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I would like to align my container div to center vertically just like it is aligning himself horizontally because of margin: auto;. I've searched some time on google on how to do that but it does not seem to be working for me. Maybe there is some kind of universal way to do that, as easy as margin: auto; method for horizontal centering? Because it seems for me very strange that we live in 2011 year and there is still no simple css command for doing this task...

#container
{
    margin: auto;
    width: 960px;
    height: 640px;
    background-color: brown;
}

screenshot

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Can it be even simpler...

html, body {
    overflow:hidden
}
#container {
    width:960px;
    height:640px;
    position:absolute;
    top:50%;
    left:50%;
    margin-top:-320px;
    margin-left:-480px;
    background:brown
}

The overflow:hidden is to hide the scrollbar that appears (html for IE6 and body for IE5). I don't know why this happens.

But if you want to keep it scrollable if the browser window is smaller, just make the height 639px and remove the overflow:hidden.

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Thank you. Worked like a charm. –  Steve Jun 3 '11 at 14:33
    
But doesn't this method hide the aligned div when the window is too small, I know the scroll can be shown, but as I remember (I need to test it) it hides the top. –  jackJoe Jun 3 '11 at 15:21
    
@jackJoe: Seems like you are right. I don't have an idea on how to fix that. –  Midas Jun 3 '11 at 15:24
    
that's because of the negative top margin, this method as no "cure" for that :( –  jackJoe Jun 3 '11 at 17:23
    
I know. You're example seems to do it. I'll have to verify how it works. But it's not so clean with the additional div. –  Midas Jun 3 '11 at 18:08
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There are tons of tutorials for vertical alignment, especially for IE, which needs special care. One of them: Vertically center content with CSS. Also another answer here.

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If your div has a fixed height, you can align it vertically by adding another div (with a float) with a negative margin (half the height of the main div) and then alter your div's CSS (adding the clear).

Also don't forget to specify the 100% height of the html and body, without that it doesn't work.

Like this:

CSS:

html {
    overflow: auto;
}
html, body {
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
    height:100%;
}
#alignDiv {
    float:left;
    height:50%;
    margin-bottom:-320px; /* half the centered div */
    width:1px;
}
#container
{
    margin: 0 auto;
    width: 960px;
    height: 640px;
    background-color: brown;
    clear:left; /* without the clear it won't center */
}

html:

<div id="alignDiv"></div>
<div id="container"></div>
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+1 I checked this, and it's really interesting actually. I made an example and changed the alignDiv to a header with a background image (so that the div has a use/meaning). You can see the effect when you resize the window here in this demo. I also changed the margin:0 auto to relative positioning so that it works in IE5.5 (maybe you can change this in your answer). Also works in Netscape Navigator FYI. Added to favourites because of this answer! –  Midas Jun 3 '11 at 19:04
    
@Midas it is clever indeed! (not my idea, I have just been using this method). Your example illustrates what happens to the alignDiv, the float/clear mix is what makes the magic happen. About IE5.5, you still care? Microsoft doesn't support IE6 anymore, IE5.5 obviously isn't supported either. –  jackJoe Jun 3 '11 at 19:18
    
Well, if that works for IE5.5 and other browsers, why not use it? BTW, I still use Windows 95 sometimes. :P –  Midas Jun 3 '11 at 19:20
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