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I believe this should be handled automatically. I am binding a DataGridView to an array of objects:

public class Entity {    
    public string Name { get; set; }     
    public int PrimaryKey { get; set; }
}

Binding the grid:

public void BindGrid(Entity[] entities) {
    grdEntities.DataSource = entities;
}

When I click the column header in the "Name" column, nothing is happening, even though the SortMode is set to Automatic. The sort glyph is also missing from the column header.

I have tried binding to an IBindingList and also an IList but this did not work.

I am hoping there is a simple, elegant solution with setting properties on either the DataGridView or the DataGridViewColumn rather than having to make a new class to support sorting. What should I be doing to support sorting on a column by clicking the header on a DataBound DataGridView?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I created a new IComparer based interface that allows you to specify both a column and a direction. I only did this because I need my sorting code to be as generic as possible - I have TWO grids that need to sort like this, and I don't want to maintain twice the code. Here is the interface, quite simple:

   public interface IByColumnComparer : IComparer
   {
      string SortColumn { get; set; }
      bool SortDescending { get; set; }
   }

Obviously, if you're not worried about keeping things generic (you probably should) than this isn't strictly necessary. Then, I built a new class that is based on BindingList<>. This allowed me to override the sorting code and provide my own IByColumnComparer on a column by column basis which is what allowed for the flexibility I needed. Check this out:

public class SortableGenericCollection<T> : BindingList<T>
{
  IByColumnComparer GenericComparer = null; 

  public SortableGenericCollection(IByColumnComparer SortingComparer)
  {
     GenericComparer = SortingComparer;
  }


  protected override bool SupportsSortingCore
  {
     get
     {
        return true;
     }
  }

  protected override bool IsSortedCore
  {
     get
     {
        for (int i = 0; i < Items.Count - 1; ++i)
        {
           T lhs = Items[i];
           T rhs = Items[i + 1];
           PropertyDescriptor property = SortPropertyCore;
           if (property != null)
           {
              object lhsValue = lhs == null ? null :
              property.GetValue(lhs);
              object rhsValue = rhs == null ? null :
              property.GetValue(rhs);
              int result;
              if (lhsValue == null)
              {
                 result = -1;
              }
              else if (rhsValue == null)
              {
                 result = 1;
              }
              else
              {
                 result = GenericComparer.Compare(lhs, rhs); 
              }
              if (result >= 0)
              {
                 return false;
              }
           }
        }
        return true;
     }
  }

  private ListSortDirection sortDirection;
  protected override ListSortDirection SortDirectionCore
  {
     get
     {
        return sortDirection;
     }
  }

  private PropertyDescriptor sortProperty;
  protected override PropertyDescriptor SortPropertyCore
  {
     get
     {
        return sortProperty;
     }
  }

  protected override void ApplySortCore(PropertyDescriptor prop,
  ListSortDirection direction)
  {
     sortProperty = prop;
     sortDirection = direction;

     GenericComparer.SortColumn = prop.Name;
     GenericComparer.SortDescending = direction == ListSortDirection.Descending ? true : false;

     List<T> list = (List<T>)Items;
     list.Sort(delegate(T lhs, T rhs)
     {
        if (sortProperty != null)
        {
           object lhsValue = lhs == null ? null :
           sortProperty.GetValue(lhs);
           object rhsValue = rhs == null ? null :
           sortProperty.GetValue(rhs);
           int result;
           if (lhsValue == null)
           {
              result = -1;
           }
           else if (rhsValue == null)
           {
              result = 1;
           }
           else
           {
              result = GenericComparer.Compare(lhs, rhs);
           }
           return result;
        }
        else
        {
           return 0;
        }
     });
  }

  protected override void RemoveSortCore()
  {
     sortDirection = ListSortDirection.Ascending;
     sortProperty = null;
  }
}

EDIT This should provide some information about how to create your own IComparer based on my interface above. The advantage to having your own IComparer based on the interface is that you can sort some columns one way, and other columns another (some columns might be strings, and some ints, some might have special rules about what goes on top, etc). Here is an example of how your IComparer might work:

public class MyGenericComparer : IByColumnComparer
{
  private string columnToCompare;
  private bool descending;

  public string SortColumn
  {
     get { return columnToCompare; }
     set { columnToCompare = value; }
  }

  public bool SortDescending
  {
     get { return descending; }
     set { descending = value; }
  }

  public MyGenericComparer(string column, bool descend)
  {
     columnToCompare = column;
     descending = descend;
  }

  public int Compare(object x, object y)
  {
     MyGenericObject firstObj = (MyGenericObject )x;
     MyGenericObject secondObj = (MyGenericObject )y;

     if (descending) 
     {
        MyGenericObject tmp = secondObj ;
        secondObj = firstObj ;
        firstObj = tmp;
     }

     if (columnToCompare == "StringColumn")
     {
        //Run code to compare strings, return the appropriate int
        //eg, "1" if firstObj was greater, "-1" is secondObj, "0" if equal
     }

     if (columnToCompare == "IntColumn")
     {
        //Run code to compare ints, return the appropriate int
        //eg, "1" if firstObj was greater, "-1" is secondObj, "0" if equal
     }
  }
}

Then all you have to do is create your list with an instance of your comparer!

public static MyGenericComparer GridComparer = new MyGenericComparer();
public static SortableGenericCollection<GenericObject> GridList = new SortableGenericCollection<GenericObject>(GridComparer);
share|improve this answer
    
Could you please provide an example of how you would populate the SortableGenericCollection<T> collection? I tried but I wasn't sure what to pass in for the SortingComparer parameter. –  Ian O'Brien Jun 3 '11 at 15:01
    
Done! Hope this helps. –  Chris Barlow Jun 3 '11 at 15:22

Might want to have a look at this question: DataGridView sort and e.g. BindingList<T> in .NET

The basic idea is that you have to extend BindingList<T> and override ApplySortCore in order to have column sorting working.

share|improve this answer
    
So basically this is not something that is done automatically in .NET? I'm just curious what that SortMode enum is for then; is that for non-bound Grids, or do you always have to add your own implementation? –  Ian O'Brien Jun 3 '11 at 14:44
    
If you provide a datasource extending BindingList<T> and supporting sort operations (a more detailed article here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms993236.aspx) then it is done automatically. –  Sorin Comanescu Jun 3 '11 at 14:50

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