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Firstly, I want to inform that, what I need is the reverse of in_array PHP function.

I need to search all items of array in the string if any of them found, function will return true otherwise return false.

I need the fastest solution to this problem, off course this can be succeeded by iterating the array and using the strpos function.

Any suggestions are welcome.

Example Data:

$string = 'Alice goes to school every day';

$searchWords = array('basket','school','tree');

returns true

$string = 'Alice goes to school every day';

$searchWords = array('basket','cat','tree');

returns false

share|improve this question
    
Well, I don't think you are getting any faster than strpos(). –  erisco Jun 3 '11 at 14:51
    
Disagree with u, @Erisco. Regular expressions will do it and are faster. I just don't know much of it. –  afaolek Jun 3 '11 at 14:55
    
Didn't check the answer by malko before I posted the initial comment. –  afaolek Jun 3 '11 at 14:56
    
@afaolek, I believe it is largely going to depend on the number of search words. For small numbers, I doubt regexp is going to win, unless the string being searched becomes very large and the number of search words is greater than one. –  erisco Jun 3 '11 at 15:18

7 Answers 7

You should try with a preg_match:

if (preg_match('/' . implode('|', $searchWords) . '/', $string)) return true;

After some comments here a properly escaped solution:

function contains($string, Array $search, $caseInsensitive = false) {
    $exp = '/'
        . implode('|', array_map('preg_quote', $search))
        . ($caseInsensitive ? '/i' : '/');
    return preg_match($exp, $string) ? true : false;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
$searchWords should be properly escaped –  binaryLV Jun 3 '11 at 14:51
    
Lovely answer :) –  Tapos Jun 3 '11 at 14:52
1  
Im not going to down vote you as it is a valid answer, but I do think that preg_match is pointless when you have functions like strstr and stristr –  RobertPitt Jun 3 '11 at 14:53
1  
Looping through values (which may mean looping through a whole lot of values) can be very inefficient. Using a regular expression may well be faster than that. But, as always, only profiling will reveal the faster method. –  Berry Langerak Jun 3 '11 at 14:58
1  
@RobertPitt So you're saying using foreach and if is always faster than matching with a regular expression? I'd love to see some benchmarks on that really, because I don't see that happening. –  Berry Langerak Jun 4 '11 at 15:34
function searchWords($string,$words)
{
    foreach($words as $word)
    {
        if(stristr($string," " . $word . " ")) //spaces either side to force a word
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Usage:

$string = 'Alice goes to school every day';
$searchWords = array('basket','cat','tree');

if(searchWords($string,$searchWords))
{
     //matches
}

Also take note that the function stristr is used to make it not case-sensitive

share|improve this answer
    
You might also specify that $words must be an array, i.e., function searchWords($string, array $words) { /* ... */ } –  binaryLV Jun 3 '11 at 14:56
    
Nope, That is only supported in very new releases of PHP, that would just confuse people in my opinion. –  RobertPitt Jun 3 '11 at 15:01
1  
Array type hinting was introduced in PHP 5.1.0 which was released in 24-Nov-2005 - I would not call it a "very new release" in year 2011. –  binaryLV Jun 6 '11 at 6:15
    
Hmm That's a good point, I must of been confused with something else along those lines. My Apologies. –  RobertPitt Jun 6 '11 at 8:07

As per the example of malko, but with properly escaping the values.

function contains( $string, array $search ) {
    return 0 !== preg_match( 
        '/' . implode( '|', preg_quote( $search, '/' ) ) . '/', 
        $string 
    );
}
share|improve this answer
    
isn't that what @malko just posted :/ –  RobertPitt Jun 3 '11 at 15:06
    
@Robert yes but this one properly escaped the searched string and is more reliable, i we want to make a "perfect" solution we can add a third parameter $caseInsensitive=false by default that add a 'i' to the end of the regexp to allow searching in a case insensitive manner ie: '/' . implode( '|', preg_quote( $search, '/' ) ) . '/'.($caseInsensitive?'i':'') –  malko Jun 3 '11 at 15:13
1  
in fact this won't work because preg_quote doesn't handle array as parameter, see my post i've edited your solution a litlle bit –  malko Jun 3 '11 at 15:34
    
ayea it should be implode( '|', array_map(function($e){return preg_quote( $e, '/' );},$search) –  RobertPitt Jun 4 '11 at 12:59

If string can be exploded using space following will work:

var_dump(array_intersect(explode(' ', $str), $searchWords) != null);

OUTPUT: for 2 examples you've provided:

bool(true)
bool(false)

Update:

If string cannot be exploded using space character, then use code like this to split string on any end of word character:

var_dump(array_intersect(preg_split('~\b~', $str), $searchWords) != null);
share|improve this answer
1  
Sometimes it's not possible to explode using space in my case, but thanks, this is a cool method. –  WebolizeR Jun 3 '11 at 15:00
    
@WebolizeR In that case you can use var_dump(array_intersect(preg_split('~\b~', $str), $searchWords) != null); that will split original string by any end of word character not just space. –  anubhava Jun 3 '11 at 15:15

try this:

$string = 'Alice goes to school every day';
$words = split(" ", $string); 
$searchWords = array('basket','school','tree');

for($x = 0,$l = count($words); $x < $l;) {
        if(in_array($words[$x++], $searchWords)) {
                //....
        }
}
share|improve this answer

There is always debate over what is faster so I thought I'd run some tests using different methods.

Tests Run:

  1. strpos
  2. preg_match with foreach loop
  3. preg_match with regex or
  4. indexed search with string to explode
  5. indexed search as array (string already exploded)

Two sets of tests where run. One on a large text document (114,350 words) and one on a small text document (120 words). Within each set, all tests were run 100 times and then an average was taken. Tests did not ignore case, which doing so would have made them all faster. Test for which the index was searched were pre-indexed. I wrote the code for indexing myself, and I'm sure it was less efficient, but indexing for the large file took 17.92 seconds and for the small file it took 0.001 seconds.

Terms searched for included: gazerbeam (NOT found in the document), legally (found in the document), and target (NOT found in the document).

Results in seconds to complete a single test, sorted by speed:

Large File:

  1. 0.0000455808639526 (index without explode)
  2. 0.0009979915618897 (preg_match using regex or)
  3. 0.0011657214164734 (strpos)
  4. 0.0023632574081421 (preg_match using foreach loop)
  5. 0.0051533532142639 (index with explode)

Small File

  1. 0.000003724098205566 (strpos)
  2. 0.000005958080291748 (preg_match using regex or)
  3. 0.000012607574462891 (preg_match using foreach loop)
  4. 0.000021204948425293 (index without explode)
  5. 0.000060625076293945 (index with explode)

Notice that strpos is faster than preg_match (using regex or) for small files, but slower for large files. Other factors, such as the number of search terms will of course affect this.

Algorithms Used:

//strpos
$str = file_get_contents('text.txt');
$t = microtime(true);
foreach ($search as $word) if (strpos($str, $word)) break;
$strpos += microtime(true) - $t;

//preg_match
$str = file_get_contents('text.txt');
$t = microtime(true);
foreach ($search as $word) if (preg_match('/' . preg_quote($word) . '/', $str)) break;
$pregmatch += microtime(true) - $t;

//preg_match (regex or)
$str = file_get_contents('text.txt');
$orstr = preg_quote(implode('|', $search));
$t = microtime(true);
if preg_match('/' . $orstr . '/', $str) {};
$pregmatchor += microtime(true) - $t;

//index with explode
$str = file_get_contents('textindex.txt');
$t = microtime(true);
$ar = explode(" ", $str);
foreach ($search as $word) {
    $start = 0; 
    $end = count($ar);
    do {
        $diff = $end - $start;
        $pos = floor($diff / 2) + $start;
        $temp = $ar[$pos];
        if ($word < $temp) {
            $end = $pos;
        } elseif ($word > $temp) {
            $start = $pos + 1;
        } elseif ($temp == $word) {
            $found = 'true';
            break;
        }
    } while ($diff > 0);
}
$indexwith += microtime(true) - $t;

//index without explode (already in array)
$str = file_get_contents('textindex.txt');
$found = 'false';
$ar = explode(" ", $str);
$t = microtime(true);
foreach ($search as $word) {
    $start = 0; 
    $end = count($ar);
    do {
        $diff = $end - $start;
        $pos = floor($diff / 2) + $start;
        $temp = $ar[$pos];
        if ($word < $temp) {
            $end = $pos;
        } elseif ($word > $temp) {
            $start = $pos + 1;
        } elseif ($temp == $word) {
            $found = 'true';
            break;
        }
    } while ($diff > 0);
}
$indexwithout += microtime(true) - $t;
share|improve this answer
    
You forgot to pass $word through preg_quote(). You also did not test preg_match() without foreach loop (by passing list of quotted "words" as word1|word2|word3). –  binaryLV Jun 6 '11 at 14:12
    
Great points. I've taken your suggestions and updated the results above. –  James Jun 8 '11 at 18:40
    
$orstr = preg_quote(implode('|', $search)); does not look right. Each word should be quoted rather than whole pattern. Replace it with $orstr = implode('|', array_map('preg_quote', $search)); $orstr = str_replace('/', '\\/', $orstr);. Second operation is needed for escaping delimiters. It would also be worth doing some tests with different sets of words (e.g., with 2 words and with 5 words). –  binaryLV Jun 9 '11 at 6:50

Below link will help you : just need to customize as you required.

Check if array element exists in string

customized:

function result_arrayInString($prdterms,208){
  if(arrayInString($prdterms,208)){
      return true;
  }else{
     return false;
  }
}

This may be helpful to you.

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