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being a Cocoa/Obj-C newbie I am going through the "Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X" book by Aaron Hillegass and - leaving apart the fact that now we have also the chance to use GC to avoid all this reasoning - I am not sure I get the reason for some of those retains.

In particular in one of the examples Aaron gives as good programming practice:

- (void) setFoo:(NSCalendarDate *)x
{
    [x retain];
    [foo release];
    foo = x;
}

I don't get the reason for retaining the x instance at the first line of the method:

[x retain];

The scope of this instance is just the set method, right? When exiting the method scope the x instance should be deallocated anyway no? Besides, when assigning x to foo with:

foo = x;

foo will be anyway pointing to x memory cells and will therefore increment the pointed object retain count, no? This should ensure the memory won't be deallocated.

So, what's the point? I am sure I am missing something, of course, but don't know what exactly.

Thanks, Fabrizio

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On a side note, the code here actually highlights a good practice. It is possible in some scenarios that 'x' and 'foo' may already be pointing to the same object. In that case, if you follow the typical setter flow of '[foo release], then foo = [x retain]', then you are releasing 'x'/'foo' first (), and then retaining it again. If the object's retain count is '1' at the time of calling 'setFoo:', then it means 'x'/'foo' is first dealloced, and THEN the dealloced object is passed a 'retain' message. Following Aaron's flow instead, retaining 'x' first before releasing 'foo', avoids this issue. –  Dev Kanchen Jun 22 '11 at 7:15
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1 Answer

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Retain means: I will be needing this object to stay around, it must not be deallocated. If x wouldn't be retained, the following is likely to happen:

You assign x to foo, so foo now points to the address where your NSCalendarDate is. Someone releases or autoreleases this object, it's retain count eventually drops to 0 and the object is deallocated. Now your foo still points to that address, but there's no longer a valid object. Sometime later, a new object is created and by chance it's situated at the same address than your old NSCalendarDate object. Now your foo points to an entirely different object !

To prevent that, you need to retain it. You need to say, please do not deallocate the object yet, I need it. Once you're done with it, you release it which means I no longer need the object, you can clean it up now if nobody else needs it.

Now for the classical three part assignment. Consider your setFoo: would look like this:

- (void) setFoo:(NSCalendarDate *)x
{
    [foo release];
    [x retain];
    foo = x;
}

This is a very bad idea. Consider your object is the only one who has retained the NSCalendarDate object, and consider you would then do: [self setFoo:foo];. Might sound silly, but something like this can happen. The flow would now be this:

  1. foo would be released. Its retain count might now drop to 0 and the object will get deallocated.
  2. Whoops, we're trying to retain and access a deallocated object.

This is why you always first retain the new object, then release the old object.

If you're coming from a Java or .NET background, it is very important to understand that a variable of type Foo * only contains the address of your object, nothing more. In Java or .NET, a variable that points to an object automatically "retains" it, if you will. Not so in Objective-C (in non-GC environments). You could consider a variable of type Foo * to be a weak reference, and you explicitly need to tell Objective-C whether you will still need that object at that address or not.

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Thank you for your great explanation DarkDust it clears man doubts but the only point I probably didn't make clear in my question is: ain't the line foo = x; going to increase the retain count of the object x points to anyway...? That is why I perceive the forced retain as useless... –  Fabrizio Prosperi Jun 2 '11 at 11:34
    
Oh, I just read again the last part about the weak reference! That's my answer! I wonder why Aaron didn't point that out in bold letters...that's a huge difference from other languages I was used to. Thanks :) –  Fabrizio Prosperi Jun 2 '11 at 11:44
1  
@Fabrizio Prosperi: Maybe Aaron didn't highlight this because of his background. When he wrote the first edition, .NET didn't exist yet and Java was still young. Most of the programmers had a C background then, or maybe Pascal or other procedural languages. The only noteworth GC language was LISP. To these people this variable assignment only copies an address and doesn't do anything else behavior is absolutely natural and doesn't need explanation. Only with the rise of GC-driven languages/environments of the last years this has changed. –  DarkDust Jun 2 '11 at 12:58
    
I see DD, thanks again! –  Fabrizio Prosperi Jun 2 '11 at 13:27
1  
@Shizam: I'm willing to bet money that in your case, the object was also retained elsewhere. In other words, the retain count of your foo argument was not 1 when you ran your setFoo: method. –  DarkDust Jul 28 '11 at 6:14
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