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I have a function that I want it execute alternating processes every time it's triggered. Any help on how I would achieve this would be great.

function onoff(){
    statusOn process /*or if on*/ statusOff process
}
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It's fascinating to see how many different ways we can solve the same problem. Great question! –  bejonbee Jun 2 '11 at 22:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One interesting aspect of JavaScript is that functions are first-class objects, meaning they can have custom properties:

function onoff() {
    onoff.enabled = !onoff.enabled;
    if(onoff.enabled) {
        alert('on');
    } else {
        alert('off');
    }
}

For this to work, your function should have a name. If your function is anonymous (unnamed), you can try to use arguments.callee to access it, but that is deprecated in the new ES5 standard and not possible when using its strict mode.

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Great suggestion. I'd modify by switching with bitwise XOR by value: onoff.enabled ^= 1. –  ic3b3rg Jun 2 '11 at 21:22
    
@ic3b3rg, what's the advantage of your approach? –  squidbe Jun 2 '11 at 23:42
    
@squidbe It's shorter. –  ic3b3rg Jun 2 '11 at 23:45
    
I feel I should -1 this answer, but I can't bring myself to. While it's cute, I feel the anon-function issue is a major issue (though a deprecated workaround is given), and worry this will encourage bad coding practice. Something just seems very wrong with using function attributes for what closures exist for. I would only use function attributes for things like decorators (func.wrapped), function metadata (func.doc, func.name), caches (func.memoization_cache), etc. -- and not pollute that namespace by using it as a dumping ground for variables which belong in a closure. –  ninjagecko Jun 3 '11 at 7:02
    
@ninjagecko: I agree so much; I've done the -1 for you. There is absolutely no reason to pollute the namespace with the toggle variable, which is a concern that should not leak to (i.e. be modifiable by) calling code. –  Domenic Jun 6 '11 at 12:41

With the use of closures, you can define a static variable that is only accessible by the function itself:

var toggle = (function()
{
    var state = true;

    return function()
    {
        if(state)
            alert("A");
        else
            alert("B");

        state = !state;
    };
})();

Now you can repeatedly invoke toggle(), and it would alternate between "A" and "B". The state variable is unaccessible from the outside, so you don't pollute the global variable scope.

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Use closures. In addition to closures, this method demonstrates arbitrary arguments and arbitrary numbers of functions to cycle through:

Function cycler

function cycle() {
    var toCall = arguments;
    var which = 0;
    return function() {
        var R = toCall[which].apply(this, arguments);
        which = (which+1) % toCall.length;  // see NOTE
        return R;
    }
}

Demo:

function sum(a,b) {return a+b}
function prod(a,b) {return a*b}
function pow(a,b) {return Math.pow(a,b)}
function negate(x) {return -x;}

var f = cycle(sum, prod, pow, negate);
console.log(f(2,10)); // 12
console.log(f(2,10)); // 20
console.log(f(2,10)); // 1024
console.log(f(2));    // -2
// repeat!
console.log(f(2,10)); // 12
console.log(f(2,10)); // 20
console.log(f(2,10)); // 1024
console.log(f(2));    // -2

Arbitrary cycler

Alternatively if you do not wish to assume all cycled things are functions, you can use this pattern. In some ways it is more elegant; in some ways it is less elegant.

function cycle() {
    var list = arguments;
    var which = 0;
    return function() {
        var R = list[which];
        which = (which+1) % toCall.length;  // see NOTE
        return R;
    }
}

Demo:

var cycler = cycle(function(x){return x}, 4, function(a,b){return a+b});
cycler()(1);   // 1
cycler();      // 4
cycler()(1,5); // 6
// repeat!
cycler()(1);   // 1
cycler();      // 4
cycler()(1,5); // 6

NOTE: Because javascript thinks 10000000000000001%2 is 0 (i.e. that this number is even), this function must be three codelines longer than necessary, or else you will only be able to call this function 10 quadrillion times before it gives an incorrect answer. You are unlikely to reach this limit in a single browsing session... but who knows

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If I'm understanding what you want, this may be what you're looking for:

var AlternateFunctions = function() {
    var one = function() {
        // do stuff...

        current = two;
    }, two = function() {
        // do stuff...

        current = one;
    }, current = one;
    return function() {
        current();
    }
}();

Then calling AlternateFunctions(); will cycle between one() and two()

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Not sure the reasoning for the downvote, considering the answer is correct, even if not chosen. –  Robert Jun 2 '11 at 21:21
    
Sorry, the reason for the downvote was because 1) it uses a global variable current which makes it impossible to reuse this pattern (workaround: declare as a var inside function), 2) requires a redefining of the functions to implement control flow (basically creating a Class with methods; overkill) when the alternating control flow is intrinsic to the question, 3) it does not promote modular code because it is a code pattern rather than a function makeAlternatingFunctions(f1,f2). –  ninjagecko Jun 3 '11 at 7:12
    
current isn't global, you could simply execute the other defined functions in one and two, I don't see how it's any less modular than the other answers that you didn't downvote. –  Robert Jun 3 '11 at 14:01
    
Apologies, indeed current is a local via a comma. I think my biggest qualm is the way one would modularize would require, imho, some refactoring. Namely if I was writing in this style, I'd write function makeAlternator(a,b) { function aWrapper(){var R=a.apply(this,arguments); current=bWrapper; return R;} function bWrapper(){var R=b.apply(this,arguments); current=aWrapper; return R;} var current = aWrapper; return function(){return current.apply(this,arguments)};} which would be equivalent to the other two closure approaches, but more complicated and harder to generalize to 3+ cycles. –  ninjagecko Jun 3 '11 at 21:21
    
addendum: The power of this approach comes from the fact that you can arbitrarily modify which function comes next dynamically. For example, you could use this pattern to make a function where the next function was determined by the subfunction, e.g. whenever the function returns new Directive_SwitchToFunction(N) then it would switch to function N. Thus it is a powerful and useful approach to know, but also why I didn't think it went well with the problem because of the above. Hope that explains why I downvoted. –  ninjagecko Jun 3 '11 at 21:28

There are a couple of good answers already posted, but I'm wondering what you're trying to achieve. If you're keeping track of some DOM element's state, instead of having state saved within the function, you should check the state of the element so that the function isn't operating in a vacuum (and possibly not doing what you expect). You can check some attribute, e.g., class:

function onoff(obj){
    if(obj.className === 'on') {
        obj.className = 'off';
    }else{
        obj.className = 'on';
    }
}
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var last=0;
function toggle() {
   if(last) {
      last=0;
      // do process 2
   }
   else {
      last=1;
      // do process 1
   }
}
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