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How to stop C++ console application from exiting immediately?

I have the following console program:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int a;
    int b;


cout<<"Enter a";
cin>>a;

cout<<"Enter b";
cin>>b;

int result = a*b;

cout<<"You entered"<<a<<"and you entered"<<b<<"Their product is"<<result<<endl;
    return 0;
}

Once i run the program,it accepts the input but exits before i can have a look at the results.What do i need to do for the program not to exit before i can take a look at the results?.

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marked as duplicate by David, Jan Hudec, Bo Persson, tibur, John Saunders Jun 3 '11 at 18:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
What environment are you using? –  Captain Giraffe Jun 3 '11 at 12:10
    
Qt creator 4.7. –  Gandalf Jun 3 '11 at 12:15
    
You can always look at the results. Just capture the output or run it from existing console or something. –  Jan Hudec Jun 3 '11 at 12:19
    
Set a breakpoint? –  John Dibling Jun 3 '11 at 12:54

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What about adding system ("pause"); before return 0; statement?

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Build issues:'system' was not declared in this scope –  Gandalf Jun 3 '11 at 12:14
    
#include <cstdlib> will declare system for you. But it would be better to find out how to make your environment keep the console open after the program exits. –  Mike Seymour Jun 3 '11 at 12:16

BTW, you've already calculated the value of result before you've gotten your input for a and b, so the value of result will either be 0 if your compiler assembles code that zero-initializes any variables declared on the stack, or will just be some random value. In fact, you really don't need to even declare result ... you can calculate it's value in the cout statement. So you can adjust your last line so it looks like this:

cout << "You entered" << a <<"and you entered"<< b 
     << "Their product is" << (a*b) << endl;

To stop the program from exiting, you can grab another char from stdin. So you can do the following:

cout << "Press any key to exit..." << endl;
char extra;
cin >> extra;
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Use getche() ,getch() or any character based input function.

int main()
{
    int a;
    int b;
    int result = a*b;

cout<<"Enter a";
cin>>a;

cout<<"Enter b";
cin>>b;

cout<<"You entered"<<a<<"and you entered"<<b<<"Their product is"<<result<<endl;
getch(); //use this.It would wait for  a character to input.
return 0;
}

And generally we use Enter to exit the program whose ASCII value is fetched by it .But since it is of no use to us not storing it in a variable.

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You could ask for more feedback

cout<<"You entered"<<a<<"and you entered"<<b<<"Their product is"<<result<<endl;

char stop;
cin >> stop;
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I think this has been answered before.

How to stop C++ console application from exiting immediately?

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2  
And this is not an answer. –  tibur Jun 3 '11 at 12:37

I like to use getch() from conio.h when I'm on Windows, but that's not quite portable :/

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Windows:

//1
    system ("pause");
//2
    #include<conio.h>
    _getch();

.NET (Windows):

System::Console::ReadLine();

Overall:

    #include <cstdlib.h>
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
share|improve this answer
    
I've no idea what <conio.h> is (or indeed _getch), but I'm guessing that also only works on Windows. In Standard C++, you want getchar() from <cstdio> or cin.get() from <iostream>. –  Mike Seymour Jun 3 '11 at 12:22
    
_getch() works in gcc. –  Secko Jun 3 '11 at 12:22
    
@Secko: Not in my version it doesn't. The standard functions will work on any conforming compiler. –  Mike Seymour Jun 3 '11 at 12:32
    
Hmm, it appears that it is so. However, it works on my machine with gcc. –  Secko Jun 3 '11 at 12:35
    
Also, in C++ you should get EXIT_SUCCESS from <cstdlib>, not the deprecated C header; and you don't need a return statement at the end of main at all. –  Mike Seymour Jun 3 '11 at 12:37

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