Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

To commemorate the public launch of Stack Overflow, what's the shortest code to cause a stack overflow? Any language welcome.

ETA: Just to be clear on this question, seeing as I'm an occasional Scheme user: tail-call "recursion" is really iteration, and any solution which can be converted to an iterative solution relatively trivially by a decent compiler won't be counted. :-P

ETA2: I've now selected a “best answer”; see this post for rationale. Thanks to everyone who contributed! :-)

share

locked by K̨̩̭͚̘̗̻̞͈͖̙͙e̗̦̼̳̣̦͜͡v̢̝̟̗̱̯͉ Nov 16 '11 at 1:28

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site, so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. More info: help center.

closed as not constructive by bmargulies, K̨̩̭͚̘̗̻̞͈͖̙͙e̗̦̼̳̣̦͜͡v̢̝̟̗̱̯͉ Nov 16 '11 at 1:25

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Hope you like my new entry. One byte, and faster overflow than befunge... stackoverflow.com/questions/62188/stack-overflow-code-golf/… –  Adam Davis Feb 28 '09 at 2:19

131 Answers 131

Complete Delphi program.

program Project1;
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
uses SysUtils;

begin
  raise EStackOverflow.Create('Stack Overflow');
end.
share

JavaSript:

Huppies answer to one line:

(function i(){ i(); })()

Same amount of characters, but no new line :)

share

There was a perl one already, but this is a couple characters shorter (9 vs 12) - and it doesn't recurse :)

s//*_=0/e

share

Shell script solution in 10 characters including newlines:

Well, technically not stack overflow but logically so, if you consider spawning a new process as constructing a new stack frame.

#!sh
./so

Result:

antti@blah:~$ ./so
[disconnected]

Whoops. Note: don't try this at home

share

so.c in 15 characters:

main(){main();}

Result:

antti@blah:~$ gcc so.c -o so
antti@blah:~$ ./so
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

Edit: Okay, it gives warnings with -Wall and does not cause a stack overflow with -O2. But it works!

share

In assembly language (x86 processors, 16 or 32 bit mode):


call $

which will generate:

  • in 32 bit mode: 0xe8;0xfb;0xff;0xff;0xff

  • in 16 bit mode: 0xe8;0xfd;0xff

in C/C++:


int main( ) {
  return main( );
}
share

TCL:

proc a {} a

I don't have a tclsh interpreter that can do tail recursion, but this might fool such a thing:

proc a {} "a;a"
share

PowerShell

$f={&$f};&$f

"The script failed due to call depth overflow. The call depth reached 1001 and the maximum is 1000."

share

won't be the shortest but I had to try something... C#

string[] f = new string[0]; Main(f);

bit shorter

static void Main(){Main();}
share

Here's another Ruby answer, this one uses lambdas:

(a=lambda{a.call}).call
share

Java (complete content of X.java):

class X {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    main(null);
}}

Considering all the syntactic sugar, I am wondering if any shorter can be done in Java. Anyone?

EDIT: Oops, I missed there is already almost identical solution posted.

EDIT 2: I would say, that this one is (character wise) the shortest possible

class X{public static void main(String[]a){main(null);}}

EDIT 3: Thanks to Anders for pointing out null is not optimal argument, so it's shorter to do:

class X{public static void main(String[]a){main(a);}}
share

Vb6


Public Property Let x(ByVal y As Long)
  x = y
End Property

Private Sub Class_Initialize()
  x = 0
End Sub
share

Short solution in K&R C, could be compiled:

main(){main()}

14 bytes

share

False:

[1][1]#

(False is a stack language: # is a while loop that takes 2 closures, a conditional and a body. The body is the one that causes the overflow).

share

in perl:

`$0`

As a matter of fact, this will work with any shell that supports the backquote-command syntax and stores its own name in $0

share

I have a list of these at Infinite Loop on E2 - see just the ones indicated as "Stack Overflow" in the title.

I think the shortest there is

[dx]dx

in dc. There may be a shorter solution in False.

EDIT: Apparently this doesn't work... At least on GNU dc. Maybe it was on a BSD version.

share

In Haskell

fix (1+)

This tries to find the fix point of the (1+) function (λ n → n + 1) . The implementation of fix is

fix f = (let x = f(x) in x)

So

fix (1+)

becomes

(1+) ((1+) ((1+) ...))

Note that

fix (+1)

just loops.

share

A better lua solution:

function c()c()end;

Stick this into SciTE or an interactive command prompt and then call it. Boom!

share

CMD overflow in one line

echo @call b.cmd > b.cmd & b
share

In response to the Y combinator comment, i might as well through in the Y-combinator in the SKI calculus:

S (K (S I I)) (S (S (K S) K) (K (S I I)))

There aren't any SKI interpreters that i know of but i once wrote a graphical one in about an hour in actionscript. I would be willing to post if there is interest (though i never got the layout working very efficiently)

read all about it here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SKI_combinator_calculus

share

GNU make:

Create a file called "Makefile" with the following contents:

a:
    make

Then run make:

$ make

Note that a tab character must be used to offset the word "make". This file is 9 characters, including the 2 end-of-line characters and the 1 tab character.

I suppose you could do a similar thing with bash, but it's probably too easy to be interesting:

Create a filename "b" and mark it as executable (chmod +x b):

b ## ties the winning entry with only one character (does not require end-of-line)

Now execute the file with

$ ( PATH=$PATH:. ; b )

It's hard to say whether this approach technically results in stack overflow, but it does build a stack which will grow until the machine runs out of resources. The cool thing about doing it with GNU make is that you can watch it output status information as it builds and destroys the stack (assuming you hit ^C at some point before the crash occurs).

share

Another one in JavaScript:

(function() { arguments.callee() })()
share

PHP is a recursive acronym

share

.

share
1  
What language is that? GolfScript? :-) –  Chris Jester-Young Jul 22 '10 at 22:47

C++:

int overflow(int n)
{
    return overflow(1);
}
share
3  
A good compiler can tail-call optimise that one! :-P –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 15 '08 at 11:21
int main(){
    int a = 20;
    return main();
}
share
2  
This is invalid code, according to C++98 3.6.1.3 "The function main shall not be used within a program". </language_nazi> –  Motti Sep 15 '08 at 13:58

C#, done in 20 characters (exclusing whitespace):

int s(){
    return s();
}
share

JavaScript:

function i(){ i(); }
i();


C++ Using a function-pointer:

int main(){
   int (*f)() = &main;
   f();
}
share

Clarion:

Poke(0)
share

I tried to do it in Erlang:

c(N)->c(N+1)+c(N-1).
c(0).

The double invocation of itself makes the memory usage go up O(n^2) rather than O(n).

However the Erlang interpreter doesn't appear to manage to crash.

share

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.