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This is my code. When I access dtr array in initImg function it gives a stack overflow exception. What might be the reason?

#define W 1000
#define H 1000
#define MAX 100000 
void initImg(int img[], float dtr[])
{
    for(int i=0;i<W;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<H;j++)
            img[i*W+j]=255;

    for(int j=0;j<H;j++)
    {
        img[j] = 0;
        img[W*(W-1)+j] = 0;
    }
    for(int i=0;i<W;i++)
    {
        img[i*W] = 0;
        img[i*W+H-1] = 0;
    }
    for(int i=0;i<W;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<H;j++)
        { 
            if(img[i*W+j]==0)
                dtr[i*W+j] = 0;    // <------here
            else
                dtr[i*W+j] = MAX;  // <------here
        }
}
int main()
{
    int image[W*H];
    float dtr[W*H];
    initImg(image,dtr);
    return 0;
}
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7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This:

int image[W*H];
float dtr[W*H];

Creates each a 4 * 1000 * 1000 ~ 4 MB array into the stack. The stack space is limited, and usually it's less than 4 MB. Don't do that, create the arrays in the heap using new.

int *image = new int[W*H];
float *dtr = new float[W*H];
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9  
Uh- use a std::vector? –  Puppy Jun 2 '11 at 20:21
    
@DeadMG: Why use a dynamic structure for static data? If all he does is iterate over a known sized array - use a known sized array since it exactly fits the problem. –  Simon Jun 2 '11 at 20:38
1  
@Simon: You're creating a dynamically sized array anyway, it just happens to be of known size. Using new directly will allow memory leaks and has poor/no debugging support for out-of-bounds accesses, amongst other things. std::vector<int> image(W * H); performs the same function in a vastly safer way. –  Puppy Jun 2 '11 at 20:39
    
Works. Thank you verymuch –  user570593 Jun 2 '11 at 20:46
    
@DeadMG: How is it a dynamically sized array if it doesn't grow or shrink? If a case like this causes out-of-bounds accesses or memory leaks, you definitely shouldn't be using std::vector because then you don't know what you're doing. Learn the basics before you use other's solutions. –  Simon Jun 2 '11 at 20:54

Your stack probably isn't big enough to hold a million ints and a million floats (8MB). So as soon as you try to access beyond your stack size, your operating system throws you an error. Objects or arrays above a certain size need to be allocated on the heap - preferably using a self-managing self-bounds-checking class such as std::vector - the specific size depends on your implementation.

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In addition to the stack overrun, you have another problem -- one which is masked by your definitions of W and H.

for(int i=0;i<W;i++)
    for(int j=0;j<H;j++)
    { 
        if(img[i*W+j]==0)
            dtr[i*W+j] = 0;    // <------here
        else
            dtr[i*W+j] = MAX;  // <------here
    }

Your i loop should count from 0 to H-1, rather than W-1 (and the j loop should swap as well). Otherwise your code will only work correctly if W==H. If WH you will overrun your buffers.

This same problem exists elsewhere in your code sample as well.

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You're creating giant arrays on the stack. Just use std::vector instead:

std::vector<int> image(W*H);
std::vector<float> dtr(W*H);
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You will eventually get to

dtr[W*W+j] = 0;   <------here

Which is much more than you have allocated.

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-1 Incorrect, his loop is i < W, therefore, i can never be W to get W*W –  Dan F Jun 2 '11 at 20:31
    
@Dan F - you're correct however Bo's comment still reveals a bug in the poster's code -- one which is masked by W == H. If instead W = 100 and H = 10, the total array is 1000 elements but (i*W+j) = 9909 when i==W-1 and j==H-1. This problem arrises any time W>H, and its because the loops are backwards (or leaving the loops as they are, the index calculation needs to change). –  mah Jun 2 '11 at 20:45

Your compiler will define the stack size. A way to get around this is to dynamically allocate your arrays using std::vector array_one(W*H).

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You are trying to allocate memory from stack. the maximum memory which can be allocated using stack is complier dependent. So try something like this to avoid this kind of exception.

#include <stdlib.h>
#define W 1000
#define H 1000 
#define MAX 100000 
void initImg(int img[], float dtr[]) 
{ 
for(int i=0;i<W;i++) 
for(int j=0;j<H;j++) 
img[i*W+j]=255; 

for(int j=0;j<H;j++) 
{ 
img[j] = 0; 
img[W*(W-1)+j] = 0; 
} 
for(int i=0;i<W;i++) 
{ 
img[i*W] = 0; 
img[i*W+H-1] = 0; 
} 
for(int i=0;i<W;i++) 
for(int j=0;j<H;j++) 
{ 
if(img[i*W+j]==0) 
dtr[i*W+j] = 0; // <------here 
else 
dtr[i*W+j] = MAX; // <------here 
} 
} 
int main() 
{ 
int *image = (int*)malloc(4*W*H);   //Malloc the memory....(Allocated from Heap..)
float *dtr = (float*)malloc(4*W*H);

if(image && dtr) //If none of the ptr is NULL. Means memory is allocated...
{
initImg(image,dtr); 
}
return 0; 
}

You can use new as well instead of using malloc to allocate memory from heap...

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-1 The question is more than one year old, with an accepted answer and you add nothing besides what was already in other answers. Finally you did't correct the index issue raised here in the code you posted. –  Massimiliano Oct 3 '12 at 9:27
    
I go with @Massimiliano. You needn't answer an already accepted question unless you have something new to suggest. –  Rohit Oct 4 '12 at 9:13

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