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I use an extension method to convert float arrays into byte arrays:

public static unsafe byte[] ToByteArray(this float[] floatArray, int count)
{
    int arrayLength = floatArray.Length > count ? count : floatArray.Length;
    byte[] byteArray = new byte[4 * arrayLength];
    fixed (float* floatPointer = floatArray)
    {
        fixed (byte* bytePointer = byteArray)
        {
            float* read = floatPointer;
            float* write = (float*)bytePointer;
            for (int i = 0; i < arrayLength; i++)
            {
                *write++ = *read++;
            }
        }
    }
    return byteArray;
}

I understand that an array is a pointer to memory associated with information on the type and number of elements. Also, it seems to me that there is no way of doing a conversion from and to a byte array without copying the data as above.

Have I understood this? Would it even be impossible to write IL to create an array from a pointer, type and length without copying data?

EDIT: Thanks for the answers, I learned some fundamentals and got to try out new tricks!

After initially accepting Davy Landman's answer I found out that while his brilliant StructLayout hack does convert byte arrays into float arrays, it does not work the other way around. To demonstrate:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
struct UnionArray
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public Byte[] Bytes;

    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public float[] Floats;
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    // From bytes to floats - works
    byte[] bytes = { 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 };
    UnionArray arry = new UnionArray { Bytes = bytes };
    for (int i = 0; i < arry.Bytes.Length / 4; i++)
        Console.WriteLine(arry.Floats[i]);

    // From floats to bytes - index out of range
    float[] floats = { 0.1f, 0.2f, 0.3f };
    arry = new UnionArray { Floats = floats };
    for (int i = 0; i < arry.Floats.Length * 4; i++)
        Console.WriteLine(arry.Bytes[i]);
}

It seems that the CLR sees both arrays as having the same length. If the struct is created from float data, the byte array's length is just too short.

share|improve this question
    
Apart from the question, your first statement would be clearer if you used Math.Min(count, floatArray.Length) –  Hosam Aly Mar 7 '09 at 9:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, the type information and data is in the same memory block, so that is impossible unless you overwrite the type information in a float array to fool the system that it's byte array. That would be a really ugly hack, and could easily blow up...

Here's how you can convert the floats without unsafe code if you like:

public static byte[] ToByteArray(this float[] floatArray) {
	int len = floatArray.Length * 4;
	byte[] byteArray = new byte[len];
	int pos = 0;
	foreach (float f in floatArray) {
		byte[] data = BitConverter.GetBytes(f);
		Array.Copy(data, 0, byteArray, pos, 4);
		pos += 4;
	}
	return byteArray;
}
share|improve this answer
    
And if you're interested in the suggested hack, check out the implementation in my answer below: stackoverflow.com/questions/621493/… –  Omer Mor Aug 31 '10 at 12:41

You can use a really ugly hack to temporary change your array to byte[] using memory manipulation.

This is really fast and efficient as it doesn't require cloning the data and iterating on it.

I tested this hack in both 32 & 64 bit OS, so it should be portable.

The source + sample usage is maintained at https://gist.github.com/1050703 , but for your convenience I'll paste it here as well:

public static unsafe class FastArraySerializer
{
    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
    private struct Union
    {
        [FieldOffset(0)] public byte[] bytes;
        [FieldOffset(0)] public float[] floats;
    }

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 1)]
    private struct ArrayHeader
    {
        public UIntPtr type;
        public UIntPtr length;
    }

    private static readonly UIntPtr BYTE_ARRAY_TYPE;
    private static readonly UIntPtr FLOAT_ARRAY_TYPE;

    static FastArraySerializer()
    {
        fixed (void* pBytes = new byte[1])
        fixed (void* pFloats = new float[1])
        {
            BYTE_ARRAY_TYPE = getHeader(pBytes)->type;
            FLOAT_ARRAY_TYPE = getHeader(pFloats)->type;
        }
    }

    public static void AsByteArray(this float[] floats, Action<byte[]> action)
    {
        if (floats.handleNullOrEmptyArray(action)) 
            return;

        var union = new Union {floats = floats};
        union.floats.toByteArray();
        try
        {
            action(union.bytes);
        }
        finally
        {
            union.bytes.toFloatArray();
        }
    }

    public static void AsFloatArray(this byte[] bytes, Action<float[]> action)
    {
        if (bytes.handleNullOrEmptyArray(action)) 
            return;

        var union = new Union {bytes = bytes};
        union.bytes.toFloatArray();
        try
        {
            action(union.floats);
        }
        finally
        {
            union.floats.toByteArray();
        }
    }

    public static bool handleNullOrEmptyArray<TSrc,TDst>(this TSrc[] array, Action<TDst[]> action)
    {
        if (array == null)
        {
            action(null);
            return true;
        }

        if (array.Length == 0)
        {
            action(new TDst[0]);
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }

    private static ArrayHeader* getHeader(void* pBytes)
    {
        return (ArrayHeader*)pBytes - 1;
    }

    private static void toFloatArray(this byte[] bytes)
    {
        fixed (void* pArray = bytes)
        {
            var pHeader = getHeader(pArray);

            pHeader->type = FLOAT_ARRAY_TYPE;
            pHeader->length = (UIntPtr)(bytes.Length / sizeof(float));
        }
    }

    private static void toByteArray(this float[] floats)
    {
        fixed(void* pArray = floats)
        {
            var pHeader = getHeader(pArray);

            pHeader->type = BYTE_ARRAY_TYPE;
            pHeader->length = (UIntPtr)(floats.Length * sizeof(float));
        }
    }
}

And the usage is:

var floats = new float[] {0, 1, 0, 1};
floats.AsByteArray(bytes =>
{
    foreach (var b in bytes)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(b);
    }
});
share|improve this answer
2  
There is a newer, more portable "one year later" version of this answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/3577253/11545 . @Omer - maybe update this answer too? –  Cristi Diaconescu Jun 12 '13 at 13:58
    
Here, done! :-) –  Omer Mor Jun 12 '13 at 19:15
    
Thanks! :) +1 Btw you should add a license to that code. CodingHorror explains why –  Cristi Diaconescu Jun 13 '13 at 7:32
    
You're right. I added a FreeBSD license to the gist. The code in SO already has a license. Check the footer: "user contributions licensed under cc-wiki with attribution required" –  Omer Mor Jun 13 '13 at 10:50

This question is the reverse of What is the fastest way to convert a float[] to a byte[]?.

I've answered with a union kind of hack to skip the whole copying of the data. You could easily reverse this (length = length *sizeof(Double).

share|improve this answer

I've written something similar for quick conversion between arrays. It's basically an ugly proof-of-concept more than a handsome solution. ;)

public static TDest[] ConvertArray<TSource, TDest>(TSource[] source)
    where TSource : struct
    where TDest : struct {

    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");

        var sourceType = typeof(TSource);
        var destType = typeof(TDest);

        if (sourceType == typeof(char) || destType == typeof(char))
            throw new NotSupportedException(
                "Can not convert from/to a char array. Char is special " +
                "in a somewhat unknown way (like enums can't be based on " +
                "char either), and Marshal.SizeOf returns 1 even when the " +
                "values held by a char can be above 255."
            );

        var sourceByteSize = Buffer.ByteLength(source);
        var destTypeSize = Marshal.SizeOf(destType);
        if (sourceByteSize % destTypeSize != 0)
            throw new Exception(
                "The source array is " + sourceByteSize + " bytes, which can " +
                "not be transfered to chunks of " + destTypeSize + ", the size " +
                "of type " + typeof(TDest).Name + ". Change destination type or " +
                "pad the source array with additional values."
            );

        var destCount = sourceByteSize / destTypeSize;
        var destArray = new TDest[destCount];

        Buffer.BlockCopy(source, 0, destArray, 0, sourceByteSize);

        return destArray;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    public byte[] ToByteArray(object o)
    {
        int size = Marshal.SizeOf(o);
        byte[] buffer = new byte[size];
        IntPtr p = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(size);
        try
        {
            Marshal.StructureToPtr(o, p, false);
            Marshal.Copy(p, buffer, 0, size);
        }
        finally
        {
            Marshal.FreeHGlobal(p);
        }
        return buffer;
    }

this may help you to convert an object to a byte array.

share|improve this answer

You should check my answer to a similar question: What is the fastest way to convert a float[] to a byte[]?.

In it you'll find portable code (32/64 bit compatible) to let you view a float array as a byte array or vice-versa, without copying the data. It's the fastest way that I know of to do such thing.

If you're just interested in the code, it's maintained at https://gist.github.com/1050703 .

share|improve this answer

Well - if you still interested in that hack - check out this modified code - it works like a charm and costs ~0 time, but it may not work in future since it's a hack allowing to gain full access to the whole process address space without trust requirements and unsafe marks.

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
    struct ArrayConvert
    {
        public static byte[] GetBytes(float[] floats)
        {
            ArrayConvert ar = new ArrayConvert();
            ar.floats = floats;
            ar.length.val = floats.Length * 4;
            return ar.bytes;
        }
        public static float[] GetFloats(byte[] bytes)
        {
            ArrayConvert ar = new ArrayConvert();
            ar.bytes = bytes;
            ar.length.val = bytes.Length / 4;
            return ar.floats;
        }

        public static byte[] GetTop4BytesFrom(object obj)
        {
            ArrayConvert ar = new ArrayConvert();
            ar.obj = obj;
            return new byte[]
            {
                ar.top4bytes.b0,
                ar.top4bytes.b1,
                ar.top4bytes.b2,
                ar.top4bytes.b3
            };
        }
        public static byte[] GetBytesFrom(object obj, int size)
        {
            ArrayConvert ar = new ArrayConvert();
            ar.obj = obj;
            ar.length.val = size;
            return ar.bytes;
        }

        class ArrayLength
        {
            public int val;
        }
        class Top4Bytes
        {
            public byte b0;
            public byte b1;
            public byte b2;
            public byte b3;
        }

        [FieldOffset(0)]
        private Byte[] bytes;
        [FieldOffset(0)]
        private object obj;
        [FieldOffset(0)]
        private float[] floats;

        [FieldOffset(0)]
        private ArrayLength length;

        [FieldOffset(0)]
        private Top4Bytes top4bytes;
    }
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