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I'm trying to set a timeout on an HTTP client that uses http.request with no luck. So far what I did is this:

var options = { ... }
var req = http.request(options, function(res) {
  // Usual stuff: on(data), on(end), chunks, etc...
}

/* This does not work TOO MUCH... sometimes the socket is not ready (undefined) expecially on rapid sequences of requests */
req.socket.setTimeout(myTimeout);  
req.socket.on('timeout', function() {
  req.abort();
});

req.write('something');
req.end();

Any hints?

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1  
Found this answer (it works too) but I wonder if there is something different for http.request() stackoverflow.com/questions/6129240/… –  Claudio Jun 2 '11 at 13:22

4 Answers 4

Using your code, the issue is that you haven't waited for a socket to be assigned to the request before attempting to set stuff on the socket object. It's all async so:

var options = { ... }
var req = http.request(options, function(res) {
  // Usual stuff: on(data), on(end), chunks, etc...
});

req.on('socket', function (socket) {
    socket.setTimeout(myTimeout);  
    socket.on('timeout', function() {
        req.abort();
    });
});

req.write('something');
req.end();

The 'socket' event is fired when the request is assigned a socket object.

share|improve this answer
    
This make total sense, indeed. The problem is that now I can't test this particular issue (time passes...). So I can only upvote the answer for now :) Thank you. –  Claudio Mar 29 '12 at 13:07
    
No worries. Keep in mind this only works on the latest version of node as far as I know. I tested on a previous version (5.0.3-pre) I think and it didn't fire the socket event. –  Rob Evans Mar 29 '12 at 16:21
1  
The other way to handle this is to use a bog-standard setTimeout call. You'll need to keep hold of the setTimeout id with: var id = setTimeout(...); so that you can cancel it if you recieve an on data etc. A good way is to store it in the request object itself then clearTimeout if you get some data. –  Rob Evans Mar 29 '12 at 16:23
1  
You're missing ); at the end of req.on. Since it's not 6 characters, I can't edit it for you. –  JR Smith May 7 at 15:57
    
@JRSmith LOL how right you are! Updated. :) –  Rob Evans May 8 at 12:55

At this moment there is a method to do this directly on the request object:

request.setTimeout(timeout, [callback]);

This is a shortcut method that binds to the socket event and then creates the timeout.

Reference: Node.js v0.8.8 Manual & Documentation

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2  
request.setTimeout "sets the socket to timeout after timeout milliseconds of inactivity on the socket." Me thinks this question is about timing out the request regardless of activity. –  ajostergaard Jan 20 '13 at 14:00

The Rob Evans anwser works correctly for me but when I use request.abort(), it occurs to throw a socket hang up error which stays unhandled.

I had to add an error handler for the request object :

var options = { ... }
var req = http.request(options, function(res) {
  // Usual stuff: on(data), on(end), chunks, etc...
}

req.on('socket', function (socket) {
    socket.setTimeout(myTimeout);  
    socket.on('timeout', function() {
        req.abort();
    });
}

req.on('error, function(err) {
    if (err.code === "ECONNRESET") {
        console.log("Timeout occurs");
        //specific error treatment
    }
    //other error treatment
});

req.write('something');
req.end();
share|improve this answer

Curious, what happens if you use straight net.sockets instead? Here's some sample code I put together for testing purposes:

var net = require('net');

function HttpRequest(host, port, path, method) {
  return {
    headers: [],
    port: 80,
    path: "/",
    method: "GET",
    socket: null,
    _setDefaultHeaders: function() {

      this.headers.push(this.method + " " + this.path + " HTTP/1.1");
      this.headers.push("Host: " + this.host);
    },
    SetHeaders: function(headers) {
      for (var i = 0; i < headers.length; i++) {
        this.headers.push(headers[i]);
      }
    },
    WriteHeaders: function() {
      if(this.socket) {
        this.socket.write(this.headers.join("\r\n"));
        this.socket.write("\r\n\r\n"); // to signal headers are complete
      }
    },
    MakeRequest: function(data) {
      if(data) {
        this.socket.write(data);
      }

      this.socket.end();
    },
    SetupRequest: function() {
      this.host = host;

      if(path) {
        this.path = path;
      }
      if(port) {
        this.port = port;
      }
      if(method) {
        this.method = method;
      }

      this._setDefaultHeaders();

      this.socket = net.createConnection(this.port, this.host);
    }
  }
};

var request = HttpRequest("www.somesite.com");
request.SetupRequest();

request.socket.setTimeout(30000, function(){
  console.error("Connection timed out.");
});

request.socket.on("data", function(data) {
  console.log(data.toString('utf8'));
});

request.WriteHeaders();
request.MakeRequest();
share|improve this answer
    
If I use the socket timeout, and I issue two requests one after another (without waiting the first to finish), the second request has the socket undefined (at least at the moment I try to set the timeout).. maybe there should be something like on("ready") on the socket... I don't know. –  Claudio Jun 2 '11 at 17:18
    
@Claudio Can you update your code to show multiple request being made? –  onteria_ Jun 2 '11 at 17:25
1  
Of course... it's a bit long and I used paste2.org if this is not a problem: paste2.org/p/1448487 –  Claudio Jun 2 '11 at 17:42
    
@Claudio Hmm okay, setting up a test environment and writing some test code is going to take about, so my reply might come sometime tomorrow (Pacific Time) as an FYI –  onteria_ Jun 2 '11 at 17:53
    
Too kind of you :) Thanks –  Claudio Jun 2 '11 at 18:52

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