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I have two solutions

  • SolutionA.sln
    • WebApplication1.csproj
  • SolutionB.sln
    • WebApplication1.csproj
    • WebApplication2.csproj

I also have two TFS 2010 build configurations

  • BuildConfigA
    • should build SolutionA and deploy WebApplication1
  • BuildConfigB
    • should build SolutionB and deploy WebApplication2 (but not WebApplication1)

To prevent BuildConfigB from trying to deploy WebApplication1, I put a <DeployOnBuild>false</DeployOnBuild> in WebApplication1.csproj. But that also prevents BuildConfigA from deploying it. How could I accomodate this scenario?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is what I ended up deciding to do. I now have three solutions

  • SolutionA.sln
    • WebApplication1.csproj
  • SolutionB.sln
    • WebApplication1.csproj
    • WebApplication2.csproj
  • SolutionC.sln
    • WebApplication2.csproj

I do most of my development in SolutionB because I like being able to easily reference and compile against both projects. I don't use SoluctionC at all other than as part of the following two build configurations

  • BuildConfigA
    • should build SolutionA and deploy WebApplication1
  • BuildConfigB
    • should build SolutionC and deploy WebApplication2 (and not WebApplication1 of course)
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Hmm I'm pretty sure a build configuration can also build+deploy single projects, not necessarily solutions. So you could also drop sln A and sln C, and point your builds directly to the csproj files.

Ohad

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Would the downvoter care to comment? –  tsemer Jul 16 '13 at 14:51

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