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I want to display some content one after another in new line such that the 1st div is left aligned, 2nd is right aligned, 3rd div is left aligned and 4th is again right aligned.

I wrote HTML/CSS code for it based on relative-absolute positioning. However all of my div's are getting overlapped. Please tell what I am doing wrong as per the concept of relative-absolute positioning?

     <html>
     <head>
     <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="styles.css" />
     </head>
     <body>
     <div class='topContainer'>
       <div class='leftContent'>This div should be left aligned</div> 
     </div>
     <div class='topContainer'>
       <div class='rightContent'>This div should be right aligned</div>
     </div>
     <div class='topContainer'>
       <div class='leftContent'>This div should be left aligned</div>
     </div>
     <div class='topContainer'>
       <div class='rightContent'>This div should be right aligned</div>
     </div>
     </body>
     </html>

Code for the CSS:-

     .topContainer{
      position:relative;
      width:600px;
      }

      .leftContent{
      padding:5px;
      background: rgba(255,255,255,0.8);
      width: 390px;
      margin:10px;
      left:1px;
      position:absolute; 
      }

      .rightContent{
      padding:5px;
      background:rgba(255,255,255,0.4)
      width: 390px;
      margin:10px;
      right:1px;
      position:absolute;
      }

Sorry for not making the question clear.

Adding the layout structure. The layout I want to create is like:-

      This div should be left aligned
           This div should be right aligned
      This div should be left aligned
           This div should be right aligned
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2 Answers 2

You can do it like this instead. It's alot simpler:

<html>
    <head>
        <style type="text/css" media="screen">
            .container{
                width:600px;
                background:#fa2;
            }

            .column{
                background: rgba(255,255,255,0.8);
                width: 290px;
                height: 200px;
                background: #222;
                margin-right: 10px;
                float: left;
            }
            .clear {
                clear: both;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div class='container'>
            <div class='column'>This div should be left aligned</div> 
            <div class='column'>This div should be right aligned</div>
            <div class='column'>This div should be left aligned</div>
            <div class='column'>This div should be right aligned</div>
        </div>
        <div class="clear"> </div>
    </body>
</html>

Basically the column containers is 290+10 px wide and they are floated to the left, meaning that there will only be room for two columns per row, since the parent container is 600px wide.

It's a simpler solution to the problem.

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You can use overflow:hidden on the container and do away with the extra markup required for the clearing div. –  ScottE Jun 2 '11 at 18:08
    
Hm, but that does feel like a hack. I wouldn't go for that solution unless I know for sure that it work without any side effects in IE6+. –  Fredrik Jun 2 '11 at 18:10
    
In this case, it would work out fine, without clearing at all in fact. But what would happen if I don't clear if I would add markup just before </body>. Even with overflow: hidden; I would get a pretty weird layout (I think). Normally I use the famous clearfix hack: positioniseverything.net/easyclearing.html meaning that the only "extra markup" would be <div class="container clearfix"> but in this case it's a bit overkill imo. –  Fredrik Jun 2 '11 at 18:15
    
overflow:hidden is not always the best solution, but it works just fine in most cases. I prefer it to empty markup such as above, especially if you're targeting older browsers that don't understand :after usage, for example. –  ScottE Jun 2 '11 at 19:15

Your container is 600px, but each div is 410px (including the margin) wide. With each being 1px from the left or right side, each div takes up 411px. Total - 822px. So, they will overlap in the middle.

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