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I can't think clearly at the moment, I want to return counts by station_id, an example of output would be:

station 1 has 3 fb post, 6 linkedin posts, 5 email posts station 2 has 3 fb post, 6 linkedin posts, 5 email posts

So I need to group by the station id, my table structure is

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `posts` (
  `post_id` bigint(11) NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `station_id` varchar(25) NOT NULL,
  `user_id` varchar(25) NOT NULL,
  `dated` datetime NOT NULL,
  `type` enum('fb','linkedin','email') NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`post_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=x ;

The query I have so far is returning station 0 as having 2 linkedin posts when it has one (2 in the db tho)

SELECT Station_id, (select count(*) FROM posts WHERE type = 'linkedin') AS linkedin_count, (select count(*) FROM posts WHERE type = 'fb') AS fb_count, (select count(*) FROM posts WHERE type = 'email') AS email_count  FROM `posts` GROUP BY station_id;
share|improve this question
up vote 13 down vote accepted

Or, the fastest way, avoiding joins and subselects to get it in the exact format you want:

SELECT
  station_id,
  SUM(CASE WHEN type = 'linkedin' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS 'linkedin',
  SUM(CASE WHEN type = 'fb'       THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS 'fb',
  SUM(CASE WHEN type = 'email'    THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS 'email'
FROM posts
GROUP BY station_id;

Outputs:

+------------+----------+------+-------+
| station_id | linkedin | fb   | email |
+------------+----------+------+-------+
| 1          |        3 |    2 |     5 |
| 2          |        2 |    0 |     1 |
+------------+----------+------+-------+

You may also want to put an index on there to speed it up

ALTER TABLE posts ADD INDEX (station_id, type);

Explain output:

+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+------------+---------+------+------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys | key        | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+------------+---------+------+------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | posts | index | NULL          | station_id | 28      | NULL |   13 | Using index |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+------------+---------+------+------+-------------+
share|improve this answer
    
This version of the query will also show the zero count for fb for station_id 2, which your previous one doesn't show. Also it's elegant :) – cairnz Jun 3 '11 at 10:15

As implied by gnif's answer, having three correlated sub_queries has a performance over-head. Depending on the DBMS you're using, it could perform similarly to having a self join three times.

gnif's methodology ensures that the table is only parsed once, without the need for joins, correlated sub_queries, etc.

The immediately obvious down-side of gnif's answer is that you don't ever get records for 0's. If there are no fb types, you just don't get a record. If that is not an issue, I'd go with his answer. If it is an issue, however, here is a version with similar methodology to gnif, but matching your output format...

SELECT
  station_id,
  SUM(CASE WHEN type = 'linkedin' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS linkedin_count,
  SUM(CASE WHEN type = 'fb'       THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS fb_count,
  SUM(CASE WHEN type = 'email'    THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS email_count
FROM
  posts
GROUP BY
  station_id
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like I beat you to this solution :), I posted a 2nd answer already. – Geoffrey Jun 3 '11 at 10:19
    
Doh, you type fast :) I'll +1 your answer :) – MatBailie Jun 3 '11 at 10:21
    
Thanks :), I +1'd yours too :) – Geoffrey Jun 3 '11 at 10:22

Give this a go:

SELECT station_id, type, count(*) FROM posts GROUP BY station_id, type

The output format will be a little different to what your attempting to get, but it should provide the statistics your trying to retrieve. Also since its a single query it is much faster.

-- Edit, added example result set

+------------+----------+----------+
| station_id | type     | count(*) |
+------------+----------+----------+
| 1          | fb       |        2 |
| 1          | linkedin |        3 |
| 1          | email    |        5 |
| 2          | linkedin |        2 |
| 2          | email    |        1 |
+------------+----------+----------+
share|improve this answer

try this:

SELECT p.Station_id, 
(select count(*) FROM posts WHERE type = 'linkedin' and station_id=p.station_id) AS linkedin_count, 
(select count(*) FROM posts WHERE type = 'fb' and station_id=p.station_id) AS fb_count, 
(select count(*) FROM posts WHERE type = 'email' and station_id=p.station_id) AS email_count 
FROM `posts` p GROUP BY station_id
share|improve this answer
    
perfecto, cheers – Chris Mccabe Jun 3 '11 at 10:17
1  
This query is very slow as it is actually running 4 queries – Geoffrey Jun 3 '11 at 10:21
    
With your suggested INDEX, (station_id, type), this should not run too slow. The likely executed plan would scan that index, and for each station_id 'know' that the answers to the correlated sub-queries can already be found in the portion of the index being scanned. Without an index, however, this would probably be terrible over large datasets. – MatBailie Jun 3 '11 at 10:25
    
I'd avoid it simply because it's a bit less tidy than the alternatives. In my opinion. – MatBailie Jun 3 '11 at 10:27
    
@Dems - With an index it is still four times slower then it should be, if I could paste the explain output into here and have it format nice I would. – Geoffrey Jun 3 '11 at 10:30

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