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I'd like your opinion on the following subject:

Imagine we have a method that is responsible of achieving one specific purpose, but to do so, it needs the support of an important number of locally scoped objects, many of them implementing IDisposable.

MS coding standards say that when using local IDisposable objects that need not "survive" the scope of the method (will not be returned or will not be assigned to the state information of some longer lived object for instance) you should use the using construct.

The problem is, that in some situations you can get a nested "hell" of using blocks:

using (var disposableA = new DisposableObjectA())
{
     using (var disposableB = new DisposableObjectB())
     {
          using (var disposableC = new DisposableObjectC())
          {
               //And so on, you get the idea.
          }
     }
}

You can somehow mitigate this if some of the objects you are using derive from a common base or implement a common interface that implements IDisposable. This of course comes at a cost of having to cast said objects whenever you need the true type of the object. Sometimes this can be viable as long as the amount of casting doesn't get out of hand:

using (var disposableA = new DisposableObjectA())
{
     using (DisposableBaseObject disposableB = new DisposableObjectB(),
            disposableC = new DisposableObjectC)
     {
          using (var disposableD = new DisposableObjectD())
          {
               //And so on, you get the idea.
          }
     }
}

The other option is not to use using blocks and implement directly try-catch blocks. This would look like:

DisposableObjectA disposableA = null;
DisposableObjectB disposableB = null;
DisposableObjectC disposableC = null;
...

try
{
    disposableA = new DisposableObjectA();
    ....
}
finally
{
     if (disposableA != null)
     {
          disposableA.Dispose();
     }

     if (disposableB != null)
     {
          disposableB.Dispose();
     }

     //and so on
}

Funny thing, is that VS Code Analyzer will flag this code as "wrong". It will inform you that not all possible execution paths ensure that all disposable objects will be disposed before going out of scope. I can only see that happening if some object throws while disposing which in my opinion should never happen, and if it does, its normally a sign that something really messed up is going on and you are probably better of exiting as fast and gracefully as you can from your entire app.

So, the question is: what approach do you like better? Is it always preferable to use nested using blocks no matter how many, or, past a certain limit, its better to use try-catch block?

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Not sure I would describe the nesting as "hell" but a valid question +1 –  Jodrell Jun 3 '11 at 12:57
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3 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You don't need the curly brackets if there's just one statement, for example:

using (var disposableA = new DisposableObjectA())
using (var disposableB = new DisposableObjectB())
using (var disposableC = new DisposableObjectC())
{
               //And so on, you get the idea.
}

This does depend on nothing else happening in the outer blocks though.

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This is what I do in this situation. –  Gabe Jun 3 '11 at 12:51
    
I've often written using blocks 2 or 3 levels deep and thought 'damn that looks ugly'. Thanks for this - it's one of those DOH! moments. –  James Gaunt Jun 3 '11 at 12:53
    
+1 for multiple disposable objects this is how i expect to see them arranged whenever possible –  Chris Marisic Jun 3 '11 at 12:55
    
DOH! moment indeed. Never thought of that even though its obviously legal and expected with how all other blocks work in C#. Still, in the real code I'm working on there is some intermediate code (not in every using, but in quite a few) so the code still looks horrible. –  InBetween Jun 3 '11 at 13:01
    
Could you factor the intermediate code out into a method that returned the disposable? If you need to break out of the flow you'd need to use an exception I suppose. –  James Gaunt Jun 3 '11 at 13:15
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I think you are forgetting that the using statement (like many others), don't necessarily require a code block, but can be a single statement. Your first example can be written as:

using (var disposableA = new DisposableObjectA())
using (var disposableB = new DisposableObjectB())
using (var disposableC = new DisposableObjectC())
{
    //And so on, you get the idea.
}

I think this eases the problem tremendously. Note, it doesn't help if you need to do something between the invocation of the instances that implement IDisposable.

I even go so far as to nest other blocks that make sense. foreach is an example.

IEnumerable<int> ints = ...;

using (var disposableA = new DisposableObjectA())
using (var disposableB = new DisposableObjectB())
using (var disposableC = new DisposableObjectC())
foreach (int i in ints)
{
    // Work with disposableA, disposableB, disposableC, and i.
}

It should be noted that VS Code analyzer is correct when it tells you that this is incorrect:

DisposableObjectA disposableA = null;
DisposableObjectB disposableB = null;
DisposableObjectC disposableC = null;
...

try
{
    disposableA = new DisposableObjectA();
    ....
}
finally
{
     if (disposableA != null)
     {
          disposableA.Dispose();
     }

     if (disposableB != null)
     {
          disposableB.Dispose();
     }

     //and so on
}

When you use using stacked on top of each other, it nests them in multiple try/finally blocks, like so:

DisposableObjectA disposableA = null;
DisposableObjectB disposableB = null;
DisposableObjectC disposableC = null;
...

try
{
    disposableA = new DisposableObjectA();

    try
    {
        disposableB = new DisposableObjectB();

        // Try/catch block with disposableC goes here.
    }
    finally
    {
         if (disposableB != null)
         {
              disposableB.Dispose();
         }    
    }
}
finally
{
     if (disposableA != null)
     {
          disposableA.Dispose();
     }    
}

In your example, if there is an exception that is thrown when disposableA.Dispose is executed, then disposableB and disposableC do not get disposed (the finally block is exited), if an error is thrown when disposableB is called, then disposableC is not closed, etc.

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Thanks for the answer! Yeah, I'm aware that the code analyzer is correct. In my case though, having an object throw when disposing is a sure sign of something pretty bad going on (as there is no real valid reason for it to throw). In that case, I'm probably better of bailing out as fast and gracefully as possible before I do more harm. –  InBetween Jun 3 '11 at 13:10
    
@InBetween: That doesn't make much sense though; if your Dispose implementation is failing, yes, that's bad, but it's even worse if you don't dispose of other things. What if you catch the exception further up in the stack and handle it? Now you have resources that should have had their Dispose methods called on them which have not. –  casperOne Jun 3 '11 at 13:29
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The only real 'problem' with your first code sample is the deep nesting, which can make reading and maintaining code hard. As an alternative to the other answers suggesting you simply drop the curly braces, you can also work round this by refactoring the most deeply nested code out into a separate function. This separates the concerns of creating and disposing your disposable objects from actually using them.

using (var a = new DisposableObjectA())
{
    using (var b = new DisposableObjectB())
    {
         using (var c = new DisposableObjectC())
         {
              SomeFunction(a,b,c);
         }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why not combine the approaches, if one needs N items that implement IDisposable, then they need N code blocks by your example; for large N, that doesn't solve the problem of readability much. –  casperOne Jun 3 '11 at 12:57
    
yes, they can be combined. I tend to find that before long you need to call b.Init() or something before creating c, and then you suddenly need your curly braces back –  Mark Heath Jun 3 '11 at 12:58
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