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The following code

System.out.println("1 0 0: " + (true ^ false ^ false));
System.out.println("1 0 1: " + (true ^ false ^ true));
System.out.println("1 1 0: " + (true ^ true ^ false));
System.out.println("1 1 1: " + (true ^ true ^ true));
System.out.println("0 0 0: " + (false ^ false ^ false));
System.out.println("0 0 1: " + (false ^ false ^ true));
System.out.println("0 1 0: " + (false ^ true ^ false));
System.out.println("0 1 1: " + (false ^ true ^ true));

outputs:

1 0 0: true
1 0 1: false
1 1 0: false
1 1 1: true
0 0 0: false
0 0 1: true
0 1 0: true
0 1 1: false

Why does XOR returns true when all three inputs are true?

If it's valid logic how can I implement logic that returns true only if one of the input elements is true (no matter how many inputs I provide)?

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true ^ true ^ true can be written (for understanding) as ( true ^ true ) ^ true which is true. –  Bala R Jun 3 '11 at 1:46
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
If you want a true result, if one and only one inputs is true you can use:

(a ^ b ^ c ) ^ ( a && b && c )

the test case result:

true true true = false
true true false = false
true false true = false
true false false = true
false true true = false
false true false = true
false false true = true
false false false = false
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Because true xor true = false, and false xor true is true. xor is associative, so group the values any way you please!

To decide that only one of them is true, you could add the values together as integers and see if the answer is 1.

I'm answering this as a general programming question, it really isn't particular to Java.

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I like the idea of adding values together, thank you! –  parxier Jun 3 '11 at 1:59
    
I just realised org.apache.commons.lang.BooleanUtils#xor(boolean[]) does exactly what I need. Thank for an idea anyway! –  parxier Jun 3 '11 at 2:03
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Think about how the compiler evaluates this:

(true ^ true) ^ true

After first term true ^ true, which is false, has been evaluated:

(false) ^ true ==> true
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'^' is a binary logical operator, not an n-ary operator.

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true ^ true ^ true can be written (for understanding) as ( true ^ true ) ^ true which is true.

If A, B, C are inputs, for the logic that you are looking for, you need something like this

(A & !B & !C) | (!A & B & !C) | (!A & !B & C)
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Ok. Is it the shortest expression.. really? :-) –  parxier Jun 3 '11 at 1:53
    
This is what I was able to think of. I'm not sure how to simplify that. –  Bala R Jun 3 '11 at 1:54
    
A?b?false:!c:b?!c:c maybe? Or a?!(b||c):b^c –  mvds Jun 3 '11 at 2:05
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