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How can I prevent from concurrent access. I have code like this

public class MC implements Runnable {

    public void run() {
        sync();
    }

    public static void main(String p[]){
        MC mc = new MC();
        MC mc2 = new MC();
        MC mc3 = new MC();
        MC mc4 = new MC();
        Thread t = new Thread(mc);
            t.start();
            Thread t2 = new Thread(mc2);
            t2.start();
            Thread t3 = new Thread(mc3);
            t3.start();
            Thread t4 = new Thread(mc4);
            t4.start();
    }

    private synchronized void sync(){
        try {
            System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis());
            Thread.sleep(10000);
        } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

and I am getting output like this

1307082622317
1307082622317
1307082622317
1307082622317
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 11 seconds)

any advice?

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What would be the desired output? –  Waldheinz Jun 3 '11 at 6:47
    
What are you trying to achieve? –  trojanfoe Jun 3 '11 at 6:49
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

make your method static:

private static synchronized void sync();

your method as coded is synchronized on the instance, but each thread has its own instance, so there's no synchronization.

static methods are synchronized on the Class object, of which there is only one per class, so all instances will synchronize on static methods.

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You've got four separate MC objects. Typically running an instance method on those (sync), they shouldn't interfere with each other. You can use a synchronized block to make sure only one runs at a time, but you need to consider what to synchronize on:

  • If you synchronize on a separate object per instance, that would stop two threads from running the code for the same object. That's effectively what you've got now, but you're implicitly synchronizing on this, which I would discourage you from doing. (Any other code could synchronize on the same object.)
  • If you synchronize on an object that all the instances know about (e.g. via a static variable) then that would only let one thread run the code at all.

It sounds like you want the latter approach, but it doesn't sound like great design to me. If you really want to implement it that way, you'd use:

public class MC implements Runnable {

    private static readonly Object lock = new Object();

    ...

    private void sync() {
        synchronized (lock) {
            try {
                System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis());
                Thread.sleep(10000);
            } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                ex.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

Keeping sync as a synchronized method but making it static would also work, but again you'd be locking on a publicly visible object (MC.class) which I generally discourage.

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Skeet does it again! :-) –  Buhake Sindi Jun 3 '11 at 6:51
    
yawn - see my answer: just make the method static –  Bohemian Jun 3 '11 at 6:52
1  
@Bohemian: As I specifically say at the end of my answer, that would work but it would mean locking on a publicly visible object. Not a good idea, IMO - I like to be able to reason about my code, knowing that nothing else can be locking on the same objects. –  Jon Skeet Jun 3 '11 at 6:58
    
@Jon_Skeet: Fair enough, but frankly the entire class is "less than well designed" and only for demo purposes, so this quick fix answered his "wtf is going on" question. –  Bohemian Jun 3 '11 at 7:15
1  
@Bohemian: You can choose to just give a quick fix if you want to, but I would rather question the design and mention best practices at the same time. I think the OP will learn more that way, even if you just yawn... –  Jon Skeet Jun 3 '11 at 7:17
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For the desired functionality, you can make the sync function static. I don't talk about the goodness of design. It just do it the way you like!

private static synchronized void sync()
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You are instantiating four objects, and sychronized is on different monitor. Either make sync static so that the actual class will be the monitor, or when you instantiate, pass same monitor object to all four, then sync on it

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use a static lock tisynchronize your method. lock classes are inside the java.concurent package

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Hi u are creating new instances of ur class MC, synchronized method guarantees single access for one instance if it is not static method.

I would suggest u have a private static variable say Integer lock, and then synchronize on it:

private void sync() {

synchronized (lock) {

    try {
        System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis());
        Thread.sleep(10000);
    } catch (InterruptedException ex){
        ex.printStackTrace();
    }

}

}

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