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Using underscore.js is there a way to breakout of the each if a certain condition is met?

_.each([1,2,3], function(value) {
  if (value == 2) {
    // continue 2
    return false;
  }
});

I'm sure returning false did the trick in prototype.js

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You could always throw an exception, but that seems pretty clumsy. –  Pointy Jun 2 '11 at 18:50
1  
This issue addresses the problem that you cannot do this. Underscore has a breaker property you can return internally to break _.each. it's not public –  Raynos Jun 2 '11 at 18:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Looks like you should return breaker, which isn't in scope it seems. So, without modifying _, you can't easily break out of iteration. The === there will ensure that returning {} won't cause the loop to break; you need a reference to breaker, which you don't have.

 // The cornerstone, an `each` implementation, aka `forEach`.
  // Handles objects implementing `forEach`, arrays, and raw objects.
  // Delegates to **ECMAScript 5**'s native `forEach` if available.
  var each = _.each = _.forEach = function(obj, iterator, context) {
    if (obj == null) return;
    if (nativeForEach && obj.forEach === nativeForEach) {
      obj.forEach(iterator, context);
    } else if (_.isNumber(obj.length)) {
      for (var i = 0, l = obj.length; i < l; i++) {
        if (i in obj && iterator.call(context, obj[i], i, obj) === breaker) return;
      }
    } else {
      for (var key in obj) {
        if (hasOwnProperty.call(obj, key)) {
          if (iterator.call(context, obj[key], key, obj) === breaker) return;
        }
      }
    }
  };
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1  
You might want to report this as a bug or feature request. Also note that if your object supports forEach, then you can't break also. –  Stefan Kendall Jun 2 '11 at 18:56
    
Bug report –  Raynos Jun 2 '11 at 18:57
    
Here is how prototype.js handles it: prototypejs.org/api/enumerable/each –  serby Jun 2 '11 at 19:38
    
So is it possible to break out of the native forEach? –  serby Jun 2 '11 at 19:40

I'm not sure if you can actually stop the loop but you could use a boolean to stop the code in the loop from executing:

var keep_going = true;
_.each([1,2,3], function(value) {
  if(keep_going){
    if (value == 2) {
      // continue 2
      keep_going = false;
    }
  }
});
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You can't. As Stefan posted above, if your browser does not support Array.prototype.forEach (which is a long shot these days), you could return breaker -- if you had access to it. But unfortunately, you don't, because breaker is defined as {} in a closure in the underscore.js library.

Unfortunately, the behavior of JavaScript is that two objects are not equal to one another unless they are the exact same object. Therefore, ({}) === ({}) is false -- and so returning {} from your function will not pass an equality check with the internal breaker variable.

So, you can't break out of loops like this without roundabout methods like posted above. And, according to the MDC, there is no way to break the native forEach that is used.

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It may very well be that .each does not support skipping.

You can do it the roundabout way:

var skip = false;
_.each([1,2,3], function(value) {
  if (true === skip) {
    return;
  }
  if (value == 2) {
    skip = true;
    return false;
  }
});

But I'm sure there is a better function for it.

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In JavaScript, Yoda conditions not necessary are. ;) –  Tomalak Jun 2 '11 at 19:02
1  
Yoda conditions I write because my sanity I want to keep. Also triple equals I use because coercion I do not like. And why are Yoda conditions not necessary in JavaScript? You can still incorrectly write if (skip = true) –  Halcyon Jun 2 '11 at 19:25
    
Okay, maybe it's a matter of taste. I just don't like them, but I do see your point. –  Tomalak Jun 2 '11 at 19:49
    
Why not be consistent then and write if (2 == value)? :p –  Amadan Jun 5 '11 at 4:44
    
I just copy/pasted his code .. I also didn't add the === –  Halcyon Jun 5 '11 at 12:46

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