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I'm calling a REST API and receiving an XML response back. It returns a list of a workspace names and I'm writing a quick IsExistingWorkspace() method. Since all workspaces consist of contiguous characters with no whitespace, I'm assuming the easiest way to find out if a particular workspace is in the list is to remove all whitespace (including newlines) and doing this (XML is the string received from the web request):

XML.Contains("<name>" + workspaceName + "</name>");

I know it's case-sensitive and I'm relying on that. I just need a way to remove all whitespace in a string efficiently. I know RegEx and LINQ can do it, but I'm open to other ideas. Mostly just concerned about speed.

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3  
Parsing XML with regex is almost as bad as parsing HTML with regex. –  dtb Jun 2 '11 at 19:47
2  
@henk holterman; See my answer below, regexp doesn't seem to be the fastest in all cases. –  Henk J Meulekamp Jan 29 '13 at 20:05

14 Answers 14

up vote 151 down vote accepted
Regex.Replace(XML, @"\s+", "")

Fastest way I know of, even though you said you didn't want to use Regular Expressions.

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I could use a regular expression, I'm just not sure if it's the fastest way. –  Corey Ogburn Jun 2 '11 at 19:39
1  
I'm pretty sure it is. At the very least behind the scenes you have to check every character, and this is just doing a linear search. –  slandau Jun 2 '11 at 19:39
    
Yes regex is the way to go. –  Mehmetali Shaqiri Jun 2 '11 at 19:40
2  
Shouldn't that be Regex.Replace(XML, @"\s+", "")? –  Jan-Peter Vos Jun 2 '11 at 19:46
5  
If you plan to do this more than once, create and store a Regex instance. This will save the overhead of constructing it every time, which is more expensive than you might think. private static readonly Regex sWhitespace = new Regex(@"\s+"); public static string ReplaceWhitespace(string input, string replacement) { return sWhitespace.Replace(input, replacement); } –  hypehuman Jan 13 at 15:22

I have an alternative way without regexp and seem to perform pretty good. It is a continuation on Brandon Moretz answer:

 public static string RemoveWhitespace(this string input)
 {
    return new string(input.ToCharArray()
        .Where(c => !Char.IsWhiteSpace(c))
        .ToArray());
 }

I tested it in a simple unit test:

[Test]
[TestCase("123 123 1adc \n 222", "1231231adc222")]
public void RemoveWhiteSpace1(string input, string expected)
{
    string s = null;
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
    {
        s = input.RemoveWhitespace();
    }
    Assert.AreEqual(expected, s);
}

[Test]
[TestCase("123 123 1adc \n 222", "1231231adc222")]
public void RemoveWhiteSpace2(string input, string expected)
{
    string s = null;
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
    {
        s = Regex.Replace(input, @"\s+", "");
    }
    Assert.AreEqual(expected, s);
}

For 1000000 attempts the first option (without regexp) runs in less then a second ( 700ms on my machine) and the second takes 3.5 seconds.

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12  
.ToCharArray() is not necessary; you can use .Where() directly on a string. –  ProgramFOX Jan 1 '14 at 11:26
    
Just to note here. Regex is slower... on small strings! If you say you had a digitized version of a Volume on US Tax Law (~million words?), with a handful of iterations, Regex is king, by far! Its not what is faster, but what should be used in which circumstance. You only proved half the equation here. -1 until you prove the second half of the test so that the answer provides more insight to when what should be used. –  ppumkin Mar 6 at 16:28
2  
@ppumkin He asked for a single pass removal of whitespace. Not multiple iterations of other processing. I'm not going to make this single pass whitespace removal into an extended post about benchmarking text processing. –  Henk J Meulekamp Mar 9 at 15:39
    
You said its preferred not to use to regex this time but didn't say why. –  ppumkin Mar 9 at 16:26

Try the replace method of the string in C#.

xyz.Replace("  ", string.empty);
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9  
Doesn't remove tabs or newlines. If I do multiple removes now I'm making multiple passes over the string. –  Corey Ogburn Jun 2 '11 at 19:45
4  
Downvote for not removing all whitespace, as slandau and Henk's answers do. –  Matt Sach Oct 22 '13 at 15:26

Just an alternative because it looks quite nice :) - NOTE: Henks answer is the quickest of these.

input.ToCharArray()
 .Where(c => !Char.IsWhiteSpace(c))
 .Select(c => c.ToString())
 .Aggregate((a, b) => a + b);

Testing 1,000,000 loops on "This is a simple Test"

This method = 1.74 seconds
Regex = 2.58 seconds
new String (Henks) = 0.82

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1  
Why was this downvoted? It's perfectly acceptable, meets the requirements, works faster than the RegEx option and is very readable? –  BlueChippy Mar 10 at 10:11
    
because it can be written a lot shorter: new string(input.Where(c => !Char.IsWhiteSpace(c)).ToArray()); –  Bas Smit Mar 17 at 14:06
1  
Might be true - but the answer still stands, is readable, faster than regex and produces the desired result. Many of the other answers are AFTER this one...therefore a downvote does not make sense. –  BlueChippy Mar 18 at 12:12

If you need superb performance, you should avoid Linq and RegEx in this case. I did some performance benchmarking and seems that if you want to strip white space from beginning and end of the string, string.Trim() is your ultimate function.

If you need to strip all white spaces from a string, the following method works fastest of all that has been posted here:

    public static string RemoveWhitespace(this string input)
    {
        int j = 0, inputlen = input.Length;
        char[] newarr = new char[inputlen];

        for (int i = 0; i < inputlen; ++i)
        {
            char tmp = input[i];

            if (!char.IsWhiteSpace(tmp))
            {
                newarr[j] = tmp;
                ++j;
            }
        }

        return new String(newarr, 0, j);
    }
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I'd be curious to know the details of your benchmarkings--not that I am skeptical, but I'm curious about the overhead involved with Linq. How bad was it? –  Mark Meuer Dec 17 '14 at 22:39
    
I haven't re-run all the tests, but I can remember this much: Everything that involved Linq was a lot slower than anything without it. All the clever usage of string/char functions and constructors made no percentual difference if Linq was used. –  JHM Jan 16 at 10:57

My solution is to use Split and Join and it is surprisingly fast, in fact the fastest of the top answers here.

str = string.Join("", str.Split(default(string[]), StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries));

Timings for 10,000 loop on simple string with whitespace inc new lines and tabs

  • split/join = 60 milliseconds
  • linq chararray = 94 milliseconds
  • regex = 437 milliseconds
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I really like this solution, I've been using a similar one since pre-LINQ days. I'm actually impressed with LINQs performance, and somewhat surprised with regex. Maybe the code was not as optimal as it could have been for regex (you'll have to cache the regex object for example). But the crux of the problem is that the "quality" of the data will matter a lot. Maybe with long strings the regex will outperform the other options. It will be a fun benchmark to perform... :-) –  Loudenvier Jul 29 at 14:08
    
How does default(string[]) == a list of all whitespace characters? I see it working, but I am not understanding how? –  Jake Drew Aug 27 at 22:49
    
Split needs a valid array and null will not do so default(type) where in this case is a string[] returns the correct default for the function. –  kernowcode Aug 28 at 8:19

I assume your XML response looks like this:

var xml = @"<names>
                <name>
                    foo
                </name>
                <name>
                    bar
                </name>
            </names>";

The best way to process XML is to use an XML parser, such as LINQ to XML:

var doc = XDocument.Parse(xml);

var containsFoo = doc.Root
                     .Elements("name")
                     .Any(e => ((string)e).Trim() == "foo");
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Once I verify that a particular <name> tag has the proper value, I'm done. Wouldn't parsing the document have some overhead? –  Corey Ogburn Jun 2 '11 at 19:42
3  
Sure, it has some overhead. But it has the benefit of being correct. A solution based e.g. on regex is much more difficult to get right. If you determine that a LINQ to XML solution is too slow, you can always replace it with something faster. But you should avoid hunting for the most efficient implementation before you know that the correct one is too slow. –  dtb Jun 2 '11 at 19:45
    
This is going to be running in my employer's backend servers. Lightweight is what I'm looking for. I don't want something that "just works" but is optimal. –  Corey Ogburn Jun 2 '11 at 19:47
3  
LINQ to XML is one of the most lightweight ways to correctly work with XML in .NET –  dtb Jun 2 '11 at 19:49

Here is a simple linear alternative to the RegEx solution. Not sure which is faster, you'd have to benchmark it.

static string RemoveWhitespace(string input)
{
    StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder(input.Length);

    for (int index = 0; index < input.Length; index++)
    {
        if (!Char.IsWhiteSpace(input, index))
        {
            output.Append(input[index]);
        }
    }

    return output.ToString();
}
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Regex is overkill, just use extension on string(thanks Henk). This is trivial and should have been part of the framework. Anyhow, here's my implementation:

public static partial class Extension
{       
    public static string RemoveWhiteSpace(this string self)
    {
        return new string(self.Where(c => !Char.IsWhiteSpace(c)).ToArray());
    }
}
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this is basically an unnecessary answer (regex is overkill, but is a quicker solution than given one - and it is already accepted?) –  W1ll1amvl Oct 18 '14 at 0:41

I needed to replace white space in a string with spaces, but not duplicate spaces. e.g., I needed to convert something like the following:

"a b   c\r\n d\t\t\t e"

to

"a b c d e"

I used the following method

private static string RemoveWhiteSpace(string value)
{
    if (value == null) { return null; }
    var sb = new StringBuilder();

    var lastCharWs = false;
    foreach (var c in value)
    {
        if (char.IsWhiteSpace(c))
        {
            if (lastCharWs) { continue; }
            sb.Append(' ');
            lastCharWs = true;
        }
        else
        {
            sb.Append(c);
            lastCharWs = false;
        }
    }
    return sb.ToString();
}
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We can use System.Linq and we can do it in one line:

string text = "My text with white spaces...";
text = new string(text.ToList().Where(c => c != ' ').ToArray());
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2  
This doesn't seem as optimal as the accepted answer –  emartel Nov 21 '12 at 15:42
2  
That only removes spaces. Whitespace != spaces. –  ProfK Jan 23 '13 at 9:55

I have found different results to be true. I am trying to replace all whitespace with a single space and the regex was extremely slow.

return( Regex::Replace( text, L"\s+", L" " ) );

What worked the most optimally for me (in C++ cli) was:

String^ ReduceWhitespace( String^ text )
{
  String^ newText;
  bool    inWhitespace = false;
  Int32   posStart = 0;
  Int32   pos      = 0;
  for( pos = 0; pos < text->Length; ++pos )
  {
    wchar_t cc = text[pos];
    if( Char::IsWhiteSpace( cc ) )
    {
      if( !inWhitespace )
      {
        if( pos > posStart ) newText += text->Substring( posStart, pos - posStart );
        inWhitespace = true;
        newText += L' ';
      }
      posStart = pos + 1;
    }
    else
    {
      if( inWhitespace )
      {
        inWhitespace = false;
        posStart = pos;
      }
    }
  }

  if( pos > posStart ) newText += text->Substring( posStart, pos - posStart );

  return( newText );
}

I tried the above routine first by replacing each character separately, but had to switch to doing substrings for the non-space sections. When applying to a 1,200,000 character string:

  • the above routine gets it done in 25 seconds
  • the above routine + separate character replacement in 95 seconds
  • the regex aborted after 15 minutes.
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Say we have this string: string MyString = " test test test". You can split your string with one space delimiter: MyString.Split(' '). It results in array of empty strings and other charters. In this case it generates this array: { "", "test", "test", "", "", "", "test" }. Then using string.concat method you can Concatenate all strings in array which results in "testtesttest".

string MyString = " test test    test";
MyString = string.Concat(MyString.Split(' '));
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please add some description about your solution. code only answer are discouraged. –  ughai Apr 28 at 12:01

Here is yet another variant:

public static string RemoveAllWhitespace(string aString)
{
  return String.Join(String.Empty, aString.Where(aChar => aChar !Char.IsWhiteSpace(aChar)));
}

As with most of the other solutions, I haven't performed exhaustive benchmark tests, but this works well enough for my purposes.

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