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I've seen a method in a Service class that was marked as @Transactional but it was also calling some other methods in that same class which were not marked as @Transactional.

Does that mean the call to separate methods are causing the application to open separate connections to DB or suspend the parent transaction, etc?

What's the default behavior for a method without any annotations that is called by another method with @Transactional annotation?

Thanks

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When you call a method without @Transactional within a transaction block, the parent transaction will continue to the new method. It will use the same connection from the parent method(with @Transactional) and any exception caused in the called method(without @Transactional will cause the transaction to rollback as configured in the transaction definition.

If you call a method with a @Transactional annotation from a method with @Transactional within the same instance, then the called methods transactional behavior will not have any impact on the transaction. But if you call a method with a transaction definition from another method with a transaction definition, and they are in different instances, then the code in the called method will follow the transaction definitions given in the called method.

You can find more details in the section Declarative transaction management of spring transaction documentation.

Spring declarative transaction model uses AOP proxy. so the AOP proxy is responsible for creation of the transactions. The AOP proxy will be active only if the methods with in the instance are called from out side the instance.

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is that the spring default behavior ? – goe Jun 3 '11 at 3:18
    
Yes. It is the default behavior. – Arun P Johny Jun 3 '11 at 3:20
    
@Arun There is one more dimension to that which is transaction propagation attribute. In @Transactional you can specify propagation attribute that is enumeration value of type @Propagation. – Tomasz Błachowicz Jun 3 '11 at 12:43
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@Tomasz Yes. But it should also be mentioned that changing transaction propagation on a method that is called from another @Transactional method will have no effect. – Fil Jun 3 '11 at 17:13
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@Filip, That is not completely correct, If you call a method with a @Transactional definition from a different object/instance then even though the calling method have a different @Transactional attributes, the called method will follow the it own transaction definition. – Arun P Johny Jun 4 '11 at 6:33
  • Does that mean the call to separate methods are causing the application to open separate connections to DB or suspend the parent transaction, etc?

That depends on a propagation level. Here are all the possible level values.

For example in case a propagation level is NESTED a current transaction will "suspend" and a new transaction will be created ( note: actual creation of a nested transaction will only work on specific transaction managers )

  • What's the default behavior for a method without any annotations that is called by another method with @Transactional annotation?

The default propagation level ( what you call "behavior" ) is REQUIRED. In case an "inner" method is called that has a @Transactional annotation on it ( or transacted declaratively via XML ), it will execute within the same transaction, e.g. "nothing new" is created.

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@Transactional marks the transaction boundary (begin/end) but the transaction itself is bound to the thread. Once a transaction starts it propagates across method calls until the original method returns and the transaction commits/rolls back.

If another method is called that has a @Transactional annotation then the propagation depends on the propagation attribute of that annotation.

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