Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have such hierarchy:

class Sphere;
class Cube;
class SpherePair;

class Entity {};

class Cube : public Entity {
public:
  list<Sphere*> spheres_;
};

class Sphere : public Entity {
public:
  Cube       *cube;
  SpherePair *spherepair;
};

class SpherePair : public Entity {
public:
  Sphere *first;
  Sphere *second;
};

What I want is to make a clone of Cube object and all the objects connected to it (Sphere, SpherePair, Cube).

Cube has Spheres inside, each Sphere is a half of SpherePair object. SpherePair points to Spheres which are in separate Cubes or in one same Cube.

This is needed for proper Undo functionality.

I would also like to have a map of old and cloned entities:

std::map<Entity*, Entity*> old_new;

Added: Before these circular references I had a simple clone functionality:

class Entity {
 public:
  virtual Entity* clone() = 0;
}

It was used in such a scheme:

std::vector<Entity*> selected_objects_;

void move(const vec3f &offset) {
  document->beginUndo();

  for(int i = 0; i < selected_objects_.size(); ++i) {
    Entity *cloned = selected_objects_[i]->clone();

    cloned->move(offset);

    selected_objects_[i]->setDeleted(true);
    document->pushToUndo(selected_objects_[i]);
    document->addEntity(cloned);
  }

  document->endUndo();
}
share|improve this question
1  
what did you wrote so far? What problem did you get? – Alessandro Teruzzi Jun 2 '11 at 12:18
    
so far I created a method: virtual Entity* cloneDeep(map<Entity*, Entity*> *old_new); But I'm worried about infinite recursions and adding excessive Spheres into a Cube. So I thought there should be some standard solution for this. I can paste my code here or in pastie.org. – geotavros Jun 2 '11 at 12:55
    
Are circular reference possible or they are always an error? Also, are you sure about your design? What are you trying to model? There are a lot of memory leak in your code, you should use the shared_ptr instead of the naked pointer. – Alessandro Teruzzi Jun 2 '11 at 14:49
1  
Circular reference is a normal condition. Sphere::spherepair and SpherePair::first is what I call a circular reference. I'm trying to model a behavior when moving cube move spheres in it. Spheres are connected in pairs so deleting one sphere should delete another sphere in the other cube. Please, don't pay attention to memory leaks. It's just a sample code of what I'm trying to do. – geotavros Jun 2 '11 at 15:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I will post the entire code block as an answer:

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <map>

#include <assert.h>

using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::list;
using std::make_pair;
using std::map;
using std::pair;

class Cube;
class Sphere;
class SpherePair;

class Entity {
 public:
  virtual ~Entity() {}
  virtual Entity* clone() { return 0; }
  virtual Entity* cloneDeep(map<Entity*, Entity*> *old_new) { return 0; }

 protected:
  bool cloneAndPush(Entity *e, map<Entity*, Entity*> *old_new) {
    if (0 != old_new->count(e)) {
      return false;                             // already cloned
    }

    typedef pair<map<Entity*, Entity*>::iterator, bool> insert_result;
    Entity *cloned = e->clone();
    insert_result inserted = old_new->insert(std::make_pair(e, cloned));
    assert(inserted.second);
    return inserted.second;
  }
};

class Sphere : public Entity {
public:
  Sphere() {
    cout << "constructor Sphere" << endl;
  }
  virtual ~Sphere() {
    cout << "destructor Sphere" << endl;
  }
  virtual Entity* clone();
  virtual Entity* cloneDeep(map<Entity*, Entity*> *old_new);

  Cube       *cube;
  SpherePair *spherepair;
};

class Cube : public Entity {
 public:
  Cube() {
    cout << "constructor Cube" << endl;
  }
  virtual ~Cube() {
    cout << "destructor Cube" << endl;
  }
  virtual Entity* clone() {
    cout << "clone Cube" << endl;
    Cube *c = new Cube(*this);
    c->spheres_.clear();
    return c;
  }

  virtual Entity* cloneDeep(map<Entity*, Entity*> *old_new) {
    if (cloneAndPush(this, old_new)) {
      Cube *c = static_cast<Cube*>((*old_new)[this]);
      for(list<Sphere*>::iterator i = spheres_.begin(); i != spheres_.end(); ++i) {
        c->addSphere(static_cast<Sphere*>((*i)->cloneDeep(old_new)));
      }
    }

    return old_new->operator[](this);
  }

  void addSphere(Sphere *s) {
    spheres_.push_back(s);
  }

  void delSphere(Sphere *s) {
      spheres_.remove(s);
  }

  list<Sphere*> spheres_;
};

class SpherePair : public Entity {
 public:
  SpherePair() {
    cout << "constructor SpherePair" << endl;
  }
  virtual ~SpherePair() {
    cout << "destructor SpherePair" << endl;
    delete first;
    delete second;
  }

  virtual Entity* clone() {
    cout << "clone SpherePair" << endl;
    return new SpherePair(*this);
  }

  virtual Entity* cloneDeep(map<Entity*, Entity*> *old_new) {
    if (cloneAndPush(this, old_new)) {
      SpherePair *s = static_cast<SpherePair*>((*old_new)[this]);
      s->first = (Sphere*)first->cloneDeep(old_new);
      s->second = (Sphere*)second->cloneDeep(old_new);
    }

    return (*old_new)[this];
  }

  Sphere *first;
  Sphere *second;
};

Entity* Sphere::clone() {
  cout << "clone Sphere" << endl;
  return new Sphere(*this);
}

Entity* Sphere::cloneDeep(map<Entity*, Entity*> *old_new) {
  if (cloneAndPush(this, old_new)) {
    Sphere *s = static_cast<Sphere*>((*old_new)[this]);
    s->cube = (Cube*)cube->cloneDeep(old_new);
    s->spherepair = (SpherePair*)spherepair->cloneDeep(old_new);
  }

  return (*old_new)[this];
}

inline void populateListSimpleCase(list<Entity*> *ents) {
  Cube *first_cube = new Cube;
  Cube *second_cube = new Cube;
  // Cube *third_cube = new Cube;
  ents->push_back(first_cube);
  ents->push_back(second_cube);

  for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
    Sphere *first_cube_spheres = new Sphere;
    Sphere *second_cube_spheres = new Sphere;
    first_cube->addSphere(first_cube_spheres);
    first_cube_spheres->cube = first_cube;

    second_cube->addSphere(second_cube_spheres);
    second_cube_spheres->cube = second_cube;

    SpherePair *sp = new SpherePair;
    sp->first = first_cube_spheres;
    sp->second = second_cube_spheres;
    ents->push_back(sp);
    first_cube_spheres->spherepair = sp;
    second_cube_spheres->spherepair = sp;
  }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
  list<Entity*> ent_list;
  populateListSimpleCase(&ent_list);

   map<Entity*, Entity*> old_new;
   (*ent_list.begin())->cloneDeep(&old_new);

  for (list<Entity*>::iterator i = ent_list.begin(); i != ent_list.end(); ++i){
    delete (*i);
  }
  ent_list.clear();

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

As for your general question: regard the structure as a graph with in-memory objects as vertices and pointers as edges. Walk the structure in a depth-first manner. Keep a map, initially empty, of addresses of nodes in the old structure to addresses of nodes in the new structure, by shallow-copying the structure and setting the pointers one-by-one. Stop recursion every time you encounter a substructure whose address has already been seen (is in the map).

However...

This is needed for proper Undo functionality.

I'm not sure I get your point, but you don't need circular references for undo. Use a circular buffer instead (which is really just a flat array with a few flags and pointers) and use structure sharing, if possible, to keep the memory requirements down.

If you meant you need the deep copy for undo, then I still recommend you consider some kind of "flat" graph representation for your objects. Pointer structures are great for trees and DAGs, but very confusing when used for general graphs.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't want that Undo confuse you. Let it pass. Here is my code: link. Is it what you've advised? – geotavros Jun 2 '11 at 13:58
    
I have enhanced the code to properly copy data members' pointers. Seems to be working. However a bunch of unit test is needed, I think. And the code is ugly with those static_casts :( – geotavros Jun 2 '11 at 15:41

You could view this as a special case of serialization and deserialization. You serialize the object you want to copy into a bytestream and then deserialize it into a new object. This C++ FAQ has some good hints on how to serialize more and more complex object graphs: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/serialization.html\

I always refer back to here when I need to do something similar.

share|improve this answer

Not sure if this is what you want, but here goes cloning a graph(with or without circular references)

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
using namespace std;

struct Thing{
 int length;
 int id;
 Thing *things[];
};

Thing* deepCopy(Thing *aThing,map<Thing*, Thing*> &aMap){

 Thing *newThing = new Thing();
 newThing->length = aThing->length;
 newThing->id = aThing->id;
 for(int i = 0 ;i < aThing->length;i++){
      auto it1 = aMap.find(aThing->things[i]);
      if(it1 == aMap.end()){
         aMap.insert(pair<Thing*,Thing*>(aThing,newThing));
         newThing->things[i] = deepCopy(aThing->things[i],aMap);
      }else{
         newThing->things[i] = it1->second;
      }
 }
 return newThing;    
}

int main(){

 Thing *aThing1 = new Thing();
 Thing *aThing2 = new Thing();
 Thing *aThing3 = new Thing();


 //////INITIALIZE GRAPH ///////// You can ignore this block
 aThing1->length = 2;
 aThing1->id = 1;
 aThing2->length = 2;
 aThing2->id = 2;
 aThing3->length = 1;
 aThing3->id = 3;
 aThing1->things[0] = aThing2; 
 aThing1->things[1] = aThing3; 
 aThing2->things[0] = aThing1; 
 aThing2->things[1] = aThing3; 
 aThing3->things[0] = aThing2; 
 //////END INITIALIZE GRAPH ///////// You can ignore this block
 map<Thing*,Thing*> aMap;
 Thing *myNewThing = deepCopy(aThing1,aMap);
 return 0;
}

I got this in a interview and I struggled a bit to get it right. I got really close to the solution, but I used a set instead of a map, so retrieval was a little difficult.

The only important part is the deepCopy method. The rest is just boilerplate code.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.