs=( $1 )
    local command="${commandWithArgs[0]}"

    shift

    if [[ "$command" == "trap" || "$command" == "l="* || "$command" == "_type="* ]]
    then
        paramNo+=-1
        return 0
    fi

    if [[ "$command" != "local" ]]
    then
        assignNormalCodeStarted=true
    fi

    local varDeclaration="${commandWithArgs[1]}"
    if [[ $varDeclaration == '-n' ]]
    then
        varDeclaration="${commandWithArgs[2]}"
    fi
    local varName="${varDeclaration%%=*}"

    # var value is only important if making an object later on from it
    local varValue="${varDeclaration#*=}"

    if [[ ! -z $assignVarType ]]
    then
        local previousParamNo=$(expr $paramNo - 1)

        if [[ "$assignVarType" == "array" ]]
        then
            # passing array:
            execute="$assignVarName=( \"\${@:$previousParamNo:$assignArrLength}\" )"
            eval "$execute"
            paramNo+=$(expr $assignArrLength - 1)

            unset assignArrLength
        elif [[ "$assignVarType" == "params" ]]
        then
            execute="$assignVarName=( \"\${@:$previousParamNo}\" )"
            eval "$execute"
        elif [[ "$assignVarType" == "reference" ]]
        then
            execute="$assignVarName=\"\$$previousParamNo\""
            eval "$execute"
        elif [[ ! -z "${!previousParamNo}" ]]
        then
            execute="$assignVarName=\"\$$previousParamNo\""
            eval "$execute"
        fi
    fi

    assignVarType="$__capture_type"
    assignVarName="$varName"
    assignArrLength="$__capture_arrLength"
}

Function.CaptureParams() {
    __capture_type="$_type"
    __capture_arrLength="$l"
}

alias @trapAssign='Function.CaptureParams; trap "declare -i \"paramNo+=1\"; Function.AssignParamLocally \"\$BASH_COMMAND\" \"\$@\"; [[ \$assignNormalCodeStarted = true ]] && trap - DEBUG && unset assignVarType && unset assignVarName && unset assignNormalCodeStarted && unset paramNo" DEBUG; '
alias @param='@trapAssign local'
alias @reference='_type=reference @trapAssign local -n'
alias @var='_type=var @param'
alias @params='_type=params @param'
alias @array='_type=array @param'
share|improve this answer

Knowledge of high level programming languages (C/C++/Java/PHP/Python/Perl ...) would suggest to the layman that bash functions should work like they do in those other languages. Instead, bash functions work like shell commands and expect arguments to be passed to them in the same way one might pass an option to a shell command (ls -l). In effect, function arguments in bash are treated as positional parameters ($1, $2..$9, ${10}, ${11}, and so on). This is no surprise considering how getopts works. Parentheses are not required to call a function in bash.


(Note: I happen to be working on Open Solaris at the moment.)

# bash style declaration for all you PHP/JavaScript junkies. :-)
# $1 is the directory to archive
# $2 is the name of the tar and zipped file when all is done.
function backupWebRoot ()
{
    tar -cvf - $1 | zip -n .jpg:.gif:.png $2 - 2>> $errorlog && echo -e "\nTarball 
        created!\n"
}


# sh style declaration for the purist in you. ;-)
# $1 is the directory to archive
# $2 is the name of the tar and zipped file when all is done.
backupWebRoot ()
{
    tar -cvf - $1 | zip -n .jpg:.gif:.png $2 - 2>> $errorlog && echo -e "\nTarball 
        created!\n"
}


#In the actual shell script
#$0               $1            $2

backupWebRoot ~/public/www/ webSite.tar.zip
share|improve this answer

Miss out the parens and commas:

 myBackupFunction ".." "..." "xx"

and the function should look like this:

function myBackupFunction() {
   # here $1 is the first parameter, $2 the second etc.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.