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Lets say that I have a

class Dictionary
{
vector<string> words;  
void addWord(string word)//adds to words
{
/...
}
bool contains(string word)//only reads from words
{
//...
}
}

Is there a way to make compiler check that contains isnt changing words vector. Ofc this is just an example with one class data member, I would like it to work with any number of data members. P.S. I know i have no public: and private:, I left it out intentionally to make code shorter and problem clearer.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

If you want the compiler to enforce this, then declare the member function const:

bool contains(string word) const
{
    ...
}

A const function is not allowed to modify its member variables, and can only call other const member functions (either its own, or those of its member variables).

The exception to this rule is if the member variable is declared as mutable. [But mutable should not be used as a general-purpose const workaround; it's only really meant for when situations where the "observable" state of an object should be const, but internal implementation (such as reference-counting or lazy evaluation) still needs to change.]

Note also that const does not propagate through e.g. pointers.

So in summary:

class Thingy
{
public:
    void apple() const;
    void banana();
};

class Blah
{
private:
    Thingy t;
    int *p;
    mutable int a;

public:
    Blah() { p = new int; *p = 5; }
    ~Blah() { delete p; }

    void bar() const {}
    void baz() {}

    void foo() const
    {
        p = new int;  // INVALID: p is const in this context
        *p = 10;      // VALID: *p isn't const

        baz();        // INVALID: baz() is not declared const
        bar();        // VALID: bar() is declared const

        t.banana();   // INVALID: Thingy::banana() is not declared const
        t.apple();    // VALID: Thingy::apple() is declared const

        a = 42;       // VALID: a is declared mutable
    }
};
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1  
+1 for the pointer thing, as the const only applies to the top-level (i.e., can't change the pointer itself, only the pointee). –  Xeo Jun 2 '11 at 10:36
1  
like Xeo said very cool example with ponters...+1 ofc :) –  NoSenseEtAl Jun 2 '11 at 10:44
1  
actually you should have mentioned about mutable keyword –  Konstantin Chugalinskiy Jun 2 '11 at 10:52
1  
+1 good post. Add also few sentences for mutable keyword. The post would look more complete then. –  Nawaz Jun 2 '11 at 10:55
1  
@Konstantin, @Nawaz: Good point about mutable; I've updated my answer! –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 2 '11 at 11:06

Mark them as const:

bool contains(string word) const
//                        ^^^^^^

Another positive thing: You can only call other const member functions! :) Yet another good thing: You're allowed to call those functions on const objects of your class, example:

void foo(const Dictionary& dict){
  // 'dict' is constant, can't be changed, can only call 'const' member functions
  if(dict.contains("hi")){
    // ...
  }
  // this will make the compiler error out:
  dict.addWord("oops");
}
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1  
wow, cpp is awesome(although i know of const I never understood it beyond unmodifiable variable). tnx –  NoSenseEtAl Jun 2 '11 at 10:41

Usually declaring the method as "const" achieves this:

bool contains(string word) const
// ...

The compiler will tell you if you use any method on the class members that is not also const. Note also that you could pass the string by reference to avoid copying (making the word parameter std::string const&).

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declare your function as const:

void addWord(string word) const { /... }

If you try to change any members inside the body, the compiler will give an error. Also note that inside a method declared const, you can't call other methods that are not declared const.

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Make the member function const:

bool contains(string word) const
{
//...
}
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