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Well, i am still confused about objective c properties and instance variables. I create a LocationManager-object in my viewDidLoad. On the one hand the LocationMan is just an instance variable on the other hand it is declared as a property. Have a look at the examples:

First example:

Header:

CLLocationManager* _locationMan;

Implementation:

CLLocationManager* theManager = [[[CLLocationManager alloc] init] autorelease];
_locationMan = theManager;
_locationMan.delegate = self;

Second Example

Header:

CLLocationManager* _locationMan;
@property (retain, nonatomic) CLLocationManager* locationMan;

Implementation:

self.locationMan = [[[CLLocationManager alloc] init] autorelease];
self.locationMan.delegate = self;

Whats the difference between those examples except of that the second one is working and the first one not? What's going on there with the memory management?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem you have in your first example:

CLLocationManager* theManager = [[[CLLocationManager alloc] init] autorelease];

is caused by the use of autorelease. autorelease can be seen as meaning: at some point in the near future, release automatically this object. Given the way autorelease is implemented, by means of a release pool, this usually happens the next time the control flow return to the main loop and the release pool is emptied.

So, in your first case, you are creating the object and storing it in your ivar; but soon it will be released, and since you don't have explicitly retained it anywhere else, it will end up being deallocated. When you access it after that, you get the error. If you had not used autorelease, everything would have worked correctly:

CLLocationManager* theManager = [[CLLocationManager alloc] init]; //-- this is correct
_locationMan = theManager;  //-- because you assign directly to the ivar

In your second example, creation is just the same, meaning, the object will also be flagged for autorelease. But, in this case, you assign it to a property which has got the retain modifier. This means that the object will be automatically retained when assigning to the property. So, when the autorelease is actually done (when you get back to the main look, roughly), your object will have already had its retain count incremented by 1; then auto releasing it will not make its retain count go to 0, and the object will not be deallocated.

What you have to know clearly is that:

  1. alloc will set the retain count to 1;

  2. retain properties will increment the retain count when assigning to them;

  3. autorelease is like a delayed release, so that in the mean time (before the release is actually done, which means in the rest of your method and callers up to the main loop) you can use the object safely and thereafter it will be released.

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Got it. Thank you very much. –  shadowhorst Jun 2 '11 at 14:28

I marked the changes of the retains in your code, maybe it will become more clear.

CLLocationManager* theManager = [[[CLLocationManager alloc] init] autorelease];
                                                     ^^^^^ + 1    ^^^^^^^^^^^ - 1 = 0
_locationMan = theManager;

when your retains drop to 0 the object doesn't exist anymore. Next time you try to access it your app crashs. Because of the autorelease this will happen after your autorelease pool gets drained, at an unknown point in the future after you have left the current method.


self.locationMan = [[[CLLocationManager alloc] init] autorelease];
    ^ + 1                               ^^^^^ + 1    ^^^^^^^^^^^ - 1 = +1

you have still retained that object. You have to release it later but you can access it without problems.

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Thank you. So the difference is the accessor-method generated by the property. Using the setter method increases the retain count. Thank you very much for your nice explanation. –  shadowhorst Jun 2 '11 at 14:26

In the first instance, you aren't going through the synthesized setter, which takes care of retaining the object. In which case, when theManager is autoreleased _locationManager is not holding on to anything, so theManager gets dealloced.

The second case uses the synthesized setter (since it calls it through self) so it retains theManager after it is autoreleased.

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