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I am solving problems from htdp.org. I would like to know in scheme which is a better practice to evaluate long expressions having a common operator like '+' or '*'.

Example :

> (* 1 10 10 2 4)                 ; Version A
> (* 1 (* 10 (* 10 (* 2 4))))     ; Version B

Should I follow A or B. Also I please consider the above example for algebraic expressions like surface area of cylinder.

-Abhi

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Is there more context to this? If this is a problem around evaluation of more complicated statements, then there may be value in doing one over the other. –  Keen Jun 2 '11 at 18:48
    
In Scheme, arithmetic operators are not quite binary, so the two expressions are equivalent. It is up to you to decide which form is better. –  Artyom Shalkhakov Jun 3 '11 at 2:56

2 Answers 2

The real question should be, do they produce different results? Let's try in our REPL:

>> (* 1 10 10 2 4)
800
>> (* 1 (* 10 (* 10 (* 2 4))))
800
>> 

Since they're essentially the same (using your example), I'd opt for going with lower ceremony / noise in the code. Use the first one.

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1  
The first one is easier to read, and many Scheme evaluators will treat them equivalently. –  John Clements Jun 2 '11 at 16:46
    
Thanks for the info. Appreciate it ! –  abhi09 Jun 4 '11 at 16:06

A bit of a followup on this. (* a b c ...) is not necessarily equivalent to (* (* a b) ...) when you're talking about timing.

Some implementations may recognize the common operation, but try timing these two definitions of factorial:

(define (f1 n)
  (let loop ((up 2)
             (down n)
             (a 1))
    (cond ((> up down) a)
          ((= up down) (* a up))
          (else
           (loop (+ 1 up) (- 1 down)
                 (* a up down))))))

(define (f2 n)
  (let loop ((up 2)
             (down n)
             (a 1))
    (cond ((> up down) a)
          ((= up down) (* a up))
          (else
           (loop (+ 1 up) (- 1 down)
                 (* a (* up down)))))))

The second procedure is considerably faster than the first for me.

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thats a good example, thanks 'Anonymous'. The fact that creating an extra parentheses in the second procedure for solving the multiple expression in the last statement leads to faster processing - sounds great. Will definitely try it on Dr Racket. –  abhi09 Jun 15 '11 at 12:03

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