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Q: Is there a better way to handle SqlExceptions?

The below examples rely on interpreting the text in the message.

Eg1: I have an existing try catch to handle if a table does not exist.
Ignore the fact that I could check if the table exists in the first place.

try
{
    //code
}
catch(SqlException sqlEx)
{
        if (sqlEx.Message.StartsWith("Invalid object name"))
        {
            //code
        }
        else
            throw;
}

Eg2: without the try catch showing duplicate key exception

if (sqlEx.Message.StartsWith("Cannot insert duplicate key row in object"))

Solution: The start of my SqlExceptionHelper

//-- to see list of error messages: select * from sys.messages where language_id = 1033 order by message_id
public static class SqlExceptionHelper
{
    //-- rule: Add error messages in numeric order and prefix the number above the method

    //-- 208: Invalid object name '%.*ls'.
    public static bool IsInvalidObjectName(SqlException sex)
    { return (sex.Number == 208); }

    //-- 2601: Cannot insert duplicate key row in object '%.*ls' with unique index '%.*ls'. The duplicate key value is %ls.
    public static bool IsDuplicateKey(SqlException sex)
    { return (sex.Number == 2601); }
}
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7 Answers 7

up vote 45 down vote accepted

The SqlException has a Number property that you can check. For duplicate error the number is 2601.

catch (SqlException e)
{
   switch (e.Number)
   {
      case 2601:
         // Do something.
         break;
      default:
         throw;
   }
 }

To get a list of all SQL errors from you server, try this:

 SELECT * FROM sysmessages
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Sort of, kind of. See Cause and Resolution of Database Engine Errors

class SqllErrorNumbers
{ 
   public const int BadObject = 208;
   public const int DupKey = 2627;
}

try
{
   ...
}
catch(SqlException sex)
{
   foreach(SqlErrorCode err in sex.Errors)
   {
      switch (err.Number)
      {
      case SqlErrorNumber.BadObject:...
      case SqllErrorNumbers.DupKey: ...
      }
   }
}

The problem though is that a good DAL layer would us TRY/CATCH inside the T-SQL (stored procedures), with a pattern like Exception handling and nested transactions. Alas a T-SQL TRY/CATCH block cannot raise the original error code, will have to raise a new error, with code above 50000. This makes client side handling a problem. In the next version of SQL Server there is a new THROW construct that allow to re-raise the original exception from T-SQL catch blocks.

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1  
Thank you for the advice and links. btw: I like catching sex :) I will start using that instead of sqlEx for fun. Reminds me of the old classic asp days On Error Goto Hell –  Valamas - AUS Jun 3 '11 at 1:18

It is better to use error codes, you don't have to parse.

try
{
}
catch (SqlException exception)
{
    if (exception.Number == 208)
    {

    }
    else
        throw;
}

How to find out that 208 should be used:

select message_id
from sys.messages
where text like 'Invalid object name%'
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the advice. I will create a SqlException helper. Also, thank you very much for pointing me to the sql table of errors. select * from sys.messages where language_id = 1033 –  Valamas - AUS Jun 3 '11 at 1:14
    
select * from master.dbo.sysmessages where msglangid=1033 or SELECT * FROM sys.messages WHERE language_id = 1033 to filter only english messages. Besides, the message_id in system table is not a one-one map as SqlException.Number. I've verified on C# and SQL Server 2008 R2, for Timeout error, the SqlException.Number is -2, but there's no such an error definition in system tables. –  zhaorufei Apr 24 '13 at 3:35

If you are looking for a better way to handle SQLException, there are a couple things you could do. First, Spring.NET does something similar to what you are looking for (I think). Here is a link to what they are doing:

http://springframework.net/docs/1.2.0/reference/html/dao.html

Also, instead of looking at the message, you could check the error code (sqlEx.Number). That would seem to be a better way of identifying which error occurred. The only problem is that the error number returned might be different for each database provider. If you plan to switch providers, you will be back to handling it the way you are or creating an abstraction layer that translates this information for you.

Here is an example of a guy who used the error code and a config file to translate and localize user-friendly error messages:

http://weblogs.asp.net/guys/archive/2005/05/20/408142.aspx

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thank you for 2nd link –  Valamas - AUS Jun 3 '11 at 1:15

With MS SQL 2008, we can list supported error messages in the table sys.messages

SELECT * FROM sys.messages
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If you want list of error messages met in Sql server, you can see with

SELECT *
FROM master.dbo.sysmessages
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For those of you rookies out there who may throw a SQL error when connecting to the DB from another machine(For example, at form load), you will find that when you first setup a datatable in C# which points to a SQL server database that it will setup a connection like this:

this.Table_nameTableAdapter.Fill(this.DatabaseNameDataSet.Table_name);

You may need to remove this line and replace it with something else like a traditional connection string as mentioned on MSDN, etc.

http://www.connectionstrings.com/sql-server-2008

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