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What I am trying to do is split the 256 total numeric value of a byte into their counter parts.

What we know is that in binary:

0001 1111 is 31  
0011 1111 is 63  
0111 1111 is 127  
1111 1111 is 255

The goal is to make it so that if I have a 5 by 5 grid

0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0  

Which gives me 25 total slots. Each Slot can have a numeric value of 0-31. Therefore numeric value "4294967295" would be 31 in each slot, where "0" is 0 in each slot, so I am trying to figure out how in C# being able to shift the bit values.

so if I have in my grid:

1 3 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 5 0 0 
0 0 3 0 6  

First slot would be bit 1 to 4, 0x0 to 0x1F
Second slot would be bit 5, 0x20 to 0x3F
3rd Slot would be bit 6, 0x40 to 0x5F
4th slot would be bit 7, 0x60 to 0x7F
5th slot would be bit 8, 0x80 to 0x9F

and so forth

How would I do this in C#.

There would be 0-31 per slot, (256 / 8) = 8 total slots.

In theory I could have a maximum of 32 slots, in a 6x5 or 5x6 grid if I needed. But right now I just need 5x5.

-- Edited

                    byte[] values = new byte[]
        {
            25, 31, 31, 31, 31,
            31, 31, 31, 31, 31,
            31, 31, 31, 31, 31,
            31, 31, 31, 31, 31,
            31, 31, 31, 31, 31,
            31, 31
        };
        Console.Clear();

        uint number = 0;
        for ( int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++ )
        {
            number |= (uint)(values[i] << i);
            Console.WriteLine( number );
        }

        byte[] buffer = BitConverter.GetBytes( number );

        for ( int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++ )
        {
            values[i] = (byte)((number >> i) & 0x1F);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();

When I did this it gave me 255, in the buffer in each slot which is what I wanted... Apparently this is what I am aiming for. Even though I'd have 8 extra slots i can use but i'll just ignore them...

Now to break it up into their parts from a unsigned integer is the next goal.

Thanks for all the help so far in a quick fashion manner.

EDITED

I changed it back, apparently I can only have up to 28 parts

The problem I have now is the converting back into their parts. Right now its not shifting the way I want it to, it sets them all to be 31 when the first one should be 25 according to the array.

share|improve this question
3  
6*6 is 36 though? – Michael Stum Jun 3 '11 at 2:14
    
My bad yeah your right. my goal is to make it so that i can do a 5 by 5 grid to a maximum of 32 bits total. really I only need 25 total. – Benjamin Jun 3 '11 at 2:17
    
Although, when I comment out to just have the 5x5 concept, it remains at 255, 255, 255, 255 in the buffer. That should be incorrect – Benjamin Jun 3 '11 at 2:33
1  
+= is NOT what you want for bit manipulation. – Ben Voigt Jun 3 '11 at 2:45
    
Your right Ben, if I use |= then I can have 28, which is what it should be. – Benjamin Jun 3 '11 at 3:16

If each slot can have 0-31, then each slot needs 5 bits. You can fit 6 slots in a 32-bit integer, you'll then need one integer per row.

Have a look at the C# Operator Reference, the operators especially useful for bit manipulation are |, &, <<, >>.

First slot would be bit 1 to 4, 0x0 to 0x1F

Second slot would be bit 5, 0x20 to 0x3F

3rd Slot would be bit 6, 0x40 to 0x5F

4th slot would be bit 7, 0x60 to 0x7F

5th slot would be bit 8, 0x80 to 0x9F

That's not how bits work, you need a separate group of 5 bits per slot. Unless only one number in each row is non-zero, in which case you need 3 bits to indicate which slot has the number, and 5 bits for the number.

share|improve this answer
    
the code that I modified above works on giving me the unsigned integer that I needed. Now I just need to make it so that I can revert them into their slots =) – Benjamin Jun 3 '11 at 2:39
    
@Benjamin: Your new code has some major problems. Sorry to say, there's no way to get more than 6 slots out of a single 32-bit integer, if each slot can have a value from 0-31. To reverse what you've done, just right-shift by the appropriate number of places and mask the bits, like values[i] = (number >> places) & 0x1F; – Ben Voigt Jun 3 '11 at 2:44
    
Okay then apparently I can do it for 27 total slots max then. because of the first 6 bits. Other than that it would work. – Benjamin Jun 3 '11 at 3:01
1  
@Benjamin: You're not listening. If EACH slot has 32 possible values, then EACH slot needs 6 bits to itself. – Ben Voigt Jun 3 '11 at 3:32
    
So then, therefore i would need 196 bits to do what I want... Okay well the realtity is that I only need 0-3 at the most, because there are only 4 total patterns almost like ARGB in a color, where 4 bytes, define 0-255 for each color. So if I can do this for 0-3 that should give me 32 total slots right??? The goal is to break down 1 byte, into 4 parts, so 00 00 00 00 so if I had 00 11 11 11 that means slot 0=0, 1=3, 2=3, 3=3 – Benjamin Jun 3 '11 at 3:41

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