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I am having 2 tables with a relation of one to many

For example take example of student and performance tables. Here a student and performance tables have one to many relationship

Student: enter image description here

Performance: enter image description here

Now i have to write a stored procedure which takes input as multiple student id, student name and section details as datatable and tells whether all the records passed in datatable have the same values for percentage, subject id, other activities in performance table or not .

Any suggestions are helpful

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2  
Prepare for feedback on the terrible design of the tables. The Student table is completely pointless since you include ALL of that data in your Performance table. You really should be normalizing this. –  JNK Jun 2 '11 at 12:14
    
Its an example i provided to relate my business scenario –  Sandeep Polavarapu Jun 2 '11 at 12:26
    
@Sandeep - do your real tables have similar duplication? –  JNK Jun 2 '11 at 12:27
    
Yes my DB is in denormalized state, as it supports my requirement –  Sandeep Polavarapu Jun 2 '11 at 12:37
    
@Sandeep - if it's denormalized to THIS DEGREE than it's poor design, no matter what the requirement –  JNK Jun 2 '11 at 12:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This query returns no rows if all the students queried have got identical data:

WITH StudentCount AS (
  SELECT COUNT(*) AS Cnt
  FROM Students
),
RowDataCounts AS (
  SELECT
    p.Percentage,
    p.SubjectId,
    p.OtherActivities,
    Cnt = COUNT(*)
  FROM Performance p
    INNER JOIN Student s
       ON p.StudentID = s.StudentID
      AND p.Name = s.Name
      AND p.Section = s.Section
  GROUP BY
    p.Percentage,
    p.SubjectId,
    p.OtherActivities
)
SELECT r.*
FROM RowDataCounts r
  LEFT JOIN StudentCounts s ON r.Cnt = s.Cnt
WHERE s.Cnt IS NULL

If not all the data are identical across all the students, the query will return rows showing the actual pieces of data that aren't the same, as well as how many students have that information.

If you need to use the entire query in a condition like IF EXISTS (…), just transform the CTEs to conventional subselects, i.e. like this:

SELECT r.*
FROM ( … /* the RowDataCounts subquery here */ ) r
  INNER JOIN ( … /* the StudentCount subquery here */ ) s ON r.Cnt = s.Cnt
WHERE s.Cnt IS NULL

UPDATE

Here's a simplified version of the same solution:

SELECT
  p.Percentage,
  p.SubjectId,
  p.OtherActivities,
  Cnt = COUNT(*)
FROM Performance p
  INNER JOIN Student s
     ON p.StudentID = s.StudentID
    AND p.Name = s.Name
    AND p.Section = s.Section
GROUP BY
  p.Percentage,
  p.SubjectId,
  p.OtherActivities
HAVING COUNT(*) <> (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Students)
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Thanks a lot Andriy, its working like a charm –  Sandeep Polavarapu Jun 2 '11 at 14:38
    
@Sandeep: Updated my answer with a simpler version. –  Andriy M Jun 2 '11 at 15:48

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