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I meet a weird problem in scala. Following is my code, class Employee extends class Person

But this piece of code can not been compiled, I have explicit define firstName and lastName as val variable. Why is that ? Does it mean I have to override val variable in base class ? And what is the purpose ?

class Person( firstName: String,  lastName: String) {

}

class Employee(override val firstName: String, override val lastName: String, val depart: String)
    extends Person(firstName,lastName){

} 
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The input parameters for the constructor are not vals unless you say they are. And if they are already, why override them?

class Person(val firstName: String, val lastName: String) {}
class Strange(
  override val firstName: String, override val lastName: String
) extends Person("John","Doe") {}
class Employee(fn: String, ln: String, val depart: String) extends Person(fn,ln) {}

If they're not vals and you want to make vals, you don't need to override:

class Person(firstName: String, lastName: String) {}
class Employee(
  val firstName: String, val lastName: String, val depart: String
) extends Person(firstName,lastName) {}
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1  
I see this often enough that I though it was worth calling out as a common Scala programming mistake. –  Aaron Novstrup Jun 3 '11 at 19:24
1  
This answer answers the question with a question. Which I will try to answer. The reason you have to say override in front of val in the Strange class is to tell the compiler that you aren't intending to introduce a new field. override means roughly "here I am declaring something that is already declared in the parent class and do not intend to introduce something that isn't inherited". Without the "override" val means "please create a public, readonly field". However Scala does not permit two val fields to have the same name. Thus the override is obligatory. –  Theodore Norvell Jul 31 '13 at 20:02
    
@TheodoreNorvell - My point was supposed to be that there's no reason to create the override if you're just going to extend the original class with the same fields. Just pass them in as parameters and let the superclass vals be vals. –  Rex Kerr Jul 31 '13 at 20:41
    
@RexKerr Ok, that's a good point. You were asking, "why have the override val?"; I was answering, "why have the override given that you have the val?". In the code that I am writing, I had a similar situation, but, in my case, the subclass is a case class and so the constructor parameter is automatically a val. In this case, the compiler gives an error message unless the override keyword is in there and, presumably for syntactic reasons, it also requires the val keyword. The only downsides are these two extra words and that the field is initialized twice. –  Theodore Norvell Aug 2 '13 at 12:40
1  
As I mentioned, I had a case class. Essentially I had sealed abstract class Command(val coord : Coord) ; case class Assignment(lhs : Expr, rhs : Expr, override val coord : Coord) extends Command(coord); ... and then many other cases. A better way to do this was to give the constructors 2 parameter lists like this: sealed abstract class Command(val coord : Coord) ; case class Assignment(lhs : Expr, rhs : Expr)(coord : Coord) extends Command(coord); .... In the 2nd parameter list, parameters are not automatically made into val fields. –  Theodore Norvell Aug 11 '13 at 18:21

Since the constructor arguments have no val/var declaration in Person, and as Person is no case class, the arguments will not be members of class Person, merely constructor arguments. The compiler is telling you essentially: hey, you said, that firstName and lastName are members, which overrizde/redefine something inherited from a base class - but there is nothing as far as I can tell...

class Person(val firstName: String, val lastName: String)
class Employee(fn: String, ln: String, val salary: BigDecimal) extends Person(fn, ln)

You do not need to declare firstName/lastName as overrides here, btw. Simply forwarding the values to the base class' constructor will do the trick.

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You might also consider redesigning your super classes as traits as much as possible. Example:

trait Person {
  def firstName: String
  def lastName: String
}

class Employee(
  val firstName: String,
  val lastName: String,
  val department: String
) extends Person

or even

trait Employee extends Person {
  def department: String
}

class SimpleEmployee(
  val firstName: String,
  val lastName: String,
  val department: String
) extends Employee
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Unless I've misunderstood your intention, here's how to extend Person.

Welcome to Scala version 2.8.0.final (Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM, Java 1.6.0_21).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.

scala> class Person( firstName: String, lastName: String)
defined class Person

scala> class Employee(firstName: String, lastName: String, depart: String) extends Person(firstName, lastName)
defined class Employee
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