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I have the below code but it lives on after the queue is empty, any insights:

def processor():
   while(1>0):
    if queue.empty() == True:  
    print "the Queue is empty!"  
    break
   source=queue.get()
   page = urllib2.urlopen(source)
   print page   

def main:
   for i in range(threads):  
    th = Thread(target=processor)  
    th.setDaemon(True)  
    th.start()  
   queue.join()  

It prints queue empty as many times as I have threads and just stands there doing nothing.

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6  
Please fix the indentation and post a complete example. –  NPE Jun 3 '11 at 12:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to call queue.task_done() after printing the page, otherwise join() will block. Each thread, after using get() must call task_done().

See documentation for queue

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If your threads die when there is no work left in the queue, you can join to the threads (instead of the queue) without needing to call task_done(). –  Steven Rumbalski Jun 3 '11 at 14:33

This part:

   while(1>0):
    if queue.empty() == True:  
    print "the Queue is empty!"  
    break

Above is just plain wrong. queue.get() is blocking, there is absolutely no reason to have a busy loop. It should be deleted.

Your code should look something like this.

def processor():
   source=queue.get()
   page = urllib2.urlopen(source)
   print page   
   queue.task_done()

def main:
   for i in range(threads):  
    th = Thread(target=processor)  
    th.setDaemon(True)  
    th.start()  
   for source in all_sources:
    queue.put(source)
   queue.join()  

It's not the cleanest way to exit, but it will work. Since processor threads are set to be daemons, whole process with exit as soon as the main is done.

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As Max said, need a complete example to help with your behavior, but from the documentation:

Python’s Thread class supports a subset of the behavior of Java’s Thread class; currently, there are no priorities, no thread groups, and threads cannot be destroyed, stopped, suspended, resumed, or interrupted.

It stops being alive when its run() method terminates – either normally, or by raising an unhandled exception. The is_alive() method tests whether the thread is alive.

http://docs.python.org/library/threading.html

The lower level thread module does allow you to manually call exit(). Without a more complete example, I don't know if that's what you need in this case, but I suspect not as Thread objects should automatically end when run() is complete.

http://docs.python.org/library/thread.html

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And the recommendation with Python is to use multiprocessing rather than multithreading, is it not (for non-I/O intensive tasks, at least)? As multiple threads won't actually run concurrently even if you have them executing on different processors due to the global interpreter lock. I guess that doesn't matter for Max as he will have plenty of I/O waits. –  JAB Jun 3 '11 at 13:54
    
@JAB As far as I know, that's correct. –  Jacinda Jun 4 '11 at 4:04

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