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I'm learning clojure and I've written a small function that given a directory pathname returns a sorted-map of files in descending order according to their mtimes. Here it is:

(defn get-sorted-mtimes [dir]      
  (loop [sm (sorted-map-by >)
         lst (for [f (.listFiles (File. dir))]
               (let [k (.lastModified f)
                     v (.getName f)]
                 [k v]))]
    (if (seq lst)
      (recur (assoc sm ((first lst) 0) ((first lst) 1))
        (rest lst))
      sm)))

My question is: is there a way to pass the comparator method as a symbol name to the function and make it sort by asc or desc order accordingly? I mean something like:

(defn get-sorted-mtimes [dir <sym>]  
  (loop [sm (sorted-map-by <sym>)
       ...

Also, is there a more clojuresque way of accomplishing this task?

Well, for the record, this is the final form of the function that does exactly what I need it to:

(defn get-sorted-mtimes [dir comp]      
  (loop [sm (sorted-map-by (comparator comp))
         lst (for [f (.listFiles (File. dir))]
               (let [k (.lastModified f)
                     v (.getName f)]
                 [k v]))]
    (if (seq lst)
      (recur (assoc sm ((first lst) 0) ((first lst) 1))
        (rest lst))
      sm)))

If the (comparator) function isn't used, you get a java.lang.ClassCastException exception.

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1  
I'm not entirely sure what <sym> is, but if it is just a function, it should work exactly as you suggest... –  Adrian Mouat Jun 2 '11 at 12:51
    
I used <sym> as a placeholder for the symbol to be used –  kliron Jun 2 '11 at 13:45
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

> is just a function like any other in Clojure. So there is nothing to stop you passing it as an argument.

In fact I'd say that is good Clojure style to do it this way. Clojure is a functional programming language at heart, so there's nothing wrong with using higher order functions where appropriate!

Some other minor suggestions:

  • Use comparator instead of <sym> as a name for your function parameter. I think that's more descriptive and also more consistent with Clojure's normal naming conventions.
  • You could also add another function parameter to determine what you are comparing so that you can pass a function like get-mtime (a simple function that returns the mtime of a file).
  • I would suggest making a sequence of files the input to the function rather than a directory. Then your function is more general and can del with things like e.g. recursive directory scans in exactly the same manner
  • I'd suggest using (into sm lst) - much simpler than your big loop/if/recur construct!

Then you can do really nice things like (get-sorted-files (list-files-recursive dir) > get-mtime) - or any similar combinations you can think of!

share|improve this answer
    
I know I can pass the symbol > as any other clojure function, -that is if the symbol is hard coded into the body of my function. What I'm trying to do is pass a ">" or "<" string as a function parameter and have the function sort accordingly. This fails with the following error: java.lang.ClassCastException: java.lang.String cannot be cast to java.util.Comparator. When I use (symbol sym) to cast it, I get this error: java.lang.ClassCastException: clojure.lang.Symbol cannot be cast to java.util.Comparator –  kliron Jun 2 '11 at 13:58
    
I just figured what you meant. By using (comparator ...) instead of (symbol ...) it worked perfectly. Thank you! –  kliron Jun 2 '11 at 14:06
    
Why do you want to pass ">" as a String? I'd just pass the function as > directly, e.g. as in (get-sorted-mtimes dir >) ... or am I missing something?? –  mikera Jun 2 '11 at 14:07
    
Ok great! by the way I think you don't even need the (comparator ...) bit either. –  mikera Jun 2 '11 at 14:08
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