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#define a b
#define b c
#define c d
main()
{
    int a=192;
    printf("%d\n",a);
    printf("%d\n",b);
    printf("%d\n",c);
    printf("%d\n",d);
}

output is 192 for all. How a,b,c are declared?

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2  
Why do you think this should give an error? –  Howard Jun 2 '11 at 18:08
    
Prior to any compilation int a=192 will be replaced by int d=192 i suppose ... –  sunny Jun 2 '11 at 18:12
    
C or C++? Pick one. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 2 '11 at 18:12
    
Yea, and all the output lines will look like printf("%d\n",d); –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 2 '11 at 18:12
    
and all the lines will read printf("%d\n",d); (replace a,b,c by d) and thus everything is fine. –  Howard Jun 2 '11 at 18:13

4 Answers 4

when you use a macro, you are telling the pre processor to replace the identifier (in your case, a, b, c) with the expression following the macro.

So that series of defines, tells the preprocessor to replace the contents of a with b, replace the contents of b with c, and replace the contents of c with d.

so what you get, is the same value being printed for times

main()
{
    int d = 192;
    printf("%d\n", d);
    printf("%d\n", d);
    printf("%d\n", d);
    printf("%d\n", d);
}
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3  
Actually the pre-processor doesn't care about variables. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 2 '11 at 18:13
    
That's right @Tomalak, thanks for catching that jargon mixup - they're actually called identifiers. Thank you –  Eytan Jun 2 '11 at 18:18

The resulting code is

main()
{
    int d=192;
    printf("%d\n",d);
    printf("%d\n",d);
    printf("%d\n",d);
    printf("%d\n",d);
}

which will of course print the same value four times.

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yeah it was a sily q. Thanks everyone –  sunny Jun 3 '11 at 4:46

In your defines you are saying to the compiler to substitute a->b, b->c, c->d in the end you are substituting everything with d

So your result code (after the preprocessor) is:

main()
{
    int d=192;
    printf("%d\n",d);
    printf("%d\n",d);
    printf("%d\n",d);
    printf("%d\n",d);
}
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Have you looked at the output of the preprocessor?

Hint: What do you think the line

int a=192;

looks like after the preprocessing stage?

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