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In general, are there any benefits in declaring a private class as static?

In what cases would I want to use one of the following over the other?

private static class Foo
{
    ...
}

vs

private class Foo
{
    ...
}
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The java-inner-class-and-static-nested-class maybe helpful. –  MockerTim Jun 3 '11 at 5:05
    
You may find the second answer in this post helpful: stackoverflow.com/questions/1844355/java-static-class –  gwood Jun 3 '11 at 5:06

7 Answers 7

If you need access to the member variables/methods of the enclosing class, use the non-static form. If you don't, use the static form.

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1  
This is poor answer. Even from a static class, if i get reference to object of the parent class, i can access the private members. –  Op De Cirkel Jun 3 '11 at 5:11
    
But why would you? If you need access to the private variables and it is an inner class, just make it non-static instead of making it static and passing a reference to the parent. –  Jeff Storey Jun 3 '11 at 5:27
    
They are different concepts. non-static (i.e. inner) classes have implicit reference to object of the parent class. So, you can not have object of the inner class if there is no object of the parent class. An example of this would be Map.Entry (or better Iterator) - it needs reference to the parent map object. an example of static nested class would be Builder, it needs access to parent's private constructor –  Op De Cirkel Jun 3 '11 at 5:33
    
But these classes (Map.Entry for example) are not private. The OP asked about private classes. –  Jeff Storey Jun 3 '11 at 12:20
    
@Jeff Storey, perhaps the interface is not private, but the implementation is possible and good to be private/protected. i.e. When you say myList.getIterator(), you are getting some implementation of the Iterator iface that is private or protected –  Op De Cirkel Jun 3 '11 at 12:54

The following partially will answer your question: Nested/Inner class in external file

--Edit--

An example of inner (non-static) class would be list iterator. the list has to exist to have iterator on it.

on the other hand static nested can be used like this (see builder in Effective Java):

MyClass {
  private MyClass(Builder b) {
    // use the builder
  }
  // some methods

 public static class Builder {
  // some methods
  public build() {
    return new MyClass(this)
  }
 }

}

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I think this is a good starting point: http://java67.blogspot.fi/2012/10/nested-class-java-static-vs-non-static-inner.html

1) Nested static class doesn't need reference of Outer class but non static nested class or Inner class requires Outer class reference. You can not create instance of Inner class without creating instance of Outer class. This is by far most important thing to consider while making a nested class static or non static.

2) static class is actually static member of class and can be used in static context e.g. static method or static block of Outer class.

3) Another difference between static and non static nested class is that you can not access non static members e.g. method and field into nested static class directly. If you do you will get error like "non static member can not be used in static context". While Inner class can access both static and non static member of Outer class.

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static classes differ from ordinary classes only in that they can be accessed without their instances being created. so if you need some class to be accessable every time, use static

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1  
i dont think he asked what is static class.. –  BBdev Jun 3 '11 at 5:21

This is an awesome read: Static classes in Java

Summary:

...So if you don't want anyone instantiating the class, which is normally if you have some kind of helper/utils class then I use the what I call the static class, a class with a private constructor and only consists of Static methods without any any variables.

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3  
That isn't the kind of static class this question is about. –  ColinD Jun 3 '11 at 5:11

I would assume you are referring to inner classes.

I think the motivation would be coming from how you want to associate your inner class. If you want your inner class to be associated to a specific instance of its outer class, you'd use private class, otherwise, use private static class.

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I found it useful in having a specific exception in a generic abstract class. I.e.:

public abstract class AbstractClass <T>
{
    private void doSomethingOrThrowException() throws SpecificException
    {
        ....

        if ( ! successful)
        {
            throw new SpecificException();
        }
    }

    private static class SpecificException extends Exception {}
}

If I were to leave out the static, the compiler would give me an error that states: The generic class AbstractClass<T>.SpecificException may not subclass java.lang.Throwable

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