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In JavaScript you can convert a number to a string representation with a specific radix as follows:

(12345).toString(36) // "9ix"

...and you can convert it back to a regular number like this:

parseInt("9ix", 36) // 12345

36 is the highest radix you can specify. It apparently uses the characters 0-9 and a-z for the digits (36 total).

My question: what's the fastest way to convert a number to a base 64 representation (for example, using A-Z, and - and _ for the extra 28 digits)?


Update: Four people have posted responses saying this question is duplicated, or that I'm looking for Base64. I'm not.

"Base64" is a way of encoding binary data in a simple ASCII character set, to make it safe for transfer over networks etc. (so that text-only systems won't garble the binary).

That's not what I'm asking about. I'm asking about converting numbers to a radix 64 string representation. (JavaScript's toString(radix) does this automatically for any radix up to 36; I need a custom function to get radix 64.)


Update 2: Here are some input & output examples...

0   → "0"
1   → "1"
9   → "9"
10  → "a"
35  → "z"
61  → "Z"
62  → "-"
63  → "_"
64  → "10"
65  → "11"
128 → "20"
etc.
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of How can you encode to Base64 using Javascript? –  Andy E Jun 2 '11 at 11:27
    
@Andy E: No it's not, please see my update clarifying. –  callum Jun 3 '11 at 9:27
    
@callum: As numbers are binary data, then yes what you're asking is how do I convert a number to base64 (except you're using a different order, and -_ instead of +/. However, the linked question only converts strings to base64, which doesn't help you. –  Mooing Duck Sep 27 at 16:00
    
Dawns on me you can convert to base 8, and then the transformation from base 8 to base 64 is trivial, each pair of base 8 digits results in a single base64 digit. –  Mooing Duck Nov 11 at 18:02
    
How important is the order of your values->characters? Could we post an answer that uses uppercase-letters, then lowercase-letters, then numeric digits, and then +/ for the last two? –  Mooing Duck Nov 11 at 18:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Here is a sketch for a solution for NUMBERS (not arrays of bytes :)

only for positive numbers, ignores fractional parts, and not really tested -- just a sketch!

Base64 = {

    _Rixits :
//   0       8       16      24      32      40      48      56     63
//   v       v       v       v       v       v       v       v      v
    "0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz+/",
    // You have the freedom, here, to choose the glyphs you want for 
    // representing your base-64 numbers. The ASCII encoding guys usually
    // choose a set of glyphs beginning with ABCD..., but, looking at
    // your update #2, I deduce that you want glyphs beginning with 
    // 0123..., which is a fine choice and aligns the first ten numbers
    // in base 64 with the first ten numbers in decimal.

    // This cannot handle negative numbers and only works on the 
    //     integer part, discarding the fractional part.
    // Doing better means deciding on whether you're just representing
    // the subset of javascript numbers of twos-complement 32-bit integers 
    // or going with base-64 representations for the bit pattern of the
    // underlying IEEE floating-point number, or representing the mantissae
    // and exponents separately, or some other possibility. For now, bail
    fromNumber : function(number) {
        if (isNaN(Number(number)) || number === null ||
            number === Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY)
            throw "The input is not valid";
        if (number < 0)
            throw "Can't represent negative numbers now";

        var rixit; // like 'digit', only in some non-decimal radix 
        var residual = Math.floor(number);
        var result = '';
        while (true) {
            rixit = residual % 64
            // console.log("rixit : " + rixit);
            // console.log("result before : " + result);
            result = this._Rixits.charAt(rixit) + result;
            // console.log("result after : " + result);
            // console.log("residual before : " + residual);
            residual = Math.floor(residual / 64);
            // console.log("residual after : " + residual);

            if (residual == 0)
                break;
            }
        return result;
    },

    toNumber : function(rixits) {
        var result = 0;
        // console.log("rixits : " + rixits);
        // console.log("rixits.split('') : " + rixits.split(''));
        rixits = rixits.split('');
        for (e in rixits) {
            // console.log("_Rixits.indexOf(" + rixits[e] + ") : " + 
                // this._Rixits.indexOf(rixits[e]));
            // console.log("result before : " + result);
            result = (result * 64) + this._Rixits.indexOf(rixits[e]);
            // console.log("result after : " + result);
        }
        return result;
    }
}

UPDATE: Here's some (very lightweight) testing of the above, for running in NodeJs where you have console.log.

function testBase64(x) {
    console.log("My number is " + x);
    var g = Base64.fromNumber(x);
    console.log("My base-64 representation is " + g);
    var h = Base64.toNumber(g);
    console.log("Returning from base-64, I get " + h);
    if (h !== Math.floor(x))
        throw "TEST FAILED";
}

testBase64(0);
try {
    testBase64(-1);
    }
catch (err) {
    console.log("caught >>>>>>  " + err);
    }
try {
    testBase64(undefined);
    }
catch (err) {
    console.log("caught >>>>>>  " + err);
    }
try {
    testBase64(null);
    }
catch (err) {
    console.log("caught >>>>>>  " + err);
    }
try {
    testBase64(Number.NaN);
    }
catch (err) {
    console.log("caught >>>>>>  " + err);
    }
try {
    testBase64(Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY);
    }
catch (err) {
    console.log("caught >>>>>>  " + err);
    }
try {
    testBase64(Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY);
    }
catch (err) {
    console.log("caught >>>>>>  " + err);
    }

for(i=0; i<100; i++)
    testBase64(Math.random()*1e14);
share|improve this answer
    
As an added bonus, your code is lightning fast. I had been using node.js' Buffer encoding/decoding to turn an integer into a base-64 number and back, and tests showed your Base64.fromNumber() to be twice as fast, and Base64.toNumber() was ten times as fast! –  Paul d'Aoust Nov 15 '11 at 22:27
    
(note: my problem was different from callum's -- I didn't care whether the end result was Base64-encoded or radix 64; I just needed a tiny string representation of an integer. But I just wanted to share my results for those who also don't care.) –  Paul d'Aoust Nov 15 '11 at 22:31
    
+1 also for explaining how to modify the code to suit any size of radix and any set of symbols. –  Paul d'Aoust Nov 15 '11 at 22:34
1  
scratch that -- Base64.fromNumber() is five times as fast, and Base64.toNumber() is six times as fast. Smoking! Quite surprised that Buffers aren't as efficient, since in node.js they're written in C. –  Paul d'Aoust Nov 15 '11 at 22:49
1  
@Pauld'Aoust I should clarify; there can be a lot of overhead in bridging the Node barrier, mostly due to V8's internals. The power of Node comes from its core modules and extremely efficient reactor pattern, not to mention dynamic compilation. I use Node every day and love it, but I just wanted to give you realistic expectations around C++ bindings. (take a look at the markdown modules for node, the fastest is written in pure javascript) –  skeggse Dec 5 '13 at 17:56

Well, you could just use any Javascript Base64 library: perhaps this question answers it?

EDIT: Binary data is essentially just a sequence of bytes. If you assume the bytes represent a single number you can represent the sequence of bytes as a base 64 string. Decode them and do some trivial math on the bytes to get a number. Convert the number to a sequence of bytes and encode to get a string. Seems quite reasonable, unless you are somehow invested in the specific characters used in the String.

share|improve this answer
2  
I can never understand why people post answers that say "the answers to this question answer your question" instead of voting/flagging duplicates. –  Andy E Jun 2 '11 at 11:30
1  
No, I don't want to encode binary data with "Base64", I want to represent a number in radix 64 form. Please look at my question again. –  callum Jun 3 '11 at 9:20
1  
Similar solutions do not equal duplicate questions. As a rather trite example: the "answer" to "heart valve replacement" may be "open heart surgery", which may also be the "answer" to "heart transplant". This does not mean the questions are the same. –  Femi Jun 3 '11 at 17:23
    
@callum: Base64 is a way to represent a number in radix 64 form. The only difference is the symbols you've chosen for each value. –  Mooing Duck Sep 27 at 16:02

I was looking for a solution to the same problem, but for ActionScript (AS3), and it was evident that many persons confuse Base64 encode with 'numbers in base 64' (radix 64).

The vast majority of sites offer solutions for 'computational cryptography' and not mathematics. As solutions, this are not useful for the conversion that we needed.

Prior to this consultation, and knew the methods toString (radix) and parseInt (radix), I was worked with Hex numbers (radix 16) in both colors, and other features.

However, neither in AS3 or JS there exists a numerical method for transformations to and from radix 64.

Before coming to this site I found:

  1. In various online calculators, radix 64 not starting from scratch, but A.
    Eg: convertix.com & alfredo4570.net
  2. In radix 64 is formed by the following sets of ordered characters: AZ, az, 0-9, + and / (these I have defined a constant: STR64)

To avoid confusion with cryptographic methods, the methods to be used are based on well-known names:

  • toString / to64String
  • parseInt / to64Parse

The code was be wrote in AS3, but is very clear (common with JS).

NOTE: Recommended use with number under: 1 * 1016

At the end, an example and results of operations are included.

const STR64:Array = ('ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/').split( '' );

// TRANSFORM NUMBERS BETWEEN radix 10 AND radix 64
/** Methods based on answers shared in:
* @url   http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6213227/fastest-way-to-convert-a-number-to-radix-64-in-javascript
*/

// METHODS 
/** to64String: Method to transform a radix 10 number to radix 64 number (as string)
* @param input   Number for transform to radix 64 (as String)
* @param current String data (don't needed in request)
* @return String Number in radix 64 as String;
*
* @based http://stackoverflow.com/users/383780/monocle
* @based base64( Method for number to string - NOT string part )
*/
function to64String( input:Number, current:String = '' ):String
{
    if ( input < 0 && current.length == 0 ){
        input = input * - 1;
    }
    var modify:Number = input % 64;
    var remain:Number = Math.floor( input / 64 );
    var result:String = STR64[ modify ] + current;
    return ( remain <= 0 ) ? result : to64String( remain, result );
}

/** to64Parse: Method for transform a number in radix 64 (as string) in radix 10 number
* @param input   Number in radix 64 (as String) to transform in radix 10
* @return Number in radix 10
*
* @based http://stackoverflow.com/users/520997/reb-cabin
* @based Base64.toNumber( Method for string to number )
*/
function to64Parse ( input:String ):Number
{
    var result:Number = 0;
    var toProc:Array  = input.split( '' );
    var e:String;
    for ( e in toProc ){
        result = ( result * 64 ) + STR64.indexOf( toProc[ e ] );
    }
    return result;
}

// TEST
var i:int = 0;
var max:Number = 1000000000000;
var min:Number = 0;
for ( i == 0; i < 20; i++ ){
    var num:Number = ( Math.ceil( Math.random() * ( max - min + 1 ) ) + min );
    var s64:String = to64String( num );
    var ret:Number = to64Parse ( s64 );
    trace( i + '\t# ' + num + '\t' + s64 + '\t' + ret + '\t' + ( ret == num ) )
}

// TEST RESULT
/*
0   # 808936734685  LxYYv/d 808936734685    true
1   # 931332556532  NjXvwb0 931332556532    true
2   # 336368837395  E5RJSMT 336368837395    true
3   # 862123347820  Mi6jk9s 862123347820    true
4   # 174279278611  CiT2sAT 174279278611    true
5   # 279361353722  EELO/f6 279361353722    true
6   # 435602995568  GVr9jlw 435602995568    true
7   # 547163526063  H9lfNOv 547163526063    true
8   # 188017380425  CvGtYxJ 188017380425    true
9   # 720098771622  KepO0Km 720098771622    true
10  # 408089106903  F8EAZnX 408089106903    true
11  # 293941423763  ERwRi6T 293941423763    true
12  # 383302396164  Fk+mmkE 383302396164    true
13  # 695998940618  KIMxQXK 695998940618    true
14  # 584515331314  IgX1CTy 584515331314    true
15  # 528965753970  Hso0Nxy 528965753970    true
16  # 5324317143    E9WqHX  5324317143      true
17  # 772389841267  LPWBalz 772389841267    true
18  # 954212692102  N4rgjCG 954212692102    true
19  # 867031893694  MnfIMa+ 867031893694    true
*/
share|improve this answer

Here's a different take

function base64(value) {
  if (typeof(value) === 'number') {
    return base64.getChars(value, '');
  }

  if (typeof(value) === 'string') {
    if (value === '') { return NaN; }
    return value.split('').reverse().reduce(function(prev, cur, i) {
      return prev + base64.chars.indexOf(cur) * Math.pow(64, i);
    }, 0);
  }
}

base64.chars = "0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz-_";

base64.getChars = function(num, res) {
  var mod = num % 64,
      remaining = Math.floor(num / 64),
      chars = base64.chars.charAt(mod) + res;

  if (remaining <= 0) { return chars; }
  return base64.getChars(remaining, chars);
};
share|improve this answer

In a mozilla or webkit browser you can use btoa() and atob() to encode and decode base64.

share|improve this answer
1  
No, that's a method for encoding an arbitrary string of binary digits using only basic ASCII bytes. I'm asking about representing a number in radix 64. –  callum Jun 3 '11 at 9:26

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