Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm experiencing a weird problem with stringstream.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "iostream"
#include "sstream"

using namespace std;

struct Test
{
    float f;
};

wstringstream& operator <<( wstringstream& sstream , const Test& test )
{
    sstream << test.f;
    return sstream;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Test a;
    a.f = 1.2f;

    wstringstream ss;
    ss << L"text" << a << endl; // error C2679!
    ss << a << L"text" << endl; // it works well..

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

The problem is here:

ss << L"text" << a << endl; // error C2679!
ss << a << L"text" << endl; // it works well..

The only difference between these two statements is argument order. Why does the first statement fail whereas the second one works?

share|improve this question
3  
Some people that are not familiar with VS would surely appreciate the full error message together with the error code C2679 in this case. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 2 '11 at 17:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Short answer

The problem is that ss << L"text" gives you a std::wostream, not a std::wstringstream.

You only created an operator<< for std::wstringstream, so the next operation (which you're trying to do on a) fails.

Long answer

When you write something like

ss << L"text" << a << endl;

you are not invoking a function with four arguments.

You are, in fact, chaining multiple operations:

((ss << L"text") << a) << endl;

This works because each operator<< operation returns a reference to the original stream object, so that you can continue chaining further operations on in this manner.

But because iostreams form an inheritance hierarchy, and because operator<< is applicable to any output stream, the return type from your operation on wstringstream is something a little less specific than wstringstream.

In fact, ss << L"text" evaluates to a wostream& (wostream being one of wstringstream's base classes). The reference still refers to the same, original stream object... but it has a base class type.

So, your second operation involving a has the following active operands:

  • a wostream& (on the LHS)
  • a Test (on the RHS)

But you have no wostream& operator<<(wostream&, Test const&). You only created a wstringstream& operator<<(wstringstream& sstream, Test const& test), so there's no match.

So, in fact, when creating an operator<< for wide iostreams you should make it work for all wostreams (clearly there is no reason to limit it to wstringstreams):

wostream& operator<<(wostream& sstream, Test const& test)
{
    sstream << test.f;
    return sstream;
}

Going further, why limit yourself to wide streams? Why not normal ones too?

template<typename CharT, typename TraitsT>
std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitsT>&
operator<<(std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitsT>& sstream, Test const& test)
{
    sstream << test.f;
    return sstream;
}

Now you will be able to stream objects of your Test class into wostreams, ostreams, and all their descendants, properly.

share|improve this answer

Don't restrict your operator<< only to working with wstringstream, write it so it will work with any wide stream:

std::wostream& operator <<(std::wostream& sstream, Test const& test)
{
    return sstream << test.f;
}

or with any stream (wide or narrow):

template<typename CharT, typename TraitsT>
std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitsT>&
operator <<(std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitsT>& sstream, Test const& test)
{
    return sstream << test.f;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Yes. The problem is that ss << L"text" gives you a std::wostream, not a std::wstringstream. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 2 '11 at 17:22
    
Absolutely this is the answer. –  Puppy Jun 2 '11 at 17:22
    
Yes but it does need filling out. It doesn't explain why the problem occurs. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 2 '11 at 17:28
    
@Tomalak : While I agree that an explanation of the underlying problem here is warranted for a "complete" answer, I don't have time to type a thorough explanation at the moment. If a separate answer is provided explaining the "why" I'd be happy to vote it up. –  ildjarn Jun 2 '11 at 17:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.