Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am building a program in c++ where the user can set a function to be called when user defined conditions are reached. I am only a little experienced with c++.

I know how to do this in python. You would simply define functions and put the names of said functions into a structure (I always used a dictionary). When you go to use the function, you would make a call similar to:

methods = { "foo" : foo, "bar" : bar } 
choice = input("foo or bar? ")
methods[choice]()

Any ideas on how to pull this off in c++ without having to hardcode everything?

share|improve this question
    
A lot of answers suggest function pointers, but you might find function objects more intuitive, like std::function<> or boost::function<> –  Inverse Jun 3 '11 at 13:02
2  
If you're satisfied with one of the answers, you should accept it by clicking the checkmark next to it –  jalf Jun 3 '11 at 20:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your Python code actually translates to C++ pretty much directly:

# Python:
# Create a dictionary mapping strings to functions
methods = { "foo" : foo, "bar" : bar } 
// C++:
// create a map, mapping strings to functions (function pointers, specifically)
std::map<std::string, void(*)()> methods; 
methods["foo"] = foo;
methods["bar"] = bar;

# Python
choice = input("foo or bar? ")
// C++:
std::string choice;
std::cout << "foo or bar? ";
std::cin >> choice;

# Python:
methods[choice]()
// C++
methods[choice]();

Python's dictionary is similar to C++'s map. They're both associative containers, mapping a value from one type to a value of another (in our case, string to function). In C++, functions aren't quite first-class citizens, so you can't store a function in a map, but you can store a pointer to a function. Hence the map definition gets a bit hairy, because we have to specify that the value type is a "pointer to a function which takes no arguments and returns void".

On a side note, it is assumed that all your functions have the same signature. We can't store both functions that return void and functions that return an int in the same map without some additional trickery.

share|improve this answer
    
oh, nice! thats exactly the type of thing I was looking for! I am pretty sure all the functions that will be called will be void, and I'm fairly sure they will all carry no arguments. I think this will actually work perfectly! –  user696206 Jun 3 '11 at 6:40

You can use a map of function pointers:

void foo() { }
void bar() { }

typedef void (*FunctionPtr)();
typedef std::map<std::string, FunctionPtr> FunctionMap;

FunctionMap functions;
functions.insert(std::make_pair("foo", &foo));
functions.insert(std::make_pair("bar", &bar));

std::string method = get_method_however_you_want();

FunctionMap::const_iterator it(functions.find(method));
if (it != functions.end() && it->second)
    (it->second)();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I don't understand any of it, but I know the direction I need to look! thanks! –  user696206 Jun 3 '11 at 3:45
2  
Why insert() and &foo rather than functions["foo"] = foo;? They're essentially equivalent, but the latter is more readable. Also, testing it->second is only necessary if the map contains null entries, which seems thoroughly unlikely. And it->second() works just fine without the extra parentheses. –  Jon Purdy Jun 3 '11 at 6:30
2  
@Jon: First, &foo is IMHO clearer. I don't like the implicit conversion from function-names to function-pointer. For the question on insert vs operator[], follow this link. Next, the testing is perfectly ok, you never know what users of your code might do. –  Xeo Jun 3 '11 at 6:52
1  
@Xeo: Okay, the first is a matter of opinion, and I understand the dislike. insert() versus operator[] is more stylistic, as this is only going to be called once, and not in a performance-critical region. Last, you're right of course, but maybe then an assert is best, not just for it->second, but also possibly for it != functions.end(). –  Jon Purdy Jun 3 '11 at 7:21
    
@Xeo: and yet, the python equivalent code behaves as operator[] (the user is not checking whether the identifier was present in the dictionary before inserting, so I would have just used: functions["foo"] = &foo;, the user is not checking whether the user input is valid in python either, but I think that is a must, so +1 for adding the check. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 3 '11 at 7:25

You may have a look at function pointers:

http://www.newty.de/fpt/intro.html

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the link! now I know where to get the info I need! –  user696206 Jun 3 '11 at 3:46

Another option is function objects + inheritance:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <conio>
#include <exception>
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

struct Method{
    virtual ~Method(){}

    virtual
    void operator() (void)=0;
};
struct foo: public Method{
    virtual ~foo(){}

    virtual
    void operator() (void){
        std::cout << "this is foo\n";
    }
};
struct bar: public Method{
    virtual ~bar(){}

    virtual
    void operator() (void){
        std::cout << "this is bar\n";
    }
};

Method* getMethodByName(std::string methName){
    if( methName == "foo" )
        return new foo();
    else if( methName == "bar" )
        return new bar();

    throw invalid_argument("Unknown method");
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::string choice;

    std::cout << "foo or bar?\n";
    std::cin >> choice;

    boost::shared_ptr<Method> method = getMethodByName(choice);
    (*method)();

    getch();
    return 0;
}

Though this requires boost's smart pointer lib. With vanilla C++:

    Method* method = getMethodByName( choice );
    try{
        (*method)();
        delete method;
    }
    catch(...){
        delete method;
    }

    getch();
    return 0;
share|improve this answer
    
Virtual functions, and virtual base deleter invocation, with no virtual destruction? –  Puppy Jun 3 '11 at 6:22
    
@DeadMG: Yes, I've checked and it's really leaky. I thought it would be OK, because classes have no data. It's been a while since I've did C++. Thanks! –  Alexander Malakhov Jun 3 '11 at 6:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.