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I have a situation where i need to call something like this :

class Office
   attr_accessor :workers, :id

   def initialize
      @workers = []
   end

   def workers<<(worker)
      type = worker.type
      resp = Organiation::Worker.post("/office/#{@id}/workers.json", :worker => {:type => type})
   end
end

this is where i need to call

office = Office.new()

new_worker = Worker.new()

office.workers << new_worker

how should i modify the above workers method in order to implement above code.

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Are you using a framework? e.g. Rails? –  Ant Jun 3 '11 at 10:55
2  
@Ant: I am not using rails its in gem –  Manish Das Jun 3 '11 at 10:57
    
I have updated my answer based on your new information. –  Mark Thomas Jun 3 '11 at 12:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

New answer for this (based on updated question):

class WorkersClient
  attr_accessor :office_id

  def <<(worker)
    type = worker.type
    resp = Organiation::Worker.post("/office/#{@office_id}/workers.json", :worker => {:type => type})
  end
end

class Office
  attr_accessor :workers, :id

  def initialize
    @workers = WorkersClient.new
    @workers.office_id = @id
  end
end

I'm assuming that the Worker class is defined somewhere, something like:

def Worker
  attr_accessor :type
  ...
end

The WorkersClient class is just a proxy to handle the collection (like ActiveRecord 3 does with associations). You can develop it further to store a local cache of workers, and so on.

I would recommend looking at how Rails' ActiveResource is implemented, as it does something VERY similar.

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2  
@Jits: but how can i access the id of office object in WorkersClient class ?? –  Manish Das Jun 3 '11 at 12:09
    
@ManishDas, answer updated. –  Jits Jun 3 '11 at 12:12
    
Interesting idea, but this doesn't work for office.workers << worker. –  Mark Thomas Jun 3 '11 at 12:21
    
@MarkThomas, have you tried it? What error message do you get? –  Jits Jun 3 '11 at 12:35
    
@Jits, the WorkersClient is not involved in that scenario. –  Mark Thomas Jun 3 '11 at 12:49

try this office.build_worker

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2  
@sadikha: I have to implement on gem so no database stuffs.. any idea how to do this?? –  Manish Das Jun 3 '11 at 10:58
    
@mark: u should see this meta.stackexchange.com/questions/82003/… no hard feelings :) –  Sadiksha Gautam Jun 5 '11 at 16:10

If those objects are actually ActiveRecord objects (which it sort of sounds like), you're probably looking at

office.workers << new_worker

Note the plural form.

If those objects are your own creations, you probably want Office#workers to return an Array'ish object, so something like

class Office
  def workers
    @workers ||= []
  end
end

Add sanity checks and whatnot as you see fit.

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2  
i can i do something like this : –  Manish Das Jun 3 '11 at 11:01
2  
def workers << worker.... –  Manish Das Jun 3 '11 at 11:01
    
Clarified the code example to make it obvious that the workers methods is meant to be in the Office class. –  Jakob S Jun 3 '11 at 11:06

There's not much to add to what's already been said, but one thing to think about is hiding the implementation of workers. Sure, it starts out with an array, but that may change. By implementing your own << method you can hide implementation details from the user.

class Office
  attr_accessor :workers

  def initialize
    @workers = []
  end

  def <<(other)
    self.workers << other
  end
end

I tend to use getter/setters inside my classes as that's something I learned from Smalltalk books, but of course you could just do @workers << other.

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