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How can I get the accurate file size in MB? I tried this:

compressed_file_size = File.size("Compressed/#{project}.tar.bz2") / 1024000

puts "file size is #{compressed_file_size} MB"

But it chopped the 0.9 and showed 2 MB instead of 2.9 MB

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5  
separate from the float vs int problem - is 1024000 really the constant you want? Usually MB is 2^20, which is 1048576. –  Jeff Paulsen Jun 2 '11 at 14:33
    
Thanks for the note. I fixed that in my code. –  emurad Jun 2 '11 at 14:46
    
Depending on how fully-featured you want this, the source for Rails' ActionView::Helpers::NumberHelper#number_to_human_size is a good reference implementation. apidock.com/rails/ActionView/Helpers/NumberHelper/… –  CaptainPete Apr 20 '13 at 10:58
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3 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Try:

compressed_file_size = File.size("Compressed/#{project}.tar.bz2").to_f / 2**20
formatted_file_size = '%.2f' % compressed_file_size

One-liner:

compressed_file_size = '%.2f' % (File.size("Compressed/#{project}.tar.bz2").to_f / 2**20)

or:

compressed_file_size = (File.size("Compressed/#{project}.tar.bz2").to_f / 2**20).round(2)

Further information on %-operator of String: http://ruby-doc.org/core-1.9/classes/String.html#M000207


BTW: I prefer "MiB" instead of "MB" if I use base2 calculations (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mebibyte)

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You're doing integer division (which drops the fractional part). Try dividing by 1024000.0 so ruby knows you want to do floating point math.

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I don't even use Ruby and that was exactly what I was going to suggest. –  JAB Jun 2 '11 at 14:31
    
This too. It's giving me 2.8679921875 MB I just want 2.86 MB –  emurad Jun 2 '11 at 14:46
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Try:

compressed_file_size = File.size("Compressed/#{project}.tar.bz2").to_f / 1024000
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That's giving me 2.8679921875 MB I just want 2.86 MB –  emurad Jun 2 '11 at 14:45
1  
You can use compressed_file_size.round(2) or '.2f' % compressed_file_size on output –  Hck Jun 2 '11 at 14:50
    
I didn't get '.2f' % compressed_file_size on output. Please clarify. –  emurad Jun 2 '11 at 14:56
    
puts "file size is #{'.2f' % compressed_file_size} MB" –  Hck Jun 2 '11 at 15:01
    
Try: formatted_file_size = '%.2f' % compressed_file_size -- there was a "%" missing in the format string. Further information on %-operator of String: (ruby-doc.org/core-1.9/classes/String.html#M000207) –  asaaki Jun 2 '11 at 15:03
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