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I want to print the first 10000 prime numbers. Can anyone give me the most efficient code for this? Clarifications:

  1. It does not matter if your code is inefficient for n >10000.
  2. The size of the code does not matter.
  3. You cannot just hard code the values in any manner.
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1  
Keep in mind that finding the first 10000 primes is a relatively small task. You could be looking at a difference of a few seconds between a fast and a slow algorithm. –  stalepretzel Oct 17 '08 at 15:43
4  
A little off topic but... this thread has 6 tags? I thought there was a limit of 5? –  Neil N Apr 7 '09 at 19:56
4  
oddly enough, this reminds me of Project Euler's problem 7 : projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=7 –  Brann Aug 8 '09 at 10:39
    
@stalepretzel This measuring limitation could be overcome by executing the algorithm 1,000 times in a row, for example. –  Daniel Daranas Aug 7 '12 at 9:48
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21 Answers 21

up vote 31 down vote accepted

The Sieve of Atkin is probably what you're looking for, its upper bound running time is O(N/log log N).

If you only run the numbers 1 more and 1 less than the multiples of 6, it could be even faster, as all prime numbers above 3 are 1 away from some multiple of six. Resource for my statement

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2  
Sieve of Eratosthenes could be faster for small N. See my answer. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 6 '08 at 20:06
22  
Either way, "The Sieve of Atkin" and "Sieve of Eratosthenes" are pretty badass sounding names. –  Simucal Feb 16 '09 at 5:34
4  
Though this is a good answer both Sieves only generate primes in the range [2, N], rather than the first N primes. –  Daniel Aug 10 '09 at 1:12
1  
Daniel: the 10,000th prime is less than 105,000 so he just has to hardcode his sieve to go up to 105,000. –  Gabe Feb 22 '10 at 8:01
    
@Daniel - see also the Prime Number Theorem - specifically, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… which gives theoretical lower and upper bounds for the Nth prime number. –  Stephen C Mar 2 at 1:57
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I recommend a sieve, either the Sieve of Eratosthenes or the Sieve of Atkin.

The sieve or Eratosthenes is probably the most intuitive method of finding a list of primes. Basically you:

  1. Write down a list of numbers from 2 to whatever limit you want, let's say 1000.
  2. Take the first number that isn't crossed off (for the first iteration this is 2) and cross off all multiples of that number from the list.
  3. Repeat step 2 until you reach the end of the list. All the numbers that aren't crossed off are prime.

Obviously there are quite a few optimizations that can be done to make this algorithm work faster, but this is the basic idea.

The sieve of Atkin uses a similar approach, but unfortunately I don't know enough about it to explain it to you. But I do know that the algorithm I linked takes 8 seconds to figure out all the primes up to 1000000000 on an ancient Pentium II-350

Sieve of Eratosthenes Source Code: http://primes.utm.edu/links/programs/sieves/Eratosthenes/C_source_code/

Sieve of Atkin Source Code: http://cr.yp.to/primegen.html

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primegen is worth a look. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 6 '08 at 19:20
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This isn't strictly against the hardcoding restriction, but comes terribly close. Why not programatically download this list and print it out, instead?

http://primes.utm.edu/lists/small/10000.txt

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9  
For most computers, calculating the values would be quicker than the latency involved in downloading them over the internet. –  Corey Oct 17 '08 at 15:50
2  
But not from having the list ready in memory. That's probably what he meant. –  Sebastian Krog Jun 18 '09 at 18:50
29  
"Sieve of Google" –  Kevin L. Aug 5 '09 at 4:33
5  
lol @krog. why would you bother to set up a network connection and all that jazz to DL a static file each time? of course you'd predownload it, heck, even hardcode it into an array. –  Mark Sep 7 '09 at 18:57
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GateKiller, how about adding a break to that if in the foreach loop? That would speed up things a lot because if like 6 is divisible by 2 you don't need to check with 3 and 5. (I'd vote your solution up anyway if I had enough reputation :-) ...)

ArrayList primeNumbers = new ArrayList();

for(int i = 2; primeNumbers.Count < 10000; i++) {
    bool divisible = false;

    foreach(int number in primeNumbers) {
        if(i % number == 0) {
            divisible = true;
            break;
        }
    }

    if(divisible == false) {
        primeNumbers.Add(i);
        Console.Write(i + " ");
    }
}
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You can still speed this up considerably by also breaking if number > sqrt(i). –  Beska Feb 21 '10 at 23:24
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@Matt: log(log(10000)) is ~2

From the wikipedia article (which you cited) Sieve of Atkin:

This sieve computes primes up to N using O(N/log log N) operations with only N1/2+o(1) bits of memory. That is a little better than the sieve of Eratosthenes which uses O(N) operations and O(N1/2(log log N)/log N) bits of memory (A.O.L. Atkin, D.J. Bernstein, 2004). These asymptotic computational complexities include simple optimizations, such as wheel factorization, and splitting the computation to smaller blocks.

Given asymptotic computational complexities along O(N) (for Eratosthenes) and O(N/log(log(N))) (for Atkin) we can't say (for small N=10_000) which algorithm if implemented will be faster.

Achim Flammenkamp wrote in The Sieve of Eratosthenes:

cited by:

@num1

For intervals larger about 10^9, surely for those > 10^10, the Sieve of Eratosthenes is outperformed by the Sieve of Atkins and Bernstein which uses irreducible binary quadratic forms. See their paper for background informations as well as paragraph 5 of W. Galway's Ph.D. thesis.

Therefore for 10_000 Sieve of Eratosthenes can be faster then Sieve of Atkin.

To answer OP the code is prime_sieve.c (cited by num1)

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I have adapted code found on the CodeProject to create the following:

ArrayList primeNumbers = new ArrayList();

for(int i = 2; primeNumbers.Count < 10000; i++) {
    bool divisible = false;

    foreach(int number in primeNumbers) {
        if(i % number == 0) {
            divisible = true;
        }
    }

    if(divisible == false) {
        primeNumbers.Add(i);
        Console.Write(i + " ");
    }
}

Testing this on my ASP.NET Server took the rountine about 1 minute to run.

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1  
You can speed that up if you exit that foreach loop when you get to number>squareroot(i). –  Clayton Oct 17 '08 at 13:28
1  
1min for 10000 is pretty slow. In C# (not utilizing parallel fors/foreaches), on average I get 13seconds up to 10,000,000. Using one parallel for I get on average 10seconds for the same bound. –  jlafay Sep 10 '10 at 14:18
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Using GMP, one could write the following:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <gmp.h>

int main() {
  mpz_t prime;
  mpz_init(prime);
  mpz_set_ui(prime, 1);
  int i;
  char* num = malloc(4000);
  for(i=0; i<10000; i++) {
    mpz_nextprime(prime, prime);
    printf("%s, ", mpz_get_str(NULL,10,prime));
  }
}

On my 2.33GHz Macbook Pro, it executes as follows:

time ./a.out > /dev/null

real    0m0.033s
user    0m0.029s
sys    0m0.003s

Calculating 1,000,000 primes on the same laptop:

time ./a.out > /dev/null

real    0m14.824s
user    0m14.606s
sys     0m0.086s

GMP is highly optimized for this sort of thing. Unless you really want to understand the algorithms by writing your own, you'd be advised to use libGMP under C.

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Sieve of Eratosthenes is the way to go, because of it's simplicity and speed. My implementation in C

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <math.h>

int main(void)
{
    unsigned int lim, i, j;

    printf("Find primes upto: ");
    scanf("%d", &lim);
    lim += 1;
    bool *primes = calloc(lim, sizeof(bool));

    unsigned int sqrtlim = sqrt(lim);
    for (i = 2; i <= sqrtlim; i++)
        if (!primes[i])
            for (j = i * i; j < lim; j += i)
                primes[j] = true;

    printf("\nListing prime numbers between 2 and %d:\n\n", lim - 1);
    for (i = 2; i < lim; i++)
        if (!primes[i])
            printf("%d\n", i);

    return 0;
}

CPU Time to find primes (on Pentium Dual Core E2140 1.6 GHz, using single core)

~ 4s for lim = 100,000,000

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what is the time for lim=1_000_000 ? It can't be both `<1s' and '5s'. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 6 '08 at 18:56
    
Name primes is misleading, in your code its meaning is_composite_number. You may eliminate the first loop if you replace malloc by calloc. Expression j+=i can overflow for large lim (and you'll miss some primes in that case). –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 6 '08 at 19:02
    
Fixed. < 1s for 100,000, ~5s for 1,000,000 Thanks for suggesting calloc and the alternative array name. I also thought primes[] is quite confusing, but couldn't think of a better name. –  Imran Oct 17 '08 at 12:56
    
Replacing the loop with calloc now gets lim = 100,000,000 done in ~4s –  Imran Oct 17 '08 at 15:41
1  
this does not answer the question: he asked for the first N primes, not all the primes up to N... –  Jonathan Feb 26 at 16:34
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In Haskell, we can write down almost word for word the mathematical definition of the sieve of Eratosthenes, "primes are natural numbers above 1 without any composite numbers, where composites are found by enumeration of each prime's multiples":

primes = 2 : minus [3..] (foldr (\p r-> p*p : union [p*p+p, p*p+2*p..] r) 
                                [] primes)

primes !! 10000 is near-instantaneous.

References:


The code is easily tweaked into working on odds only, primes = 2:3:minus [5,7..] (foldr (\p r -> p*p : union [p*p+2*p, p*p+4*p..] r) [] (tail primes)). Time complexity is much improved (to just about a log factor above optimal) by folding in a tree-like structure, and space complexity is drastically improved by multistage primes production, in

primes = 2 : _Y ( (3:) . sieve 5 . unionAll . map (\p-> [p*p, p*p+2*p..]) )
  where
    _Y g = g (_Y g)                        -- non-sharing fixpoint combinator
    unionAll ((x:xs):t) = x : (union xs . unionAll . pairs) t
    pairs    (xs:ys:t)  = union xs ys : pairs t
    sieve k s@(x:xs) | k < x      = k : sieve (k+2) s   -- == minus [k,k+2..] s,
                     | otherwise  =     sieve (k+2) xs  --      when k <= x

(In Haskell parentheses are used for grouping, a function call is signified just by a juxtaposition, (:) is a cons operator for lists, and (.) is a functional composition operator: (f . g) x = (\y-> f (g y)) x = f (g x)).

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If you really just want the print out then a google search followed by a print is the fastest. :-)

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Good search keywords: prime number table. Search turned up for example this site: walter-fendt.de/m14e/primes.htm –  Juha Syrjälä Jan 14 '09 at 20:15
    
Calculating the prime numbers up to 10000 is much faster. –  Georg Schölly Apr 7 '09 at 19:54
2  
Not if you count writing the code. :-) –  Kevin Gale May 6 '09 at 17:38
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Here is a Sieve of Eratosthenes that I wrote in PowerShell a few days ago. It has a parameter for identifying the number of prime numbers that should be returned.

#
# generate a list of primes up to a specific target using a sieve of eratosthenes
#
function getPrimes { #sieve of eratosthenes, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes
    param ($target,$count = 0)
    $sieveBound = [math]::ceiling(( $target - 1 ) / 2) #not storing evens so count is lower than $target
    $sieve = @($false) * $sieveBound
    $crossLimit = [math]::ceiling(( [math]::sqrt($target) - 1 ) / 2)
    for ($i = 1; $i -le $crossLimit; $i ++) {
        if ($sieve[$i] -eq $false) {
            $prime = 2 * $i + 1
            write-debug "Found: $prime"
            for ($x = 2 * $i * ( $i + 1 ); $x -lt $sieveBound; $x += 2 * $i + 1) {
                $sieve[$x] = $true
            }
        }
    }
    $primes = @(2)
    for ($i = 1; $i -le $sieveBound; $i ++) {
        if($count -gt 0 -and $primes.length -ge $count) {
            break;
        }
        if($sieve[$i] -eq $false) {
            $prime = 2 * $i + 1
            write-debug "Output: $prime"
            $primes += $prime
        }
    }
    return $primes
}
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Not efficient at all, but you can use a regular expression to test for prime numbers.

/^1?$|^(11+?)\1+$/

This tests if, for a string consisting of k1”s, k is not prime (i.e. whether the string consists of one “1” or any number of “1”s that can be expressed as an n-ary product).

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Here is my VB 2008 code, which finds all primes <10,000,000 in 1 min 27 secs on my work laptop. It skips even numbers and only looks for primes that are < the sqrt of the test number. It is only designed to find primes from 0 to a sentinal value.

Private Sub Button1_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles 
Button1.Click

    Dim TestNum As Integer
    Dim X As Integer
    Dim Z As Integer
    Dim TM As Single
    Dim TS As Single
    Dim TMS As Single
    Dim UnPrime As Boolean
    Dim Sentinal As Integer
    Button1.Text = "Thinking"
    Button1.Refresh()
    Sentinal = Val(SentinalTxt.Text)
    UnPrime = True
    Primes(0) = 2
    Primes(1) = 3
    Z = 1
    TM = TimeOfDay.Minute
    TS = TimeOfDay.Second
    TMS = TimeOfDay.Millisecond
    For TestNum = 5 To Sentinal Step 2
        Do While Primes(X) <> 0 And UnPrime And Primes(X) ^ 2 <= TestNum
            If Int(TestNum / Primes(X)) - (TestNum / Primes(X)) = 0 Then
                UnPrime = False
            End If
            X = X + 1

        Loop
        If UnPrime = True Then
            X = X + 1
            Z = Z + 1
            Primes(Z) = TestNum
        End If
        UnPrime = True
        X = 0
    Next
    Button1.Text = "Finished with " & Z
    TM = TimeOfDay.Minute - TM
    TS = TimeOfDay.Second - TS
    TMS = TimeOfDay.Millisecond - TMS
    ShowTime.Text = TM & ":" & TS & ":" & TMS
End Sub
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@John with waffle proposed (above or below) that you just download the list from a well-known place, which @Kevin.L cleverly labelled the "Sieve of Google".

In the same spirit ( :-) ), I'd like to propose two variant algorithms:

  • "Sieve of Amazon" ... where you propose finding the Nth prime as an Amazon MechTurk job.

  • "Sieve of StackOverflow" ... where you ask for the Nth prime in a StackOverflow question.

Both algorithms are only probablistically correct, and the latter has a number of additional failure modes. For example:

  • where the OP is downvoted and the Question is closed as off-topic before an answer is provided

  • where the question is misread and (incorrectly!) closed it as a duplicate of this one

  • where irrelevant answers are posted; e.g. giving code for the SoE in visual basic.

:-)

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Adapting and following on from GateKiller, here's the final version that I've used.

    public IEnumerable<long> PrimeNumbers(long number)
    {
        List<long> primes = new List<long>();
        for (int i = 2; primes.Count < number; i++)
        {
            bool divisible = false;

            foreach (int num in primes)
            {
                if (i % num == 0)
                    divisible = true;

                if (num > Math.Sqrt(i))
                    break;
            }

            if (divisible == false)
                primes.Add(i);
        }
        return primes;
    }

It's basically the same, but I've added the "break on Sqrt" suggestion and changed some of the variables around to make it fit better for me. (I was working on Euler and needed the 10001th prime)

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Thanks @WillNess for letting me know. There are much better solutions than this one in the thread, so I won't update my answer at the moment (I can't really remember the problem, or what I was trying to solve 3 years ago), but thanks for letting me know :) –  Pat Mar 2 '12 at 10:48
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The Sieve seems to be the wrong answer. The sieve gives you the primes up to a number N, not the first N primes. Run @Imran or @Andrew Szeto, and you get the primes up to N.

The sieve might still be usable if you keep trying sieves for increasingly larger numbers until you hit a certain size of your result set, and use some caching of numbers already obtained, but I believe it would still be no faster than a solution like @Pat's.

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1  
The needed upper limit is easy to estimate, with some spare, as m = n(log n + log (log n)), for n>= 6 (see wikipedia). Plus, the sieve of Eratosthenes can be reformulated as segmented, making it truly incremental. –  Will Ness Apr 24 '12 at 8:46
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In Python

import gmpy
p=1
for i in range(10000):
    p=gmpy.next_prime(p)
    print p 
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using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int n, i = 3, j, c;
            Console.WriteLine("Please enter your integer: ");
            n = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            if (n >= 1)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("First " + n + " Prime Numbers are");
                Console.WriteLine("2");
            }
            for(j=2;j<=n;)
            {
                for(c=2;c<=i-1;c++)
                {
                    if(i%c==0)
                        break;
                }
                    if(c==i)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(i);
                        j++;
                    }
                    i++;                                
            }
            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}
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This solution doesn't work. –  Florent Oct 21 '12 at 8:42
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I spend some time writing a program calculating a lot of primes and this is the code I'm used to calculate a text file containing the first 1.000.000.000 primes. It's in German, but the interesting part is the method calcPrimes(). The primes are stored in an array called Primzahlen. I recommend a 64bit CPU because the calculations are with 64bit integers.

import java.io.*;
class Primzahlengenerator {
    long[] Primzahlen;
    int LastUnknown = 2;
    public static void main(String[] args)  {
        Primzahlengenerator Generator = new Primzahlengenerator();
        switch(args.length) {
            case 0:  //Wenn keine Argumente übergeben worden:
                Generator.printHelp(); //Hilfe ausgeben
                return; //Durchfallen verhindern
            case 1:
                try {
                    Generator.Primzahlen = new long[Integer.decode(args[0]).intValue()];
                }
                catch (NumberFormatException e) {
                    System.out.println("Das erste Argument muss eine Zahl sein, und nicht als Wort z.B. \"Tausend\", sondern in Ziffern z.B. \"1000\" ausgedrückt werden.");//Hinweis, wie man die Argumente angeben muss ausgeben
                    Generator.printHelp();                    //Generelle Hilfe ausgeben
                    return;
                }
                break;//dutchfallen verhindern

            case 2:
                switch (args[1]) {
                    case "-l":
                        System.out.println("Sie müsen auch eine Datei angeben!"); //Hilfemitteilung ausgeben
                        Generator.printHelp();                                    //Generelle Hilfe ausgeben
                        return;
                }
                break;//durchfallen verhindern
            case 3:
                try {
                    Generator.Primzahlen = new long[Integer.decode(args[0]).intValue()];
                }
                catch (NumberFormatException e) {
                    System.out.println("Das erste Argument muss eine Zahl sein, und nicht als Wort z.B. \"Tausend\", sondern in Ziffern z.B. \"1000\" ausgedrückt werden.");//Hinweis, wie man die Argumente angeben muss ausgeben
                    Generator.printHelp();                      //Generelle Hilfe ausgeben
                    return;
                }
                switch(args[1]) {
                    case "-l":
                        Generator.loadFromFile(args[2]);//Datei Namens des Inhalts von Argument 3 lesen, falls Argument 2 = "-l" ist
                        break;
                    default:
                        Generator.printHelp();
                        break;
                }
                break;
            default:
                Generator.printHelp();
                return;
        }
        Generator.calcPrims();
    }
    void printHelp() {
        System.out.println("Sie müssen als erstes Argument angeben, die wieviel ersten Primzahlen sie berechnen wollen.");   //Anleitung wie man das Programm mit Argumenten füttern muss
        System.out.println("Als zweites Argument können sie \"-l\" wählen, worauf die Datei, aus der die Primzahlen geladen werden sollen,");
        System.out.println("folgen muss. Sie muss genauso aufgebaut sein, wie eine Datei Primzahlen.txt, die durch den Aufruf \"java Primzahlengenerator 1000 > Primzahlen.txt\" entsteht.");
    }
    void loadFromFile(String File) {
        // System.out.println("Lese Datei namens: \"" + File + "\"");
        try{
            int x = 0;
            BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(File));
            String line;
            while((line = in.readLine()) != null) {
                Primzahlen[x] = new Long(line).longValue();
                x++;
            }
            LastUnknown = x;
        } catch(FileNotFoundException ex) {
            System.out.println("Die angegebene Datei existiert nicht. Bitte geben sie eine existierende Datei an.");
        } catch(IOException ex) {
            System.err.println(ex);
        } catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException ex) {
            System.out.println("Die Datei enthält mehr Primzahlen als der reservierte Speicherbereich aufnehmen kann. Bitte geben sie als erstes Argument eine größere Zahl an,");
            System.out.println("damit alle in der Datei enthaltenen Primzahlen aufgenommen werden können.");
            }
        /* for(long prim : Primzahlen) {
            System.out.println("" + prim);
        } */
        //Hier soll code stehen, der von der Datei mit angegebenem Namen ( Wie diese aussieht einfach durch angeben von folgendem in cmd rausfinden:
        //java Primzahlengenerator 1000 > 1000Primzahlen.txt
        //da kommt ne textdatei, die die primzahlen enthält. mit Long.decode(String ziffern).longValue();
        //erhält man das was an der entsprechenden stelle in das array soll. die erste zeile soll in [0] , die zweite zeile in [1] und so weiter.
        //falls im arry der platz aus geht(die exception kenn ich grad nich, aber mach mal:
        //int[] foo = { 1, 2, 3};
        //int bar = foo[4];
        //dann kriegst ne exception, das ist die gleiche die man kriegt, wenn im arry der platzt aus geht.
    }
    void calcPrims() {
        int PrimzahlNummer = LastUnknown;
        // System.out.println("LAstUnknown ist: " + LastUnknown);
        Primzahlen[0] = 2;
        Primzahlen[1] = 3;
        long AktuelleZahl = Primzahlen[PrimzahlNummer - 1];
        boolean IstPrimzahl;
        // System.out.println("2");
        // System.out.println("3");
        int Limit = Primzahlen.length;
        while(PrimzahlNummer < Limit) {
            IstPrimzahl = true;
            double WurzelDerAktuellenZahl = java.lang.Math.sqrt(AktuelleZahl);
            for(int i = 1;i < PrimzahlNummer;i++) {
                if(AktuelleZahl % Primzahlen[i] == 0) {
                    IstPrimzahl = false;
                    break;
                }
                if(Primzahlen[i] > WurzelDerAktuellenZahl) break;
            }
            if(IstPrimzahl) {
                Primzahlen[PrimzahlNummer] = AktuelleZahl;
                PrimzahlNummer++;
                // System.out.println("" + AktuelleZahl);
            }
            AktuelleZahl = AktuelleZahl + 2;
        }
        for(long prim : Primzahlen) {
            System.out.println("" + prim);
        }
    }
}
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I have written this using python, as I just started learning it, and it works perfectly fine. The 10,000th prime generate by this code as same as mentioned in http://primes.utm.edu/lists/small/10000.txt. To check if n is prime or not, divide n by the numbers from 2 to sqrt(n). If any of this range of number perfectly divides n then it's not prime.

import math
print ("You want prime till which number??")
a = input()
a = int(a)
x = 0
x = int(x)
count = 1
print("2 is prime number")
for c in range(3,a+1):
    b = math.sqrt(c)
    b = int(b)
    x = 0
    for b in range(2,b+1):
        e  = c % b
        e = int(e)
        if (e == 0):
            x = x+1
    if (x == 0):
        print("%d is prime number" % c)
        count = count + 1
print("Total number of prime till %d is %d" % (a,count))
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The following Mathcad code calculated the first million primes in under 3 minutes.

Bear in mind that this would be using floating point doubles for all of the numbers and is basically interpreted. I hope the syntax is clear.

enter image description here

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