Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Python process on one Linux machine server1 that receives and processes raw UDP packets. I want to have another Linux machine server2 capable of listening to the same UDP packets server1 is receiving.

Is there any Python solution capable of sniffing UDP packets addressed to the another (Linux) machine?

share|improve this question
    
The traffic goes through a couple of unmanaged switches so I can't do much from the networking side. How about adding a python process on the same server: server1? Is that possible to have multiple Python processes listening to the same UDP packets on the same port number on the same machine? –  avatar Jun 2 '11 at 15:05
    
No- only a single process can listen to a socket. but you can have something listen to the socket and send the data to multiple other subprocesses. either on the same machine or other machines. What kind of data is it? –  tMC Jun 2 '11 at 15:17
    
It's a UDP packet with about 150 text characters inside it. –  avatar Jun 2 '11 at 15:25
1  
If you want the processes on different machines (you think one machine can't do it all) I would have a Linux machine receive the data, and using iptables, send it to multiple other machines. Maybe to a different socket on the same machine. This is possible because its UDP. If you want it all on the same machine, I would have a single process that spawns subprocesses with connected PIPEs, binds the UDP socket and copies the data to each subprocess' pipe; maybe after some input validation. –  tMC Jun 2 '11 at 16:53
1  
I didn't read though it all but this might help: bjou.de/blog/2008/05/… I think you're looking for the --tee flag / target. –  tMC Jun 2 '11 at 17:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want more than one machine to process the same data, you'd be better off going to mulitcast (if you can control the sender and the infrastructure)

Else, http://sourceforge.net/projects/pylibpcap/ will enable packet capture via python. You will still have to configure the infrastructure to get the packets to the machine you want to sniff them. Either by iptables (if is a Linux machine) or a mirror port on the switch etc.

Edit:

If you want the processes on different machines (you think one machine can't do it all) I would have a Linux machine receive the data, and using iptables, send it to multiple other machines. Maybe to a different socket on the same machine. This is possible because its UDP. If you want it all on the same machine, I would have a single process that spawns subprocesses with connected PIPEs, binds the UDP socket and copies the data to each subprocess' pipe; maybe after some input validation

share|improve this answer
    
+1: I was forgetting that he's using UDP. Multicast could be a good option –  Heisenbug Jun 2 '11 at 14:53

This not depends on Python but on your network architecture. If server1 and server2 are connected (probably they are) through a switch then you can't do it, because the packet passing through the router will be sent only to the requested IP.

So first of all, tell us how is composed your network architecture. Where are server1 and server2? How the reach each other?

Your problem solution won't depend neither on your OS nor in the language used. Anyway, you tagged your question "linux", so I think you are familiar with that OS. If this is the case, and server1 and server2 access the LAN through the same router, you can evaluate the possibility of installing linux on your router (have a look at openwrt), and perform the sniffing and whatever from the router itself.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 since any solution is really going to be about network architecture, not programming... –  ig0774 Jun 2 '11 at 14:43
    
Although ARP spoofing can be used to sniff on switches. –  Douglas Leeder Jun 2 '11 at 14:45
    
If its a managed switch, most of them have a mirror port option. You setup a mirror port and can sniff all the traffic from the configured mirror port. –  tMC Jun 2 '11 at 14:48
    
@Douglas Leeder. yes it can, but it isn't a proper solution but just an hack. That way one of the two server will act like the router itself..so.. –  Heisenbug Jun 2 '11 at 14:49

I have had a similar problem, and wrote a small python script to forward incoming udp packets to multiply hosts. A drawback here is ofcourse that you loose the source IP of the originating udp packets.

import socket
import sys, time, string

def sendUDP(remotehost,remoteport,UDPSock,data):
    UDPSock.sendto( data, (remotehost,remoteport))

def serverLoop(listenport,remotes):
    # Set up socket
    UDPSock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET,socket.SOCK_DGRAM)
    UDPSock.bind( ("0.0.0.0",listenport) )
    while 1:
        data, addr = UDPSock.recvfrom(1024)
        if not data: pass
        else:
            sys.stdout.write(".") ; sys.stdout.flush()
            # Send udp packet to remotes...
            for remote in remotes:
                sendUDP(remote[0],remote[1],UDPSock,data)
        time.sleep(0.001)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    if len(sys.argv) < 3:
        print "%s listenport remotehost1:port1 remotehostN:portN ..." % sys.argv[0]
        sys.exit(-1)
    listenport = int(sys.argv[1])
    print "Local foward port %d" % listenport
    remotes = []
    for pair in sys.argv[2:]:
        host,port = string.split(pair,":")
        remotes.append( (host,int(port)) )
        print "Adding remote forward %s:%s" % (host,port)
    print "Starting serverloop"
    serverLoop(listenport,remotes)
share|improve this answer
    
I wrote something similar and I did lose the originating IP as you said. In my case I need the originating IP since I need to communicate back. Any ideas how to solve the IP issue? –  avatar Jun 18 '11 at 16:09
    
Just noticed a vulnerability in this code. You have to check if the originating ip is one of the address:port in remotes, or else you might have a feedback loop which will exhaust your resources –  Dog eat cat world Jun 18 '11 at 16:11
    
@itgorilla, you put the originating ip address in the data; data = struct.pack("!LH",ip2long(addr),port) + data, then unpack it on the receiving part. Another way is to spoof the source address, but require superuser privileges. –  Dog eat cat world Jun 18 '11 at 16:12
    
That's what I thought I should do also.Thank you! –  avatar Jun 18 '11 at 16:14
    
take a look at sk89q.com/2008/10/spoofing-a-udp-packet-in-python Be aware that you might have some trouble with ip-spoofing filtering routers/firewalls. –  Dog eat cat world Jun 18 '11 at 16:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.